Power failure

According to the BBC, Brockley was among the areas hit by power failures today.

Did you notice? If so, has the chaos been greater or less than that brought by the earthquake?

45 comments:

fabhat said...

None on Wickham Rd - and I've been in all day...

Anonymous said...

Live westside and yes - we had a power cut for about 30 mins. Can't say it caused too much disruption other than a few house alarms going off. Saying that maybe they were just being burgled. oh....

JPM said...

I think that happened in Downing Street, a short while ago.

APP&P troll said...

I hope my cats are ok

Anonymous said...

Only non-con areas were affected

fabhat said...

the conservation area has it's own secret power generator, so that the supply of Radio 4 and tea to middle class households is never threatened by the fluctuations of the national grid...

Anonymous said...

If there was a power cut on the dark side, how would anyone know the difference?
Only jokin westsiders, I love you really!

Anonymous said...

People outside of the Conservation Area reported that they had difficulty reading out the prices from the menu at the fried chicken shop due to it losing all its backlighting.

Monkeyboy said...

Interesting Underground fact... the old power station in Greenwich is still in use as an emergency back up in case the Tube loses all power. The tube is powered from it's own network 'Powerlink' and uses the National Grid as a back up. If BOTH those fails Greenwich kicks in.

Also did you know that Greenwich Nautical College (now uni) had it's own nuclear reactor ? scary but true. De-commissioned now of course.

Well not very interesting I admit but thought I'd tell you.

APP&P Troll said...

*Sigh* monkeybaby is that the most exciting think you can think of?

Headhunter said...

Ooh Andy, you bitch....

Actually I find that quite interesting. I find the history of the Tube quite fascinating, along with all the abandoned stations etc... I always wondered what that power station in Greenwich was for. I assume it's the building with the big brick chimneys out the other side of the "village" bit, past the old nautical college. Wasn't there another old power station for the Tube somewhere in the south west?

MIT in Boston, Massachussets also has a nuclear reactor, which is still running. Right in the centre of urban Boston!

Monkeyboy said...

Think it was Lot's Road power station, now disussed. Greenwich is supposed to kick in within 15 mins I believe if all else fails.

Tamsin said...

We were plunged in darkness in Telegraph Hill - rather more than half an hour. The knock on effect is that my cooker then doesn't work even when power is restored until you have re-set the clock - something I have had a mental block about learning how to do!

Early transport was very independent. Not only its own power supply (and I'm sure you are right about the other power station somewhere by the Chelsea embankment) but also the first escalators were specifically designed for the heavy usage envisaged in the London underground. They were totally fit for purpose and did not break down or wear out for over half a century, unlike the newer, off-the-shelf, ones which break down, comparatively speaking, much more frequently. Likewise, the Routemaster, although awful for the driver and useless for disabled access, was designed for the London streets and did the job brilliantly. I find it highly amusing that there were more break-downs with the bendy buses in the first six months than there were in six decades of Routemasters.

Brockley Nick said...

Lots Road is currently a construction site - it's being redeveloped as a retail and residential site, with new river access.

Brockley Kate said...

Hmmm I was wondering why Dandelion Blue had the lights off yesterday ...

Headhunter said...

Lots Road... That's it. So it's been demolished has it...?

Interesting about the escalators. they used to have wooden grips on the surface didn't they? Removed after the Kings X fire distaster I think. When I was in Japan, students of mine who had been to London absoluetly loved the fact that we had wooden escalators. For them it went hand in hand with the Queen, afternoon tea, men in pin stripes and bowler hats and then general traditional image of London...

Oh no - we haven't got another deli closure panic on our hands?!

Tom said...

HH - I think I almost hit you on my bike this morning! Someone looking like you blasting down Ashby Road/Vulcan Road. Me, dozily coming out of UBR.

If not, then hey.

Been meaning to reply on the Herne Hill bike thing - you can hire one of theirs. Is worth a go, even it's just the once.

And to get the thread back on track, here's a nice bit on Greenwich power station.

Headhunter said...

Oh was that you, Tom? I think I remember someone coming out of UBR as I came down the hill, however the morning commute merges into one in my mind usually so I can never be sure what happened on a specific day!

I was wearing a dark green t shirt, black helmet and grey/black baggy cycling shorts. I would have said hello but I don't really know what you look like! I think I only got to see the back of your head at the Jam Circus drinks...

Interesting link about the power station. I thought it was disused too, but I've never been up close, just seen it looming over the college and my gym.

If you can hire a bike I'll have to give it a go sometime. Been a bit busy recently though, was intending to go out on a long one with Dulwich Ps last Sun, but the weather was so awful I went for Sunday lunch and beer at the Amersham Arms instead

Tom said...

yep that was me, and you were indeed you! that has to be the briefest meet-up ever ...

almost as random as meeting my next door neighbours for the first time on a Dulwich P ride!

amersham arms ... better than the royal albert for a sunday lunch?

APP&P Troll said...

I woke up at 5am this morning for my bike ride to work... didnt happen - I had a client event last night and was still hung over.

Thought it wouldn't be a good idea, is there any rules with regard to drink bike-riding?

creepylesbo said...

I noticed (in Telegraph Hill) - my bloody video turned off so I missed Springwatch and my CD player was doing a mental - pulling draws and tape slots in and out over and over. Must have driven the pets crazy all day.

Tamsin said...

Of course - Lots Road. I'm sorry its now a demolition site and soon to be glitzy riverside appartments. There was an auction house there I always meant to visit more than once (if ever I had a mansion to furnish) - Sothebys without the expensive glamour.

fabhat said...

Tamsin: lots road auction house is still functioning (i think) - there is still a website, which says something...
AP&P: like a boat, horse or pram, riding a bicycle under the influence is not legal...
Tom: I think the Royal Albert does a nicer lunch (esp the fish) but the last time I went smelt of bad drains...rather off putting.

Headhunter said...

Amersham Arms Sun lunch is v good actually. If you get there before 1pm it's only a fiver. They get their meat from Wellbeloved Butchers and it's very tasty. They serve you the meat and you can help yourself to as much as you like of a selection of veggies, roast pots and Yorkshire pud. It's generally nicely done, the veggies still have some crunch rather than soft and boiled to death and the beef is usually slightly pink in the middle. Never been to the Royal Albert for Sun lunch. Is it good?

I don't think there are any specific rules re drink riding. The police can't stop and breathalise you, however if they saw you weaving all over the road after a heavy night on the ale putting other road users at risk, they probably wouldn't drive on by!

Anonymous said...

My friend was arrested years ago on the specific charge of being "drunk in charge of a bicycle".

Brockley Kate said...

By the way, did anyone else get woken up by the thunder and lightening last night?

I love stormy nights in Brockley!

Headhunter said...

Yeah, it was pretty loud. I expected floods this morning. I woke up a few times in the night and every time I woke I could hear the rain sheeting down...

APP&P Troll said...

Yes, I woke up a few times. I recently discoved that my 'down pipe' from my guttering was blocked. I have a water stain in my front bedroom now, and I was worried about it last night!

One of the delights of living in a victorian house I guess.

Monkeyboy said...

At last something I actually know about.

The new escalators are only very loosly based on comercial designs, they are esentially bespoke. The reason so many are out of action is that they are being refurbished or replaced. Nostalgia is a great thing but can distort your perspective, having spoken to Lift & Escaltor engineers the new ones are at least as robust as the old ones. They are used far more heavily now though - more passengers - so not sure if you get the same life out of them. The escaltors at Victoria are the bussiest in the world, not a lot of people know that.

We are now using 'condition monitoring' basically we have all sorts of gizmos that monitor bearing temperature, vibration, shaft discplacement. An alarm sounds when something looks sick so it can be replaced BEFORE it breaks.

Headhunter said...

Well it's good to know that I won't be plummeting into a hole when an escalator breaks down on the Tube with all the gizmos monitoring it.

Now that Metronet's gone down the toilet, is the station refurbishment plan still going ahead? Some Tube stations out there are absolutely abominable with complete sections of missing tiles, wires hanging and damp stains on the concrete.

Also I noticed that the industrial look metal lining to some of the walkway and escalator tunnels for the "new" stations on the Jubilee line is already starting to rust and decay. It's only been 7 or 8 years!

APP&P Troll said...

The fabulously wealthy private consortium groups responsible for maintainence are probably counting on that!

Never trust a private company, unless its my one.

Here is an interesting fact, did you know you can actually create an 'unlimited' company?

Monkeyboy said...

My last word or It'll be Metronet blog...

The stations programme is being rehashed - some are goin ahead some ain't. The stations started will be finished though. They were always going to look a bit rough during the refurb though, LUL accept that because you only have 3hrs or so a night to do much actual work so in can be left looking a little grim in the meantime! Water ingress is an issue, the station fabric is often 100 years old and the victorians just accepted the odd leak. It's very hard to control. The accepted method is to manage the water leaking in rather than stoping it altogether, thats just not cost effective.

Still TfL are in charge now so obviously things will be in time and too budget....just like the Jubilee line was when that managed that.

Headhunter said...

I see. Gawd, why oh why was Metronet ever invented?! If TfL did such a good job of the Jubilee Line, then why use a hugely expensive private consortium which basically made a bunch of private business owners wealthy for nothing and then went bancrupt?! Anyway, you'd beter not answer that or we'll be in trouble for diverting the conversation from it's original topic

Brockley Kate said...

One of the more bizarre things I've done in my journalistic career is spend a night down the tunnels with the tube maintenance guys. (I had to be track safety qualified before I could do it ... still got by ID card proving it!)

It was really fascinating, but it is such a frustrating job because (as Monkeyboy says) they have such a tiny window of time each night in which to actually do the work. And the conditions are, predictably, dreadful.
Wages are low so a lot of them live several hours' drive from London and commute.

What I learned about tube maintenance is that it would be far more efficient to shut down a line and work on it 24-7 for a period of weeks or months than try and struggle on with this silly 3-hour business. It simply isn't going to keep pace with the work that needs doing.

Monkeyboy said...

Ahhh....Kate, I think I'm in love.

Metronet and I think Tubelines did bid on the basis of closing lines but TfL threw out that idea. We did close the W&C line and saved a packet....did open a few days late but nothing too horrific.

(although I may disagree about the wages, the skilled guys are on a good rate but the cleaners and lower grades are paid shite money)

And the Jubilee Line was said with heavy sarcasm. It was horrendously over budget and would have been very late if LUL didn't ask Bechtel (big scary American project management company who essentially run Tublines) to step in and save them. Was to cost £900m and finally cost £3.5bn.

And also remember that Metronet/Tublines/TfL all use the same Engineering companies. It's how their managed and the contract between the parties that dictates things.

Really, REALLY my last word

APP&P Troll said...

Its funny you mention that Kate, thats exactly what Ken wanted to do as an alternative to the PPP all those years ago.

It made sense to me too.

APP&P Troll said...

Its funny you mention that Kate, thats exactly what Ken wanted to do as an alternative to the PPP all those years ago.

It made sense to me too.

APP&P Troll said...

Its funny you mention that Kate, thats exactly what Ken wanted to do as an alternative to the PPP all those years ago.

It made sense to me too.

APP&P Troll said...

and i didn't drink a coffee all day...

Tamsin said...

On the subject of escalators, let me share with you why when you have three functioning there are always two going up and one going down. Nothing to do with rush-hour flows or the fact that it is more knackering to climb up the stairs than run down them. It is that when passengers are delivered to the foot of an escalator they arrive in bursts as the trains disgorge (extra heavy traffic), whereas those arriving at the top do so in a relatively steady flow.

Contrary to appearances sometimes, these things are thought through.

Monkeyboy said...

This is the latest idea that Boris has for increasing throughput on escalators. He's not as daft as people think.

Brockley Kate said...

MB - It was a while ago that I had my little adventure, so wages might have changed since then!

I found it incredibly wasteful in terms of man-hours - people would commute a fairly long distance to get to an 8-hour shift, spend time waiting to start, then have to spend a long time getting to the specific site they were working on (ie. long walk down a tunnel), set up, manage about 3 hrs' work (and that's on a good day), then have to pack up again and exit the tunnel with time to spare to avoid disrupting the morning service.

It was almost farcical and the cost doesn't bear thinking about. I'd far, far rather they shut a line at a time for however long it takes, and if Londoners knew how wasteful the current system is, I think most of them would agree.

(Hmmm, perhaps I should do a post on my personal blog about the top 5 most bizarre things I've done in the course of my career ...)

Anonymous said...

just note :) Lots road power station closed 21st Oct 2002. i know it was me who shut down the last turbine. London underground is now supplied by the grid, greenwich power station generates electricity to the gris as well, there is no system called 'powerlink' that is the firm that owns it. Greenwich has 7 rolls royce avon gas turbines generating 15 Mw each. Just some useless information for you :)

Monkeyboy said...

....another note. Powerlink does exist, it a contract between LUL and EDF to supply electricity to the underground but yes it uses much of national grid infrastructure. But It has it's own substations dotted around london. I know 'cos I've been in them. Greenwich powerstation is part of the CEPS system (Central Emergency Power Supply) for the underground.

I you've seen an LUL switchroom you'll see a Powerlink supply and a normal EDF supply - stations are dual supplied.

Sorry, just got up so all a bit garbled.

http://www.edfenergy.com/powerlink/showPage.php?name=welcome

ex_lots_road_boy said...

powerlink: Seeboardpowerlink was the consortium name for SEEBOARD, balfour beatty and ABB ( headed by Brian Gray),they were given the responsiblity to upgrade the LUL energy system and shut down lots road. To do this they installed harmonic filters to filter harmonic distortion before connection to the national grid. EDF( a french energy company) only came into the equation after buying SEEBOARD.While the generators at Greenwich are safety back ups they can only move escalators and feed emergency systems, they cannot move trains as they are too slow to respond to fluctuation in traction load. The substation network was part of the original LUL power engineers Dept consisting of a 22Kv ring and a 11Kv rectified down to the DC traction current, many fond memories of maintaining that lot as an apprentice :)

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