City Noodles, Brockley Road

BC review to follow, please post your comments and reviews here.

66 comments:

Kate said...

I have to confess, I really like City Noodles. Ok it's not the kind of authentic, healthy grub you get at Longtime Cafe, but sometimes I really like a bit of old-skool sweet n'sour king prawns ...

ElijahBailey said...

Lovely food, lovely service and not that expensive. What more could you ask for?

Monkeyboy said...

waxing lyrical about the Barge, eating at City Noodles...I'm beginning to think you're a bit common!

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

They must live on the darkside...

Bea said...

Great place - good food, cheap prices and friendly service. Shame about the shop front (but guess one can't have everything).

Kate said...

I'm afraid I'm terribly common, Monkeyboy ... I even say 'toilet'.

Headhunter said...

Toilet???!! Bang goes the neighbourhood...

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

lol Its funny you say that Kate. If i'm with someone I dont know too well i very often try to find some sort of other word so I dont have to use the word 'toilet' or 'loo'. Often I use the word 'bathroom' which is much more socially acceptable!

I must sound like a right snob....

Anonymous said...

you say toilet, I say shitter....

Brockley Nick said...

I'm sure the proprietors of City Noodles will be delighted with this strand of conversation, should they ever "log" on.

Anonymous said...

Is City Noodles part of a chain?

Kate said...

I dunno; I don't think so.

They recently re-did their menu to make more of the Thai dishes, by the way. The beef with basil is nice.

Anonymous said...

Loo is better than toilet.

Anonymous said...

I'm gobsmacked that anyone who uses this forum has ever been in there. I'm with Monkeyboy on this one..

Hugh said...

I agree. Nothing wrong with reviewing local eateries but this site tends to exaggerate hugely. Personally I wouldn't set foot in any 'restaurant' in the area. Happy to order in from Babur, of course, although that isn't in Brockley.

As for the pubs, why bother when they're so dingy and the city is so close?

neanderthal d said...

I find "Comfort Station" a marvellous euphemism for "the bog".

Anonymous said...

I kind of agree with that, there is a tenancy to overload the humblest of establishments with the most sanguine of plaudits. It all becomes a bit silly, these places are pretty ordinary, nothing to shout about.

Brockley has few places to eat that are of any note. Most are pretty hum drum. Often they could do better.

The best you can say about many is that they fill the gap for a hungry commuter or cooking adverse singleton.

That is nothing to get excited about. Delicate appraisals of the finer points of plastic food does not make it any less plastic.

Anonymous said...

You're all so terribly, terribly middle class.

Kung Fu Hustle said...

City Noodles is perhaps one of the most decent local places for Cantonese food. If you want the real stuff, you should trek over to Pennisular in Greenwich (especially for their Dim Sum) - but as takeways go, City Noodles isn't that bad at all.

spincat said...

Believe me, you really can't tell from the exterior of a place what the food is going to be like inside.

When I was studying years ago. I worked for MORI, and, because I was tramping around places like North Peckham Estate and the Ayslebury Estate in foul weather, I became a lot less fussy about places I dived into to keep warm. I've been served a great Turkish meal "off the menu" by a proprietor of a Starburger, had fabulous Greek coffee in a plastic looking greasy spoon, great Chinese nosh in a place with a tacky sign...

Anonymous said...

You had a Chinese nosh?

Monkeyboy said...

bit of clarification...never actually eaten in City Noodles. I was taking the mick out of Kate (sorry Kate)

patrick1971 said...

As you lot would know if you had been brought up rather than dragged up, the correct word is "lavatory".

Hugh said...

Papa called it the outhouse. It was at some distance from the rear lawn.

Monkeyboy said...

I used to poo in a plastic bag and chuck it out the cell window when I was doing a five stretch for selling fake law degrees.

Hows the career going Hugh?

Headhunter said...

APP&P - Going to the "bathroom" is horribly American. Like "restroom". Not socially acceptable at all. I would even prefer anon 16:36's suggestion (9th April) than either of these....

Bea said...

My ex-in-laws were Chinese so like a dutiful daughter-in-law I learnt how to cook my husband’s favourite dishes.

With this experience I feel qualified to say that City Noodles does great Chinese food but agree with Kung Fo Hustle that the best “authentic” Chinese food in the area is the Chinese restaurant in the Holiday Inn in Greenwich (near the Odeon & BQ).

Kate said...

IMO, the best 'authentic' Chinese in south east London is Dragon Castle in Elephant & Castle. Absolutely mindblowing place - not cheap, mind, but totally worth it.

Here's the Time Out review:
http://www.timeout.com/london/restaurants/reviews/10798.html

Hugh said...

They invented the internet so strangers could recommend restaurants to each other and be ignored.

lb said...

Personally I'd rather ignore Giles Coren's recommendations, but I'm old-fashioned like that.

I've no idea what 'authentic' Chinese food would be like; everyone I know who's actually been there came back wittering about sea cucumbers, stews made of entrails, that kind of thing. They might have been overdramatising.

Kung Fu Hustle said...

As an authentic Chinese, that sounds about right.

Headhunter said...

I like Chinese food in this country, but I have to say that China is the only country in the world I have visited and resorted to eating MaccyDees and at American hotel restaurants. I did have some nice food there, but I was horribly food poisoned twice.

I have a stomach of iron and will eat anything, anywhere but China did me in! On the other hand, Hong Kong has some amazing places to eat.

I later read somewhere that the cultural revolution killed off the exquisite culinary skills in mainland China as at this time everyone was encouraged to eat brown rice and gruel and till the land like good peasants...

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

2 years ago I did a back packing tour of China from Beijing through the centre to HK.

There was some quite horrific bits in the farmers markets in some of the towns. I saw a dog cut in half, hanging up from the roof, whilst being watched from other live dogs (I think this has something to do with making the live dogs scared - making their meat more tasty). I didnt quite understand that.

Other things I saw included snacks - Bats, Rats, Scorpions on Sticks. The usual things like snake and turtled being killed.

The bit I hated was actually seeing tables full of ducks/chickens all tied up next to each other gasping for breath (with their mouths open).

Some quite horrific sights.

This needs to be weighted up, people need to eat so it just goes to show how desperate some people are.

Headhunter said...

APP&P - It's probably no worse than some of the conditions in battery and factory farms in the UK! What stopped me eating the local food was simply the food poinsoning...

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

Yes, that was a big problem in our group - 75% of our group got food poisioning at some point during the tour. I was one of the lucky few.

Parts of china are so beautiful though, I would recommend anyone to go to the Guilin /Yangshuo region - please feel free to google image it! Its breath taking.

Anonymous said...

You know, I've quite gone off the idea of 'authentic' Chinese. Gimme the sanitised version and go easy on the endangered species.

Sam said...

Having lived in China and Hong Kong for 7 years, I think the problem with food posioning is usually the plates and chopsticks (and your hands...) than the food itself. You need to make sure you eat steaming hot food and, if you are really keen not to get sick, you need to look at the washing up bowl! If that's cold water, don't eat from small bowls, just eat from the central plate as the hot food will kill any bugs there. And keep your hands scrupulously clean.. I always carried antiseptic wipes but nowadays there's that gel. But the food was great - the best noodles ever in the Tibetan outback, or spicy pork in Sichuan, or Beijing crispy duck, or Shanghai steamed dumplings.. absolutely brilliant food with some bad experiences thrown in.

There are great little Chinese supermarkets on Lee High Road that sell frozen dumplings - just throw them in boiling water and serve with Chinese vinegar and soy sauce. Simple but delicious!

Anonymous said...

who cares what's authentic? the real question is, does it taste nice?

Anonymous said...

I think there's a chinese food factory just off Lee high road too.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

There is a good chinese supermarket brand called 'WIng Yip' (as big in size as sainsburies new cross). I think the nearest one is next to Ikea in Croydon. They have a restaurant there too!

lb said...

Hm. Tables full of things gasping for breath - sounds like most central London restaurants, the amount of seating they try and cram in.

Kung Fu Hustle said...

There's a large Chinese Supermarket near the Sainsbury's in Greenwich - it's just behind the sorting office and called See Woo.

APP&P sounds like you were taken to the 'let's scare the westerner' corner. I have seen this sort of thing in news reports - and dont condone it - but never in the market when I was growing up. If you want some good cuisine try Hunanese - like Szechwan but not quite as spicy.

Also Sam is right - it's all in the utensils - bring your own for a happy stomach - or grow up there.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

What i thought was really odd was seeing an old lady blow torch (i kid you not!) the feet of a dog (which was very stiff so obviously dead).

She didnt want me to take her photo (which i can understand considering) but i have photos, and a video of the other bits i saw there. Maybe i should put them on you tube...

Sam said...

From City Noodles to the diversity of Chinese food sourcing... one last thing I wanted to add on this was that of course the main reason Chinese cooking includes every form of animal available was (and in some places, still is) sheer necessity. China may have had a glory age that preceded the West, but it has always struggled with food security.

Kung Fu Hustle.. do you know anywhere in SE London where I can get (good) guota doufu? a very beijing dish, I know, but a real favourite I crave!

Headhunter said...

Actually I've heard that eating every part of the animal is very healthy. People living in hunter/gatherer style who have to catch any meat they want to eat are loathe to waste anything and benefit from the minerals available in things that we throw away such as cartilage and bone marrow, which are not available in the protein rich muscle/meat of the animal. So next time you get that Tesco value chicken, boil the bones into soup, strip the marrow out for it's iron content and chew the cartilage off the end of the bones!

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

And eat the chicken feet!

max said...

I cooked the snails from my garden once.

Headhunter said...

Max - Did you eat them, or was it just a "scientific" experiment!? I was always taught that UK Garden Snails were poisonous!

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

eww...

lb said...

Snails aren't poisonous, or at least the ordinary garden snail isn't. The problem is they've often fed on poisonous plants or have ingested nasty stuff from lead-based paint etc. You can theoretically get over the issue of the snail's diet by purging them (see here), though why anyone would want to eat snails is beyond me, unless we're suddenly plunged into some kind of Mad Max-style dystopia.

lb said...

By the way, I was referring to the the film, not the Max above.

max said...

Me and two guests, we ate them and we're still here to tell the tale.

I remember me and my guests, eating from the forbidden fruit. A dinner to remember.

You have to leave them in wholemeal bread in a bucket for a couple of days and then another day at least without food, so they clean themselves up. Then you wash them, stir fry some garlic and chilli in extra virgin olive oil, throw them in together with a glass of dry white and cover, leave them for a few minutes then sprinkle with chopped flat parsley and serve.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

So you cook them alive? Poor little things...

max said...

I think that London's back gardens offer less chance of poisonous food for snails than the real countryside does with all the pesticides that are used by farmers.

Headhunter said...

LB - that website is amazing! I didn't know there was so much effort devoted to farming and eating snails! I've had them in restaurants before... Perhaps I should try cooking them at home!

Bea said...

Well last year was a good year for snails with all that rain - they were everywhere - in the bin, on the foot path, perching on railings, munching up my plants ... hope to goodnes that this year will be dryer.

max said...

I think they are food for the gods, much better then prawns.
My purging and cooking method comes from the croatian countryside, I have a house there (it used to be Italy) and people traditionally collects them and cook them like that.
I had my best snails in Granada, they use lots of black pepper and serve them as tapas accompanied by excellent local wine.

Anonymous said...

I always thought the best way to deal with garden pests is encourage a Frenchman to forage in your garden for tasty morsels.

Now it sounds like continental eating habits are catching.

Does make me wonder whether any of these special recipes include slugs. Or are they strictly for the birds?

max said...

Slugs? No thanks. I think I'll stick to snails but shall you ever give them a go then please report here on the outcome.

On the subject, I discovered that garlic powder is a phenomenal natural deterrent against them.

Monkeyboy said...

Max, remember I mentioned participating in that DNA study? See this BBC link. Jolly interesting, I recommend it. Well worth the £100 or whatever it was.

Monkeyboy said...

....yes, bugger all to do with food.

max said...

Hi Monkeyboy, I haven't done it yet but I still want to do it, I must order a kit (or two).
That article is very interesting.
In the South of Italy there are red haired people that are commonly considered genetic heritage of the Norman occupation period that took place at about the same time of the Crusades. My daddy was indeed one such red haired Southern Italian, but in reality his genes could have followed a much more complex route and if I take the test I may discover something I didn't know.

Anonymous said...

Think I'll just have a number 63 instead..

Monkeyboy said...

My test came back strictly southern med as expected. Both parents are Italian and their families hardly left their respective towns (Mum from Arpino, Dad from Roca Priora)

And I don't speak a word of Italian, shocking eh?

Anonymous said...

Clearly the seductive power of South London culture. Welcome to Borg Central - innit.

max said...

Watch out!
Trekkies!

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