Brockley Central moonlighting

We promise this is the last thing connected to our day job that we plug for a good long while, but if you've been wondering why recent entries have been a little light on prose and you're hungry for more, then allow us to introduce C&binet, where we'll be blogging from time to time.

C&binet is a project we've been working on for a while, helping to set up a new network for creative business people, starting with these people. And who's better-qualified to do that than a resident of the creative cluster that is SE4?

Writing for the c&binet blog versus Brockley Central has the advantage that we will actually be working, rather than simply pretending to work while nervously looking over our shoulder.

Although we will have to drop the "Brockley" bit from our pen name, we'll be trying to find a way to crowbar Brockley in to articles about IP protection and new business models for creative content owners. Wish us luck.

53 comments:

Hugh said...

A network for business people? You're having a laugh, Nick.

Brockley Nick said...

Hugh, they said no one could ever create a blog which successfully aggregated brockley news and debate with the deluded ramblings of a mad, cat-obsessed racist and the witty barbs of a PG Wodehouse wannabe and yet here we are.

nobbly brick said...

"not-for-profit"


sounds good...

Anonymous said...

Don't forget lively debate over minicab signage, which, as always "remained TOP of the agenda"

jon s said...

Nice idea, hope it makes creative businesses more effective and they grow to provide more export generated wealth.

Also, it should link up with creative types in old world businesses (commonly called value engineers / value architects) who sit in corporate strategy or strategy consulting firms.

fred vest said...

good grief

Monkeyboy said...

I feel some indignation comming on.

I work in the 'old world' - quiet happy with that given the current climate.

Brockley Nick said...

I don't think it's a new world / old world question. There's nothing new about people making money from art, architecture, music, etc.

Brockley Nick said...

I don't think it's a new world / old world question. There's nothing new about people making money from art, architecture, music, etc.

fred vest said...

what's new is it's commodification i would say

i'd also say that all humans are creative

Brockley Nick said...

Fred, no and yes.

jon s said...

No, its not a new world / old world business issue, but a business and market maturity issue. Technology and outsourcing is shifting creative businesses up the value chain, allowing them to get bigger, employ more people, bring in export money, etc.

Typically what happens in the UK is we lead in new industries (and creatives is one area we do at the moment) but once companies become mittelstad (mid sized companies) they get sold and stop generating UK plc wealth which impact all our standards of living and how bad recessions are in the UK.

All I'm saying is let's help creatives not go down this path.

fred vest said...

nick, so you're saying from the dawning of time, art/music/culture were produced, by it's producers, not for the use value of such things but for their exchange value, i.e. with the express intention of not 'consuming' their products themselves (included within that their families, communities etc..) but to sell them and realise the money form from them instead (i.e. commodity production)

i think most anthropologists and social historians would disagree quite stongly with you on that one

Brockley Nick said...

If your definition of "new" is anything that's happened since the dawning of time, then I suppose you're right.

fred vest said...

nick, what do you read into the fact that copyright law has only existed for two or three hundred years

if the commodification of culture is nothing new then i'm sure copyright laws would have been invented to protect that commodification a lot earlier than they actually were

culture has been produced since the beginning of time but only in the last few hundred years there's been a need to copyright/protect it - this need arose out of the commodification of that culture

but you're right, depending on our definitions of new we're either both right or both wrong

Anonymous said...

Don't speak to Nick like that catman. Have some manners. Take your nastiness to your own blog

fred vest said...

what's the hell is he twittering on about anyway

Monkeyboy said...

Gutted...did I miss my dailey Cat injection?

Actually, can i rephrase that.

fred vest said...

lol

BrockleyBiker said...

If there had been copyright law in ancient times the Greeks and Romans would have have had a right barney.

The Cat Man said...

We had law in the UK arising from pre-roman times - Alfred the Great springs to mind - its where the definition of 'outlaw' comes from, i.e. a person was said to be 'outwidth the protection of law' so people could even kill them to get vengence if they were said to be 'breaking the law'.

not as sophisticated as copyright law, but you get the picture.

Monkeyboy - my dear cult member, come here let me give you an injection.

jon s said...

Fred

There is a reason anthropolgy is used to analyse pre-industrial societies, which had people in lower concentrations (hence far simpler social structures) and lower life expectency. Every time an anthropologist or social historian blunders into analysis of the modern day, they get whomped by political scientists and good sociologists. But anthropology appels to the man on the clapham onmibus due to its oversimplifications.

Postindustrial societies have moved on (and are by no means perfect) and part of the reason for our increased standards of living is property rights. Can it go too far when monopolies exist, absolutely, but we sort of meander along going too far in one direction and then another.

max said...

QED

Tressilliana said...

'We had law in the UK arising from pre-roman times - Alfred the Great springs to mind... '

Surely this is a wind-up. Alfred the Great lived roughly from 849AD to 899 AD. I think you will find that the Roman Empire ended some four hundred years earlier.

jon s said...

Copyright laws only evolve (or are recognised) when your country has companies Who export and don't want their products ripped off. Watch China over the next few years.........

The Cat Man said...

Hmmm. ok.

I was getting my anglo-saxon settlements mixed up. In winchester, there was an anglo-saxon settlement prior to the romans arriving. Well, thats what I thought anyway.

Maybe Alfred the Great came later then, but he is often said to be the first 'anglo saxon' king.

Anyone want to google the timeline pls?

fred vest said...

jon s- indeed, and commodification and exports (as well as property rights) go hand in hand, they both reinforce each other, which is the point being made, i.e. that in the scheme of things they are relatively new, or to be more precise they are not a natural phenomena

(ps have you ever made one post without mentioning the word export)

Tressilliana said...

OK, basic English history. There's a certain irony that someone so keen on Englishness and English values should be so confused about early English history, and that I, as a Scot, should be posting this. However:

4000 BC - homo sapiens arrives for the first time in what is now the British Isles - not isles then as most, if not all, of it, was part of the continent of Europe. Later the sea levels rose and we were cut off. I don't think anybody knows what the ethnicity of these first Britons was.

500 BC approx - the Celts arrive and colonise virtually the whole of the British Isles.

Early 1st century AD - the Romans invade and subjugate the Celts in what is now England and bits of Wales. They don't make much headway in Scotland or Ireland.

Round about 400 AD the Romans leave as the Empire starts to collapse.

Over the next couple of centuries the Angles, Saxons and Jutes move into Britain from the Germanic-speaking areas of Europe. This is the first time English is spoken in Britain - prior to this people spoke various Celtic languages and Latin.

By 597 AD England is becoming a Christian country.

The Anglo-Saxon period lasts to 1066 AD. I assume you know what happened then - the Norman invaded and England became a country ruled by French speakers.

Tressilliana said...

I wonder if you were perhaps thinking of King Arthur - mythical Celtic king, whose legend goes way back before the historical figure of King Alfred arrives on the scene. King Arthur is supposed to have fought against the Saxon invaders in the early 500s.

Tressilliana said...

...so King Arthur isn't pre-Roman either.

I'll shut up now.

jon s said...

Fred,

Depends on your definition of natural. As societies mature we evolve socially and need more complex social norms, e.g. separation of powers, constituions, (we've moved on from a Viking Tind), the rule of law, etc.

Monkeyboy said...

All depends how far you want to go back, we're all Africans really...

https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/

Had my DNA tested, I'm proper southern european me.

State the obvious said...

People forget that some bloke called Jesus was around in Roman Times, which I'm told is roughly 2008 years ago.

max said...

A very early example of franchise.

drakefell debaser said...

Oh dear catman, Abraham Lincoln once said ‘Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt’

It’s tenuous admittedly as he was American and certainly not pre roman either, just in case you were wondering.

Anonymous said...

We're all africans, apart from catman of course.

drakefell debaser said...

Lizards.

Hugh said...

Do many fit birds turn up to these networking gigs? You know, 23, leggy, straight outta St Martin's.

max said...

St martin's the homeless institution?

The Cat Man said...

Who cares about fit birds, bring on the hunky fitness obsessed studs.

Monkeyboy said...

DB, don't joke about the lizards. There was a suspicious looking gecko hanging around the station, I think he may be tailing me.

I may call the poli....ARRGHHHH!!! NOT THE LONG STICKY TONGUE!!!!

Monkeyboy said...

...It's OK. It was only the bloke wanting to read the meter.

Anonymous said...

You do realise that for the past two millenia, until very recently, Western music (i.e. European, not music for gunslinging films) was produced on order, either for the church or for the wealthy upper classes who then 'owned' it...? That would seem to be a more unfair commodification than that in the current situation, where at least the musicians profit and are given credit for their own products...?

Finbar Saunders said...

Talking of fit birds, I going to Erotica 2008 tomorrow at Olympia.

Anyone been in previous years and if so is it any good?

Hugh said...

I don't think they held Erotica 2008 in previous years.

Anonymous said...

You can just see Hugh in a social situation feeling awfully pleased with himself with that last comment. Everyone else taking a sip of their drink and thinking 'pompous c**t'

nobbly brick said...

cult?

drakefell debaser said...

I find myself following peoples heels when coming out of the station at the moment MB. I must learn to resist.

Hugh said...

Pompous c**nts are underrated, in my view.

Tressilliana said...

Chants?

Hugh said...

Caants.

toshy said...

Nice username Finbar

C@binet sounds good, but
1. it's a nightmare to google
2. inviting people to 'add us to your social networking groups' and then only having a Flickr group with one person and NO PHOTOS is kinda shoddy

Apart from that, good luck. With so many reasons for people to start small, creative businesses (the complete lack of imagination that means the majority of existing workplaces seem to find it impossible to adapt to a changing culture, for instance, and the lack of interest in mass-produced products that's inevitably going to increase as a result of the recession) I reckon it has a lot of potential. But the website definitely needs a bit more work. (on a purely aesthetic level, I'd start by changing that intro font to the font used on the rest of the site.)

Tamsin said...

Heny I was the one who really pulled the law together although William the Conqueror made a good start. Before them, if you were an "outlaw" it was simply a matter of skipping thirty miles or so to a new area where there were people who never heard of you and trying to start again. Afterwards you had to skip to Wales (an underlying thread in many of the Cafael books).

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