Peckham and Camberwell - The New Brockleys


Bruce Wayne - age 8: Did you build this train, Dad?
Thomas Wayne: Gotham's been good to our family, but the city's been suffering. People less fortunate than us have been enduring very hard times. So we built a new, cheap, public transportation system to unite the city.
- Batman Begins

And so it begins. The paint has barely dried on our funky new East London Line-orange station signs before the hype machine has moved on to Peckham and Camberwell, beneficiaries of line's further extension to Clapham Junction.

Artists? House prices? These changelings are stealing all our best lines.

The New York Times has proved itself a fickle friend. Having done Deptford and New Cross, it's now lauding Peckham and Camberwell as the homes of the hip:

But now as young artists flock to Peckham, attracted by large spaces and low rents, and Camberwell’s residential boom has led to a commercial one, the area is emerging as a go-to cultural destination. And the planned expansion of the East London Line, connecting Peckham and Camberwell to the London Overground system, should help attract a new wave of Londoners.

City AM has also stuck to what it does best - hyping areas of London to City boys in search of a good investment. These lines may sound familiar:

With the opening of a segment of the East London Line extension this week, Hackney, Wapping and Shoreditch just became a lot more desirable.

Yet the best property moves are made well in advance of such obvious bonuses, so if you’re looking to buy now, consider the areas of south-east and south-west London that will be connected to Surrey Quays when the rest of the line is completed in 2012. The line will begin at Clapham Junction and stop along the way at currently unconnected spots such as Peckham Rye, Denmark Hill and Queen’s Road Peckham.

33 comments:

Anonymous said...

Camperwell? Where's that?

Tressilliana said...

Three attempts, Nick - the right one is Camberwell! King's College London hyped Camberwell a few years ago to unsuspecting overseas students as 'multicultural, vibrant Camberwell'. Well, yes - but there are several other adjectives that come to mind as well -grubby, noisy, shabby, downmarket being amongst them. Give me Brockley any time.

Brockley Nick said...

i've wiped it off the face of the earth

Headhunter said...

When I read the headline I thought we were now annexing Camberwell and Peckham for Brockley, marching onwards having successfully moved on from St Johns, Crofton Park, Ladywell etc.

I love the way City AM declares that previously Peckham Rye, Denmark Hill and Queen's Rd Peckham are "currently unconnected", it's amazing that direct links to London Bridge, Blackfriars, Victoria and Charing Cross in a couple of stops and a matter of 15 mins qualifies as "unconnected"!

Anonymous said...

Peckham to be home of the Hip ? Don't make me laugh its more home of the gunslinger.

Lou Baker said...

Peckham and Camberwell actually become far
less well connected as a result of the East London Line.

They each lose 4 trains per hour which go to Central London and connect easily with half a dozen tube
lines.

Instead they get 4 trains per hour to Clapham - with no proper tube connections at all - and 4 trains to Dalston, also with connection issues.

If the ELL was done properly it'd be great for Peckham but it's being done on the cheap with questionable benefits.

Anonymous said...

Dad, the record's scratching...

Anonymous said...

bit of a shame that the sign doesn"t have the word Brockley actually inside the roundel like some of the ELL stations - presumably this is because it's not exclusively an ELL station.

Hugh said...

Is that cafe opening on Tyrwhitt or what?

Anonymous said...

is it correct that there will only be 4 trains an hour each way?

Headhunter said...

Yeah I heard there's been a fair bit of fuss about cuts to central London trains in Demark Hill and Camberwell etc, sounds like they're faring even worse than us.

Heidi said...

@ Anon 11.06 - there will be 8 ELL and 4 London Bridge trains per hour from Brockley station.

Monkeyboy said...

From the mayors transport stategy, still very much in the 'nice to have' category but good to see it's still being talked about. No money etc allocated even for a decent study but still......


"The Bakerloo line has an important role in London’s transport geography, serving the strategic northwest-southeast corridor with its important regeneration zones including Harlesden, Paddington, Elephant & Castle and inner southeast London A Bakerloo southern extension would allow the line to serve inner and outer southeast London. This would create a new southeast to northwest strategic route through the Capital, serving areas with poor transport accessibility and freeing up National Rail capacity at London Bridge for other service improvements."

Tommo said...

For once I agree with Lou. I can't see how the ELL phase 2 through Peckham and Denmark Hill brings much benefit to those areas (apart from tube map status)

A new station at Brixton to connect to the Victoria line it would be a massive improvement but it doesn't look like it will happen.

Bea said...

Used the line for the first time yesterday! Yippee - shaved 15 mins off my commute despite two changes. Can't wait for it to reach Brockley when the time saved will be even greater.

TJ said...

Told you so...

Tamsin said...

For most journalists and all politicians you are unconnected unless your station is one with a roundel.

Do I gather that the desperately, but desperately needed station at Surrey Canal Road is a casualty expenditure cuts?

Monkeyboy said...

Check the "London reconnections" website. They have a seris of letters obtained under the FOI Act. Sounds
like therenis still money due from central government, it would be very easy to "defer" that now. A real shame, that area does actually have housing nearby that could do with a boost and it will never be cheaper, the contractors are there and ready to go. Revisiting the site later can only cost more.

http://londonreconnections.blogspot.com/2010/05/surrey-canal-road-very-postal-war.html

Lou Baker said...

Surrey Canal Rd is unfunded.

Apparently they think it will cost 10 million
pounds to build, hence the reluctance.

What does all this money go on?

A couple of platforms, a few seats, a covered area if we're lucky.

How does that cost 10m?

This is an example of why government shouldn't be allowed to do anything, ever.

Monkeyboy said...

Lou, if you ever go back of house in a station you'll realise that it's a little more than that.

Lou Baker said...

@monkeyboy

Yeah but even a couple of under-educated staff sitting around watching Jeremy Kyle on a cheap TV don't push the price up to £10m.

Tamsin said...

Is it like the fears that with the DDA Village Halls and community buildings would close because they could not comply - everyone being deprived because what can be afforded would be inaccessible to some?

Does seem wicked for the surrounding community to have all the inconvenience of a railway line being driven through it with out the benefit of being able to use the thing.

Monkeyboy said...

Making brand new stations DDA compliant is not so difficult, generally, making old station compliant can cost silly money. No doubt lou could design one for fifty quid and still have time to drown a few kittens.

Lou Baker said...

@monkey

Adding a ramp still doesn't make it £10m.

Monkeyboy said...

How much will a new station cost? Is a ramp all that's required? I don't know but I suspect you REALLY don't.

Anonymous said...

@Lou

Railway infrastructure costs so much because it is all bespoke. You can't just go and buy a new station off the shelf at tescos.
Much of it is non-standard parts that have to custom-made. Not to mention the cost of land, public enquiries, red tape etc.

Headhunter said...

I know nothing about building stations and don't know what teh £10m would be spent on, but I suspect there is an element of truth to what Lou says. Whenever the public sector is involved costs always seem to spiral just as time taken and beyond deadlines extends. Jubilee Line works, Wembley Stadium, the new leisure centre near Clissold Park are 3 publically funded projects which don't appear to be going to plan or budget.

I was talking to a Japanese friend about the ELL extension the other day. It's taken what, 2½ years to re open the line? They put in a few new junctions, a bit of extra line here and there. My flatmate was saying that in Osaka they built a whole new underground line (tunnels, tracks, junctions etc etc - the Imazatosuji Line) with 11 new stations in less than the time it took to do the ELL.

Tommo said...

@Headhunter. I think you'll find the Jubilee line upgrade is being carried out by a private sector company - Tubelines, owned by Bechtel and Ferrovial (until a couple of days ago when TfL brought the operation back in house). The Jubilee line upgrade hasn't exactly been a shining example of private sector competance has it?

Another good example of this is the mess we have with private sector running the railways in the UK. The subsidy dished out to the private firms to run the railways is double that given to BR when it was in state hands. This extra money is used to line shareholders pockets.

Tamsin said...

40% of Govia (who own Southern and South Eastern) being - I am pretty sure - owned by the French government... Lovely.

I did not think I was a socialist but I wish we could re-nationalise the railways and we need to stop the stealth privatisation of the NHS and other public services.

Anonymous said...

HH, a tip. Starting your posts with "I know nothing about trains/schools/fusion physics*..." does nothing to enhance the credibility of your comments

*delete as applicable

Headhunter said...

It wasn't meant to be a foolproof, "credible" comment on railways, it was simply a comment, hence the starting phrase "I know nothing about...", I'm quite happy for you or anyone else to come back with a disagreement.

Anonymous said...

...it wasn't credible so well done.

Brockley Nick said...

@HH - Wembley Stadium's rebuild wasn't a public sector project, it was privately financed by a private company (Wembley National Stadium Limited). It was also a fixed price contract.

Latest Tweets

Brockley Central Label Cloud

Click one of the labels below to see all posts on that subject. The bigger the label, the more posts there are!