Boulevard Shardeloes


Given that Brockley has embraced cafe society so thoroughly, it was perhaps inevitable that our roads would become boulevards.

Some new street trees have been planted on both Shardeloes Road, creating an effect which one BC poster described as 'boulevardisation'.

So here's Boulevard Shardeloes. As they're immature trees, you might need to click on the photo to see them!

72 comments:

Anonymous said...

The council are doing same on Saint Asaph Road. Residents were consulted about it sometime last November if I recall correctly. I like it.

Mezzer said...

That'll be really nice in a few years - both for the streetscape and for the residents of the houses overlooking the road.

brockleybiker said...

It's a funny road Shardloes as technically it is a minor road, when it actual fact in operates more like a B road.

Trees should look nice.It's a bit bare along there.

mintness said...

Mm, it is a bit odd looking on the map and seeing that Malpas rather than Shardeloes is the B road. Probably because the buses go down the latter, I suppose.

Hugh said...

To quote Marc Almond:

Isn't that...you on the screen?

Tamsin said...

Yes, but these ones do look as if they have been put in on the basis that a certain number of trees had to be planted by the end of the year to meet an arbitrary target (which sounds like a pun but was not intended as such). The job was simply not thought through. Roll forward 40 or even 20 years and think how they will look planted so close together... Bear in mind that the wall, which is now (since the ELL extension) the last surviving remnant of the old canal, already has that fantastic piece of public art commissioned by the Broc. Soc... Think also that this is a route for double-decker buses and silver birches bush out quite low down.
Also, replacement trees have been promised for the gaps in the original plantings around Telegraph Hill - but these have not been forthcoming - too difficult a job. Hence my modified rapture.
(If you have a sense of deja vu it's because I've cut and pasted this comment from the Orchard thread - which went off on a tangent - or boulevard - down Shadeloes.)

brockleybiker said...

"the last surviving remnant of the old canal"

Ah that explain why the road is so strange looking. I thought it was odd to have the houses arranged like that but if they were backing onto water that makes more sense.

Trees are good said...

Tamsin the potential problems you've sited are not insurmountable. As we know, if a tree causes any problems whatsoever, it's chopped down. So for the time being, i'm enjoying the trees.

Headhunter said...

Always nice to see some new street trees, but I share Tamsin's concern that trees hacked down by the council in Telegraph Hill as well as other parts of Brockley have not been replaced and indeed the spots they were in have been tarmacked over.

Will have to have a closer look but have these trees got the protective frame around them to stop the local yobs breaking them off?

Headhunter said...

As per my comment on the other thread, Malpas Rd is supposed to be a major route from Brockley X to Lewisham Way, that's how the traffic routing was designed, however the rat run cut through route along Geoffry and Wickham Rds have become more commonly used, leaving Malpas, a designated B road, relatively unused...

Tamsin said...

I agree - and I love silver birches (there was a quite beautiful one on Arbuthnot that went at the behest of some insurance company and there is a lovely one near Edmund Waller that has almost coppery bark). My concern is that these are too close together and as such are resources wasted.

@hh on Malpas Road - it is strange that it is the designated B road, though, given that it is so much narrower than Wickham.

Headhunter said...

Yes but access to Wickham Rd from Brockley X means having to drive thruogh the narrow Geoffrey Rd which is lined with residents' cars as well. I suppose that's why traffic is encouraged along Malpas to get to Lewisham Way

treehugger said...

I should be able to get my arms around these!

Mungo said...

We could form a human chain alongside them

co said...

How silly you pair above are.

Brockley Nick said...

@Hugh - yes, the ghost in the shell

Moira said...

I lived on Malpas for nearly 20 years and it isn't a relatively unused road! We too had buses (for a few years) using their shooting brakes, with people on the top deck being able to stare in to your bedroom 10 ft away, plus all the lorries thundering past including Sainsbury and Tesco juggarnauts, and the scaffolding company lorries from the end of Malpas, and the pain of having wing mirrors constantly being broken. It was hell.
PS Tamsin- it was BXAG, not Broc Soc who commissioned the poem.

TreesforLife said...

I think Tamsin Is right,but not just how close they are together,but how close they are to the Kerbs edge,how long before they are disturbed

Headhunter said...

Malpas certainly isn't completely unused, but whenever I go to the PO to pick up a parcel or something during the morning rush hour before work, I head down Geoffrey Rd which is usually log jammed with traffic, then left at Brockley X to the PO, then back along Malpas and left along Vesta Rd. The Malpas Rd stretch of that little journey is easily the most car free bit.

John Moonbow said...

Nerves is not something I suffer walking around at night but I did find walking down Shardoloes from NX, around 11.30 last night, very very eerie

Ed said...

As unPC as this might be I think the poem is guff! Interesting to know Shardeloes was part of the canal though and we need more trees in BX generally.

Sue said...

I think I'm right in saying that these trees have been planted by the Council, but funded by the Mayor of London's street trees scheme (via our taxes of course). There are strict conditions about where the trees funded via the Mayor of London can go, ie parts of Brockley/New Cross that don't already have lots of trees, not the conservation areas, which unfortunately have to wait until there is enough money in the Council's street trees budget to catch up on the replanting backlog, unless the Council chooses to increase that pot as part of the budget-setting process. You can see the Mayor of London's priority planting areas here.

Headhunter said...

Yes, I applied to the Mayor's fund to get a replacement tree for Manor Ave but was told no. So I badgered Lewisham BC (through our councillor) instead and they kindly replaced it.

Anonymous said...

subsidence!

Theychoppedmydaddown said...

How hard would It be for Lewisham Council to have there own nursery for growing saplings.

Anonymous said...

this is a nice idea. but surely the pavement isn't wide enough for these trees...Once matured or even a few years old these trees will make walking along the path or using a pram or a wheel chair rather difficult.

co said...

Everyone's a critic! What's wrong with the poem? It doesn't scan well enough for you? Inconsistent rhyme scheme?

Tamsin said...

Just got home and looked at my 1948 Bartholomews and Malpas (and Shardeloes) used to be tram-routes. I wonder if the road designation arises from this - and goes right back to the houses on Wickham being much bigger and posher (with their own carriages - hence the mews).

On the matter of trams, does anyone by any chance have a recording - preferably DVD - of "The Elephant Will Never Forget" - the 1953 BTF film on the last trams into New Cross Depot? Tried Amazon to no avail and although I've got it somewhere on video that would be a long hunt for rather poor quality that would lose further in translation.

Ed said...

Try the BFI.

Tamsin said...

As I said earlier - trees shoved in without too much thought just to tick the box within a certain time-frame. The usual pattern of wasted opportunities and public money.

Sorry - BXAG - it was, of course, you. And I love the poem! Had it read a couple of years back in the poetry evening at the Festival asking the question of the audience as to where it was to be found (some knew I am glad to say) and linked with the other lovely public art poem in the Waterloo underpass.

Phil said...

I agree with Ed... didn't even recognise it as a poem.

Anonymous said...

philistine?

Tressillian James said...

Bit late to the conversation - and I like the idea of trees along Shardeloes as it improves one of the 'entrances' to Brockley - however when I saw the photo my first thought is that a bus will have them down by the end of theyear.

Anonymous said...

We had a tree taken away in the summer by the council on Chudleigh road which was never replaced. Its now a nice bit of asphalt on the pavement.

Headhunter said...

Yep they do that a lot (remove trees and asphalt the spot). You have to badger them or you local councillor and they seem to replace them eventually.

I don't think the Silver Birches (if that's what they are) on Shardeloes will create much of a problem at pavement level as they grow tall and slender, the trunks don't get very thick. Buses might batter them a bit but again, as they are fairly tall trees with long flexible, willowy branches they may suffer less than trees that bush out with tougher boughs.

Sue said...

@anon: outside what number Chudleigh Road? I think I've already reported one along there, but will check, and as I said the current tree replanting budget doesn't cover all the trees due to be replaced.

The tree officer told me that their plan is to move towards removing problems trees and stumps and replanting all in same day, rather than tarmacing and leaving it for ages.

Anonymous said...

@Sue: The tree that the council took and never replaced was outside No.14 / No.12 Chudleigh road. Cant miss the black asphalt.

Sue said...

@anon Ah,I know where you mean; I chased up about the asphalt several months back and asked for the slabs to be restored (to no avail), but thought it was a utilities botch job rather than a missing tree - will contact the tree officers and check that they have it on the replanting list. Do drop me an e-mail if you want me to forward their response to you.

alfredturningstone said...

I live on Shardeloes Road and it is treated as a main road, particularly byt the police who seem to come tearing up it on a very regular basis.

Anonymous said...

It has humps now, so average speeds will have lowered.

Anonymous said...

No not those humps dont slow speed, they just let there tyres either side of them,they should be right across the road

Anonymous said...

I still think the pavement on Shardeloes Rd needs widening by the poem to allow room for the trees. It should have been widened before the tree planting.

Anonymous said...

I tend to accelerate faster over the "full width of the road" sort to account for the hump!

shardeloes inhabitant said...

(apologies if this takes up too much space but for local history buffs this might be of interest to you).

Shardeloes road canal was built in the 1700s (1711 approx) and cut across St Donatts and dropped down to NXG. The canal opened in the late teens and was used to transport soldiers in the napoleanic war. Built above the water table the canal often leaked, water had to be topped up and it was to maintain often having to plug in leaks. The canal closed approx 1730.

In the 1900s Trams ran along Shardeloes. A neighbout who sadly died last year lived on the road for about 50 years. She told us how she and a neighbour ( across the road) would take it in turns to make hot chocolate and coffee for the tram drivers. They'd stop for a break and have their hot choc before continuing with their journey. This was at the top end of Shardeloes road, lewisham way just after the vets.

In addition, funeral processions (horse drawn) would start at the top of Shardeloes Road (Lewisham Way end) and continue all the way down to brockley cemetary (and camberwell I think) .

Furthermore, last year a woman with her mother aged about 80 years old were driving past our house and stopped when they saw my partner in the garden. She told him that her mother (who was in the car)was born in the house we live in, in 1927. Her father had lived in the house since early 1900s.

My partner invited them in for tea and soon they were talking about the history of the house and area.

My partner asked if we could record her stories using a dictaphone. She agreed and we've ended up with two hours of material providing a firsthand account of what life was like on the street in the early part of the 20th century. recorded two hours worth of the woman's stories of what it was like living on shardeloes Road.

A few weeks later, the 80 year old sent us a book recounting more of her memories and photos of her dad in our (What was his) garden, standing amongst the gladioli he grown standing tall in regimented rows.)

Turns out a bomb landed on the corner of shardeloes road and St donatts and hit a gas main and killing a number of civilians - one sixteen year old girl was killed outside our house.

in 1860 Shardeloes Road used to be a brick works. Houses were first built on Shardeloes Road in about 1964 (ish).

oldtimestorylover said...

Great stories anyway we could hear the tape ? Maybe put It on You Tube.

Shardeloes inhabitant said...

possibly, I'd have to look into it. It wouldn't be that interesting to watch as only audio recording.

Brockley Nick said...

@Shardeloes Resident - this is really fascinating stuff and it's a shame to relegate it to the 44th comment underneath a hastily shot photograph of some trees.

Please feel free to contact me at nick.barron@gmail.com if you want to discuss turning this in to a guest article on the site.

Thanks again for a great post.

Brockley Nick said...

Sorry, inhabitant, not resident.

Shardeloes inhabitant said...

You're welcome. Although I can't take the credit myself. It's down to my partner getting our neighbours beyond the obligatory "good morning" on the way to work.

I've simply summarised some of the conversations he's had over the past few years.

There's probably a wealth of rich local history on most streets around here - if we only took the time to get to know long-term residents.

I'll have a word with to email you to discuss further. I fear I may have surmised all the interesting bits.

Tamsin said...

On local oral history, there's a lady living in the White House Sheltered Housing in Kender Street who is 102 (although she looks 30 years younger) and recalls the newspaper boys announcing the outbreak of War in 1914 etc. If anyone had contacts with local schools and could intiate a project to capture her memories it would be well worth doing.

When they moved house it cost £1 for the cart-hire, 1s for the driver and 1d for oats for the horse. (I suppose the equivalent of leaving the tank as you find it>)

OldTimeStoryLover said...

There was an old boy who lived In Elswick Road off Lewisham Way who could remember Queen Victoria Going up Lewisham Way In a Carriage.And the Rising Sun Pub let him have all free drinks when he reached 100 for the rest of his life.Take note Brockley Pubs.

Tamsin said...

Why Queen's Road is Queen's Road - she used to come to see Albert who at the time was going through the usual Royal Services induction, receiving Naval officer training at Goldsmiths - which was then part of the Naval College.

Sue said...

@anon 8 Jan 14:12: Good news! Just heard back from the tree officers and they said that the missing tree outside 12-14 Chudleigh Road is on their list to be replaced this Spring.

Anonymous said...

I would really like to get trees planted on our road. How do I go about that?

Brockley Nick said...

@Anon - the Mayor's scheme asked Londoners for suggestions online a while back. For trees funded from money from localities fund (Lewisham Council cash) your best bet is to go along to a Local Assembly meeting - the last one I went to, they were asking attendees for nominations.

Anonymous said...

thanks. I nominated my road for the mayors tree scheme but it wasn't allocated any trees.
Guess I'll have to come along to a meeting.

Brockley Nick said...

Even if they're not asking for nominations, bend the ear of the officer running the Assembly meeting and I'm sure they'll pass it on.

Monkeyboy said...

On free drinks for Centurions... I read a scary stat a few months back. If you were born around now there is a 50% you'll live to at least 100. A tribute to modern medicine (not crystal waving) but society needs to change rapidly - hug an old person today, they'll be running the gaff in a few years.

Headhunter said...

Who would ever want to live that long from now? By 2110 we'll have completely f*cked the environment. Norfolk and other parts of the UK will be under the sea placing more pressure on available land. Large swathes of Africa will be uninhabitable creating huge numbers of climate refugees and enormous numbers of plant and animal species will have been wiped out, possibly including bees, leading to enormous problems producing enough food for the ever burgeoning world population.

Politicians will never get their *rses together to ever create meaningful global policy to protect us from this ever more likely outcome. Just look at the wasted opportunities at Kyoto and Copenhagen. We also wasted a long time with George W in the White House meaing the US, the world's biggest consumer of global resources has been carrying on regardless.

Quite frankly I don't envy the next generation our legacy...

Anonymous said...

Or alternatively, it'll be a degree or so warmer and everyone will get on with their lives.

The mungpocalypse isn't certain.

Headhunter said...

It's not certain but ever increasingly likely. Even 1 degree warmer isn't good news. It will probably be 1 degree warmer but much wetter and greyer. The UK isn't about to become the Algarve!

Tamsin said...

UK potentially colder and wetter if we lose the benefits of the Gulf Stream.

I am rather glad I won't be around in thirty years time.

On the other hand, given that the present young people have a vested interest in the future of the planet maybe something will be hauled back from the brink. The rather flawed premise behind the conclusion of "The Trouble with Lichen".

Headhunter said...

Yes, some people believe if the Gulf Stream cuts out, the UK's weather will resemble something like the northern provinces of Canada (but wetter and greyer). So all is yet to be seen, but as time ticks by and nothing is done, change, and not for the better, is increasingly certain.

Many seem to believe that if nothing is done in a matter of years, we'll pass that tipping point and no matter how future generations attempt to save themselves, the process will be irreversible with factors like sea rises triggering further reactions which in turn trigger more carbon release etc etc.

Anonymous said...

I suspect the most that will happen will be that todays Climate Change faddists will move onto some other worthy obsession by then, be it Free Range Eggs or Cluedo

Headhunter said...

And it's that sort of attitude in the face of what could turn out to be a catastrophe on a global scale that could make disaster a reality. Thank god you haven't got any real power.... Actually come to think of it perhaps you have. Were you in Copenhagen a few months back?

Anonymous said...

Anybody here doing 10:10?

Tressilliana said...

I think the chances of us cutting our emissions by 10% in a year with such a prolonged cold spell as this are pretty slim. We don't have a car, can't afford much in the way of holidays, do a fair bit of recycling - doesn't leave much scope.

wannabe 10:10er said...

I have to say it is tough, I have really upped the recycling, cut down but intend to stop using supermarkets plastic bags- no more unplanned shopping. Have turned down the thermostat to as low as I can stand. Will be getting draft proofing for the sash windows.
I've been bringing lunch in but you end up using more gas than you would if you bought lunch out...so swings and roundabouts.

angelofthewest said...

that's just the problem with campaigns like 10-10. Not a fatal flaw, but, a fly in the ointment certainly. People who care about the environment and believe in personal responsibility, are already doing a lot; there isn't a lot of "discretionary" carbon footprint to cut, and 10% might not amount to much anyway. Now if my brother-in-law could even manage 5-10, the climate change scientists would be scratching their heads for years, wondering where all that extra ozone came from.

Anonymous said...

More climate change this morning chaps. Wrap up warm.

John Moonbow said...

This is great shardeloes inhabitant and OldTimeStoryLover, if you are able to share this info it may fit in nicely with a project that is being planned for the Brockley Max this year. Let me know? More info on the event later in Jan.

Cheers

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