Hilly Fields Birdsong Walk tonight

The density of bumblebee nests in gardens in towns and suburbs is greater than in the countryside... Garden cities may be the best hope left for life on earth.
-
Charles Clover, The Times

The Friends of Hilly Fields are organising an evening birdsong walk in the park tonight, from 6.30pm to 8pm.

Chris McGaw from Lewisham’s People and Rivers Project will lead the guided walk. The group will meet by the Park Keeper’s Office.

30 comments:

Tamsin said...

Lovely - went to the one last month in One Tree Hill. But Hilly Fields is a big place so where, exactly, is the Park Keeper's Office?

Now Then said...

The building right at the top, Tamsin, it includes the toilets and is nearby the tennis courts, sort of. (May become a cafe but thats no help in finding it)

zzzzz said...

Speaking of bumble bees, I've had several in the house recently, and had two of them in my living room at once yesterday. One was a normal brown and yellow one and was quite placid, the other was dark reddish brown and was banging around furiously - took me quite a while to catch it.

Anonymous said...

I think its just past the Bowling Green on the left,or it used to be.

Headhunter said...

Interesting quote/article about bumble bees, I have heard that bee populations are higher in cities and towns than the countryside. They love that Green Alkanet weed, all over that stuff. Gradens seem to be really important habitats for birds and bees (and I'm not just talking about the dogging society), it would be good if Boris could live up to his promise of trying to recategorise gardens from brownfield sites ripe for development.

cheerleader said...

Save the bumblebee - save the world.

Tamsin said...

Seriously, if it were not for bees pollinating food crops North America certainly and Europe probably would be in a very bad state. And in America particularly where they have factory farming down to a fine art they truck the poor things all over the country to follow the ripening flowers. No wonder the poor things are stressed out and suffering colony collapse.

In the UK urban honey wins all the prizes.

Headhunter said...

There was a documentary a few weeks ago about sudden hive death or whatever it's called which has been sweeping across the US over the past few years and is now starting to affect hives here in the UK and Europe. No one can work out what's causing it but suddenly entire hives of bees will collapse. Some believe it's intensive pesticide use, others environmental and climate change or possibly a virus.

Commercial beekeepers are all going out of business which spells disaster for farmers such as almond famers in California who rely on commercial beekeepers to transport hives to the almond fields to pollinate the trees, without them they reckon the almond business will collapse as it's inconceivable that they hire thousands of human workers to go round with small paint brushes pollinating the trees by hand!

It's also likely to spell disaster and cost famers of any crops which require pollination billions in years to come if bees are effectively removed from the natural cycle. Bees are an absolutely fundamental part of nature.

Nux said...

The walk sounds lovely - but I hope everyone takes due precautions...
http://www.newsshopper.co.uk/4638/8208903

lb said...

Bumblebees live in small, bijou nests so are not affected by CCD, luckily. However their numbers are still declining, particularly due to changing agricultural practises. One species, the shrill carder bumblebee is almost extinct in Britain.

[zzzzz] The reddish-brown one might have been a species called the red-tailed bumblebee. Appealing little things.

Anonymous said...

Will this give rise to a new Hilly Fields activity I wonder - "birding?"

We were only listening to the birdsong, officer!

zzzzz said...

yes lb, I was interested enough to look it up on-line to see what type it was - wish I'd taken a closer look now, as I could have sworn it was mostly reddish-brown, whereas the red-tailed is mainly black. It's quite hard to get a clear picture in your mind when it's bobbing around and you're trying to capture it without damaging it.

HuntMeDown said...

Will there be fox watching next ?,there's a couple of manege ones round the Upper Brockley Road.

Brockley Dogging Society said...

The fox debate rages within the BDS. Some find the passionate shreaks of the foxes union enhance the evening, indeed there is a campaign to make the fox the official logo. Others find that they sit and watch, their beady unblinking eyes can put one off their stroke.

Anonymous said...

Oh BDS you shouldn't be stroking foxes you know...

Mb said...

I'm stopping in, nature is a bad thing. http://twitpic.com/1v8khp

Anonymous said...

Has anyone had a fox come into their house? I don't mind the shrieking so much but it's a bit freaky if they start moving in as they seem to be in other parts of London.

drakefell debaser said...

News Shopper are very good at chucking out tat aren't they.

Still, it gives me an excuse to wear my pith helmet this weekend.

Headhunter said...

I don't think foxes are suddenly starting to come into houses! One report of a fox entering a house in East London and attacking kids as they sleep, although alarming, is not a sudden change of attitude in all foxes. Most foxes I see round Brockers still run away as I approach.

Brockley Nick said...

"One report of a fox entering a house in East London and attacking kids as they sleep, although alarming, is not a sudden change of attitude in all foxes."

But one delay on the East London Line is proof of a deterioration of reliability of train services to Brockley ;)

Anonymous said...

The only logical conclusion is that foxes are eating train drivers. Come on News Shopper - theres a scoop for you.

zzzzz said...

I used to live in an apartment block with a porter on reception 24 hours a day, and they used to get young foxes coming into the building during the night, right up to the reception desk (along a 40 foot corridor) where they would just look at the porter and then slink away. That was 10 years ago in Tower Hill.

I suspect it was a young fox that attacked those babies - older ones tend to be more wary.

Mb said...

It's a change in behaviour caused the cultural shift in the garbage we throw out. One scrap of jerk chicken and they behave like animals!

(as our resident Nick Griffen lite may assert)

Brockley Nick said...

When I was a kid growing up in SE London (managed to do that without being sucked in to gang culture and without wishing I was playing with the Secret Seven in the west country) a fox wandered in to our house, got stuck and made itself at home in our chest of drawers.

So they have been doing it for at least 25 years. Although they didn't savage me.

Matt-Z said...

One evening six or seven years ago a friend and I saw a fox on Darfield Road struggling to carry whole roast chicken which it had evidently just snaffled. Another friend came down the road half an hour later and the fox was still hanging around with its dinner looking both guilty and smug.

The Real BDS said...

I've seen some things that would make a fox blink.

The Brockley Dogging Society said...

To the 'real' BDS. You and your followers know full whell why you were expelled. Colin is still very anoyed, we may be old fasioned but queuing is the only thing turning an evenings dogging into an unseamly tangle of limbs. Not everyone is as young as you, consideration costs nothing you know. I bet your the kind of guy who grabs all the crispy duck at a chineese banquet, leaving the tofu for those less assertive.

The Provisional BDS said...

We will play no part in this.


Unless offered uniforms.

Headhunter said...

No, Nick. It was delays on the Southern trains caused by the ELL. Geddit right! And it was more than once... About 3 times at the very least!

Tamsin said...

Doing some proof-reading once in the wee small hours with the french windows into the garden open and a stunningly handsome adult fox walked in, took a disdaintful look at his surroundings and stalked out again.

I felt like that little toy in the lovely children's book "Nothing" - totally humiliated at being sniffed at and found wanting by a fox.

(Back on topic - nice bird walk, explored bits of Hilly Fields I did not know existed, and heard and saw a variety of birds. Many thanks to LBL for setting the scheme up and Brockley Nick for drawing the event to my attention.)

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