Brockley: There's an App for That

BC reader Mungaloid has posted this in the "suggest a topic" thread:

Thought Brockley residents may be interested in this latest Apple iPhone advert from the back of Shortlist this morning (check out the 'Unlike London' app description for a wee mention of The Rivoli).

Which begs the question... what would a Brockley Central app do?

67 comments:

Headhunter said...

Serious fame at last!

Anonymous said...

Better than being on the tube map...almost.

Danja said...

Down's Syndromaloid would be more polite, but perhaps even less funny.

Anonymous said...

Not very nice. I'd appreciate less of that thanks.

Danja said...

Do you think that may have been the point, perhaps?

Headhunter said...

MUNGaloid means nothing though...

Anonymous said...

If it was you missed it.

ajnad said...

Danja stop being a stirrer.

Danja said...

I'm not stirring, I think it is very poor taste and I'm surprised Nick adopted it in an article.

Stop being obtuse HH, it is clearly a 'pun'.

Brockley Nick said...

@Danja - I think I am so blind to mung-related puns now I hadn't even noticed it - it was the name chosen by the poster and I credit stories.

Anonymous said...

you could have objected to it in a way that didn't make another reference to that particular disability. Whatever your intentions I for one would like to see the comments and indeed the article edited. It's not nice.

Anonymous said...

harmless post turned toxic in 11 comments.

Good work people!

Brockley Nick said...

Perhaps the answer to the original question is that a Brockley Central app would provide users with ready-made arguments, on-the-go.

Type a subject in to its unique searchable database and watch it spew out 200 angry talking points.

Anonymous said...

This is like that time when one of the regulars went apes*** about Fred' Vest's name and wifebeater connotations. Obviously it's a serious subject but the pomposity of the comments cracked me up.

Danja said...

Maybe I'm too close to the subject, but I'm not angry, if that's a reference to me. It's just, like I said, really rather tasteless. There is at least one community care home in the catchment area of this blog with residents with Down's Syndrome. It's their n-word.

tyrwhitt ali said...

I just assumed it was a normal mung bean reference.

Anonymous said...

I think making references or a play on words to Down's Syndrome says a lot about the calibre of people who comment on this site. If you don't think it's offensive to use the word Mungaloid which is a clear reference to Mongaloid then the last 25 years must have passed you by.
Unfortunately Danja made further reference to it with his post. Lets just lose the pathetic pun and move on. Neither were funny or clever.

Brockley Nick said...

@Danja - it wasn't a reference to you, no, just the tone that these debates can often take.

The word is one I hardly ever hear and certainly never use and the pun didn't really register with me - nor am I sure that the pun is meant to be an endorsement of the original word's usage.

However, I recognise that it can be very offensive, so I'd encourage people not to use it on here.

Lex said...

I've called the language police and tactical thought squad in; get over yourselves you PC reactionaries. What actual offence was intended/occassioned?

Original poster said...

Sorry all - didn't mean to offend - the reference was to the "mung" theme on this site and not to any particular discrimination to others - although I accept that others may/will have been offended. Sorry :(

Brockley Nick said...

Thank you, much appreciated. I hope that draws a line under the topic.

important question said...

Do we need to get the equalities commission involved?

Anonymous said...

Nah, I think everyone has had their daily fix of unnecessary outrage.

Back to work folks.

The Cat Man said...

I think you guys are about ready for me to say some outlandishly reactive comment to get you all worked up for round 2 of Brocklite angreness!!!

How about it? Whats the chosen topic?

hahahaa said...

LMAO, print screen before Nick deletes it.

Anonymous said...

What a bunch of freakazoids.

Anonymous said...

Any descendants of Gengis Khan live in the catchment area?

Anonymous said...

Danja is a bloke?!!!
Soundz like a beeeyatch!

Matt-Z said...

Any fans of Devo around?

Anonymous said...

they are alright but i preferred Kraftwerk.

Hugh said...

It doesn't beg the question. It raises the question. Begging the question is assuming something you're trying to prove. Kids these days.

Monkeyboy said...

Can I be the first to accuse someone of being a Nazi?

mg said...

@Hugh Oooh, that's my big pet peeve, I've given up, just get greeted with blank stares and accusations of pedantry. See also enormity.

Headhunter said...

What begs what question? I can't see anythnig about begging for anything prior to Hugh's comment...

Psssst said...

read the article..

Headhunter said...

Oh.

pedant said...

Yes, the original sense of "begging the question" has been lost almost entirely.

Ditto "shooting oneself in the foot" and the verb "to decimate".

No doubt this kind of pedantry gets up a lot of people's noses but I take comfort in the knowledge that I am not alone in noticing these things...

Brockley Nick said...

Decimate I understand, but how has the original sense of shooting oneself in the foot been lost?

Anonymous said...

hey pedo,

Does the term 'knobhead' still retain any of its original sense?

Eric B and Rakim said...

The English language is like people;

"Its not where you're from, its where you're at...."

Headhunter said...

God. There's a whole Wikipedia page dedicated to begging the question and it even mentions Aristotle....

Anonymous said...

People talk about someone shooting themselves in the foot when that person has accidentally acted against their own interests. Originally (WW1 soldiers) it was a deliberate act to avoid a worse evil.

Tamsin said...

Yes, but it is a fun game to play. Like Nick I understand "decimate" but enlightenment on the original and current "shooting oneself in the foot" and "begging the question" would be appreciated.

Headhunter said...

"Shooting oneself in the foot" is pretty straightforward but can someone use "begging the question" in a sentence? I understand that it means you are assuming a point that should be proved but I can't quite work out how it would fit in s sentence.

Anonymous said...

In an essay on whether miracles were possible, CS Lewis cited the argument made by some people that miracles were impossible because nothing could happen that was contrary to the laws of nature/physics. He said that this argument began by begging the question.

Hugh said...

The thing about responding to having your solecisms pointed out by saying (a) "What is this, and English lesson?" or (b) "Usage has changed" is:

(a) yes, it's an English lesson;

and

(b) no it hasn't. You just can't admit being wrong. Education can help.

Hugh said...

Let me get the apology in first for the typo!

Anonymous said...

PS to clarify (as Hugh says, it's assuming something you're trying to prove/disprove):

Q Is it possible that something could happen contrary to the laws of nature?

A No, because nothing can happen that is contrary to the laws of nature.

The answer begs the question.

Hugh said...

"God is unknowable."

That's another classic as it rather defeats any attempt to disprove he exists or otherwise show him to be a plonka.

Anonymous said...

Homework:

Write a sentence which correctly uses each of the following words or phrases:

i beg the question
ii shoot yourself in the foot
iii decimate.

On my desk Monday morning please.

Brockley Nick said...

@Hugh - interesting you use the term plonker (sp) - a slang term that has evolved over time.

Language does evolve of course, to deny that is to make a plonker of yourself.

However, hands-up to my ignorance of the begs the question point, thanks for correcting me.

The derivation of decimate means that its meaning ought to be pretty much fixed, so I agree that misuse of that term is just poor English. But "shooting yourself in the foot" is a metaphor that can be interpreted in different ways and the fact that it is more popularly used to describe a self-defeating act suggests that that is the most evocative interpretation.

You wouldn't make a good poet if you insist that a metaphor can only have one meaning.

Anonymous said...

Zounds, Hugh, th'art very nice! What canst thou mean by thy assertion that language usage changeth not?

Have some self respect said...

Poets break rules because they have a complete understanding and mastery of said rules.

I can't stand people that relish being ignorant. Dumbed down culture is sh1t.

Anonymous said...

Off my own back I'm going through this thread with a fine tooth comb looking for mistake's.

Doh - have I shot myself in the foot?

Or not........?

Monkeyboy said...

I hope Hugh isn't charging some hapless client by the hour while he's pissing his time away on here.

Brockley Nick said...

"Dumbed down culture is sh1t".

How high-culture of you!

You will use expressions every day in conversation without knowing their original meaning or derivation.

Monkeyboy said...

If only we could tax the smug.

troy said...

Wasn't 'shooting yourself in the foot' classed as a 'Blighty wound', i.e., an act of deliberate self-harm masquerading as an accident that would get you sent home, instead of having to face the terror of going over the top?

Anonymous said...

@troy yes, and so it came to mean deliberately choosing a lesser evil over a greater one, as mentioned already.

Hugh said...

Nick, I spelt it 'plonka' on purpose. I keep it real. I play with language, yeh? But I also am master of it. Can't help the gift, bruvnor.

Hugh said...

And as for all those implying I denied that language changes, no I didn't. I said that responding, as so many people do, to being corrected on misuse of the phrase 'begs the question' by appealing to changing usage just amounts to refusing to admit being wrong. Keep up and we can continue. Admittedly I don't expect much precision from net chatters so I won't hold out for more.

Brockley Nick said...

Save this kind of conversational gold for opening night at The Talbot. Bring your wallet.

Hugh said...

Don't get handbags with me, luv.

Tamsin said...

Right, so shooting yourself in the foot used to mean deliberately choosing the lesser evil but now is more like being hoist by one's own petard - un-intentional damage to one's own interests?

Never come across it in the former sense at all, but interesting.

My understanding of a "blighty" was that it was any slight wound - not necessarily self inflicted. The shorthand for these being was "SIW".

Pete said...

The pun never even crossed my mind. The fact that some people are so upset by it maybe says more about them than it does about anyone else.

Danja said...

That may have been simply a mildly fatuous observation that the things people say says things about them (the fact that you say it did not cross your mind does of course say more about your mind than about anyone else's).

Or, you were being more ambitious and trying to say that the fact that it did not cross your mind means that anyone for who it did must be wrong in some sense.

If the latter, that is a lovely example of begging the question.

Which raises the question, was it deliberate?

I suspect not.

Danja said...

That was meant to be 'whom', before Hugh senses blood.

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