Brockley Mess applies for license

For some time, The Brockley Mess has been flirting with the idea of opening later in the evenings and is now applying for a license to serve alcohol.

The move makes sense, particularly as its growing its reputation as a gallery space.

The site operated as a bar / cafe until 2009, when Moonbow Jakes closed and the residents of midtown Brockley are currently without a drinking option on their doorstep, so it should be an uncontroversial application.

Specifically, here's what they're hoping for:

  • Sale of alcohol on the premises 1200 – 0000 Monday – Saturday 1200 – 2230 Sunday.
  • Regulated entertainment films & recorded music 0900 – 0000 Monday – Saturday 1000 -2230 Sunday.
  • Live music 1200 – 0000 Monday – Saturday 1200 – 2230 Sunday.
  • Provision for dancing 1800 – 0000 Monday – Saturday 1800 – 2230 Sunday.

51 comments:

Mung Mum said...

But what about the poor kiddywinkles?

Anonymous said...

Give them a little glass of Scotch,and they will sleep like a log.

Anonymous said...

Gin is more traditional.

patrick1971 said...

Only people I think who could be unhappy would be the flats above that row of shops; I'm not sure I'd be keen on live music if I lived there. All the rest sounds great.

When I went there, though, it seemed way to light and bright to be an evening drinking space; will be interesting to see if they can make it work. Good luck to them.

Anonymous said...

Will be great to have them open in the evenings - hopefully the lighting will be muted....

Anonymous said...

Not sure how the staff will resolve their skittish behaviour - triggered- when people walk anywhere near the art, with drunk people.

Anonymous said...

Great, another evening option for Brockley. I recently met up with some friends, for drinks, at The Orchard. One of whom was considering Brockley as his next move, but thought maybe there weren't enough places to go out for a drink locally. So one more is good in my book.

Anonymous said...

I like the 'midtown' description - will make my end-of-commute homeward trudge up Brockley Road feel a little more like I'm strolling up Fifth Avenue

Anonymous said...

That will be a welcome addition.

Now all we need in 'midtown' Brockley is somewhere to get fresh fruit and veg.

Anonymous said...

Glad to see someone making an effort instead of throwing in the towel. A little imagination and effort is much appreciated. Best of luck to them. I'll certainly be giving my support.

Anonymous said...

"Now all we need in 'midtown' Brockley is somewhere to get fresh fruit and veg."

There's a grocer two doors away from Corals betting shop. It's been there for about four years. It doesn't have a twee shopfront though so you might not have noticed it.

Anonymous said...

I'm confused, on the few times I've been there people have been drinking. Is/was it BYO?

Anonymous said...

Superfoods - no twee shopfront, but nowt fresh neither

Tamsin said...

Interesting development I've noticed in the past year - convenience store type shops putting trestles out on the pavement with scoops of fresh fruit and veg. market style for a pound a go. Presumably the same enterprising wholesaler has put them up to it but the ploy deserves to be successful. Maybe one of the ones in "midtown" Brockley might take it up.

BTW Nick, ignored it for a day but can do so no longer, sorry to carp but "licence" with a "c" if it's the noun - the "s" is the verb. Only applies to British English, so an Amercian grammar/spell checker would not work. (And a tip for nothing - applies to other pairs as well - e.g. practice/practise - and one can remember which way round it is by thinking of "advice" and "advise" where there is actually a difference in pronunciation.)

Monkeyboy said...

Yes, the shops in Deptford Market do the £1 scoop thing. Have to watch it though, sometimes the veg is a little ripe although that can actually be a good thing.

Hugh said...

The word is 'licence'.

Are degrees worth the name the days?

Hugh said...

ok, these ;)

Anonymous said...

"are degrees worth the name the days"
Obviously not!!

Anonymous said...

@anon 22.03

It was I who said we needed fresh fruit and veg in 'midtown' Brockley.

I'm well aware of the fruit and veg graveyard to which you refer. If there was anything fresh in there I'd be a regular. I can only assume they buy the leftovers from elsewhere.

Monkeyboy said...

Use'Permit' saves a lot of agro innit?

Anonymous said...

...appropriately located opposite the cemetery.

Hugh said...

I like the ELL countdown clock.

Anonymous said...

Yeah but watch It Hugh, If they fall behind,they might wind It back like a dodgy car salesman.

Anonymous said...

Hugh's face is like a pot of Moutarde de Dijon.

Tamsin said...

@ anon 11.02 How fresh do you want stuff! It sounds as if you need to go to the supermarkets who have purchasing and distribution all sewn up, and stuff packed in vacuum bags with whatever fancy gas is used to make it keep.

Mark you, I talk as someone whose work colleague used to regularly bring in carrots that she regarded no longer crisp enough to be given to the horses at New Lodge but, if I forgot or was not going there that week, I would happily use them myself. If they are being cooked a bit of flabbiness does not matter and any of that black mould old carrots get comes off with the peel.

Anonymous said...

remind me never to come to yours for supper.

Tamsin said...

Well if guests are involved I would probably draw a line at acutally mouldy carrots. It is the sad fact of my up-bringing. My father was a POW and my mother's childhood was to the mantra "think of the starving Russians". You do not throw away food that is still usable.

Nux said...

Ooh look, off topic but just saw this

http://www.global-research.net/oea/categories.asp

Observer Ethical retailer awards and you can vote for a local business - maybe we could all rally behind the Broca Food Market?

Nux said...

Also, while I'm being off topic, a new internet cafe has opened up in Crofton Park, it's where Barrio Latino used to be and it's called Aladdin's Cave, it is supposed to be luxurious and it has very regal looking furniture. For all the laptop users being driven out of the Mess by the hundreds of babies, this could be the answer :-)

Cherry Darling said...

What about all the people who actually want to socialise with lunch and a cup of coffee being driven out by hundreds of laptop users!

ppp said...

Well good on them for their ambition: cafe/cake shop, gallery, bar, hopefully they'll get the balance right.

Anonymous said...

Getting things done and being ruthless are not mutually inclusive. Of course we in Brockley look to achieve things that benifit the many and are not as selfish as those in other wards as you have suggested before.

anon @11.02 said...

@Tamsin - all I want is a similar level of freshness to what I can find in Costcutter, Broca supermarket, the Co-op and Budgens. All of which are vastly superior to the inappropriately named Brockley Superfoods.

Anonymous said...

Nick! you've gone American.
I believe they are seeking a licenCe....

I've been in recently a few times and am MUCH more impressed than on previous trips. NIce waiters, good attitude, decenet food, large space etc.

Anonymous said...

Tamsin, that must have been very tough indeed, both for your father at the time and your family afterwards.

One of my relatives was also a POW and on a forced march of many hundreds of miles to Germany from where he was captured in France, he dropped by the wayside through exhaustion and was about to be left in the snow to die when another starving and shattered prisoner gave him his saved up bread for the day. That act of human kindness, he says, gave him the impetus to go on and he survived the war.

Bearing in mind that no one really knew when their next piece of bread was coming, it was an incredibly generous and self sacrificing thing to have done.

My relative looked up the chap when he got back and found him in straitened circumstances, like a lot of former servciemen. He ended up as he put it, privileged to pay for the chap's child's education. He always said that if the other man had accepted it, he would have done much more.

Positive story out of horrible times, no?

Monkeyboy said...

My mum had to hide a pig from the Germans in Italy, they do like pork do Nazis - it's a well known fact. My day used to sell them American cigarettes from misplaced airdrops to the Allies. I can't even comprehend what life must have been like as a peasent farmer. It did refelct at home, my mum would only throw stuff out of the fridge when it could get up and walk and my dad used to insist that we ate as much as we liked. I assume because it made him happy that we could.

I wonder if she found the pig once the Germans passed through?

Tamsin said...

Indeed positive - and how wonderful that he was able to trace his benefactor and that they both survived.

Life changing, indeed, for my father (presumed dead, the girl he was half engaged to married elsewhere and his mother, moving house, disposing of a lot of the family memorabilia) but he kept it very much to himself. The only mental legacies we were aware of growing up was this thing about not throwing away food unless it could practically walk to the dustbin itself and a life-long admiration for the Aussies.

Anonymous said...

Intrigued by the "Provision for dancing". What can we hope to see?

Anonymous said...

Monkeyboy,
You might like a film the name of which I forget but it is absically about the village pig that is being hidden from the UK's |Food Ministry and I think is being kept for CHristmas or a celebration. Quite funny.

M said...

That would be A Private Function.

Drew Ringdda Waugh said...

More of these reminiscences please! Jolly entertaining for a Sunday evening just before the BAFTAs.

Tamsin said...

And the Secret of Santa Vittoria - hiding the greater part of a wine harvest from the Germans.

Would watch the BAFTAs but Jonathon Ross is so irritating. So Poirot instead...

Anonymous said...

thank you M. it is indeedy.

Klaus said...

@Tamisin-my grandfather died in a concentration camp during the war-he fell out of a watchtower!

Anonymous said...

I love this site,starts off with a coffee shop applying for a licence,and ends with the second world war.

Anonymous said...

Reminds me of the theory about on-line discussions/arguments: the longer they continue, the greater the chances of the Nazis being mentioned - eventually approaching 100%.

A rather more sedate progression in this instance, though!

Bea said...

My captured German grandfather (Wehrmacht not Nazi) was being lined up by the side of a barn where round the corner his comrades were being shot / executed by the Russians when a Russian guard saw him praying the rosary whilst looking at a family photo. He told my grandfather to make a run for it - which he did. He found a different barn with dead civilians, took their clothes and eventually made his way home (via a swim across the River Elbe). He was one of the first men to return to the village after the war. I expect they slaughtered the pig in celebration since as Monkeyboy states - Germans are partial to a bit of pork.

Monkeyboy said...

He wasn't near an Italian village called Arpino was he? If so I'll send a bill. What do pigs go for these days?

Tamsin said...

What is really touching is the War Memorial in Magdalen College - all the alumni who died in WWII, including one lad from the Wehrmacht.

There is also a book of their stories "The Undone Years" (from the Wilfred Owen poem Strange Meeting). A collection of mini-biographies of lives cut short.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
evision said...

http://www.sangambayard-c-m.com

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