June strike planned for DLR

The RMT union has announced a strike from June 23 (England v Slovenia)-June 26. The union's members will also refuse to work any overtime on Monday, June 28.

The RMT wants more money for its members following the introduction of three-car trains on the DLR. The operator Serco Docklands says there has been no change to workers' jobs, terms or conditions.

45 comments:

Lou Baker said...

Bob Crow. Yawn. What an insuferable bore.

The DLR is the most efficient railway in London because it's run by a computer and not by his members.

Fire the lot of them.

Mb said...

the fact that railway was designed an integrated system from scratch and not a mix and match of different equipment built in different decades to differing standards has a lot to do with it.

... But yes, that and less restrictive working practices makes a difference.

david said...

how exactly have 3 cars on teh DLR trains increased the work that the attendants actually have to do (what do they do on the DLR anyways?)?

STO said...

There are more tickets to check?

Paddyom said...

How does ane extra carriage affect their ability to drive the train or push whatever buttons are needed to make it go? Chancers.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, and 9 out of 10 times I go on the DLR the don't even check my ticket. Maybe they're too busy doing whatever else they do (errrrrm...)

Anonymous said...

Workers attacking workers.

Anonymous said...

Why don't they just install tube-style "1 at a time" barriers like they use everywhere else?

Anonymous said...

maybe the extra carriage means more people embark and disembark, therefore longer waits at each station and therefore longer time between their breaks. Therefore they want more money???????

the whole thing sounds like c**p to me but they gotta strike for some reason it's just what they do. They always want more money ........actually so do I but I can't strike for it, drat!

Anonymous said...

Everyone can strike so long as they follow the correct process. Unless your the bill or a fighter pilot?

anon 1944 said...

Given the way this country is I'm surprised there aren't more strikes. There's so much inequality and downright unfairness. The few people that put their heads above the parapet and follow their convictions by withdrawing their labour are lambasted by their fellow workers.

I don't know the rights and wrongs of this case but as somone who has to work for a living I know that more often than not, it is management that needs to look at its actions rather than the workers

Anonymous said...

"the management" "the workers" I've not seen a satisfactory definition of those two groupings.

Brockley Nick said...

Quite, the polarised "us and them" attitude towards labour relations is disastrous and too many in the union movement perpetuate it.

Anonymous said...

anon 1944 - almost all of us have to work for a living - not sure what point you're making with that

In my opinion strikes are outdated. Nobody's working conditions in this country are that bad that they need to strike. For example the recent BA strikes - their cabin crew get a far better deal than others in the industry and their strikes are just making the company lose more and more money which ultimately may mean they lose their jobs - how can that be sensible?

The way I see it is that a few union leaders egg people on and bully them into striking and using divisive language like "workers" and "management" "us" and "them" rather than looking at it rationally and comparing their working conditions with those of others in the industry.

Mezzer said...

You might be right in a lot of cases anon, but BA is a bad example. The management stance is incredibly stubborn and bullying - which is largely what the stike is about.

Thomas said...

Oh good, I will be able to see the England game as Im on strike.

Anonymous said...

The BA strike was ill-conceived but Willy Walsh comes across as vindictive and obstructive, especially when digging in his heels about travel perks (used by some staff to get to work) when the unions were prepared to do a deal - it just made him look small and mean.

The reasons for the DLR strike don't look entirely convincing, I have to say.

Anonymous said...

Is the DLR strike on the same days as the Tube Lines strike?

"Members will not book on for any shift commencing between 19.00 hours on Wednesday 23rd June 2010 and 18.59 on Friday 25th June 2010 and between 19.00 hours on Wednesday 14th July and 18.59 hours on Friday 16th July."

Anonymous said...

Interesting....

DLR vote: "In the ballot, which concluded last week, members voted by almost nine to one for action."

Tube Lines Vote: ... following a nine to one vote for action...

Will the Tube Line strike effect the Overground Tube?

Brockley Nick said...

The DLR strike conveniently coincides with the Tube strike, despite supposedly being about a completely unrelated issue.

The ELL is unaffected, I think.

Headhunter said...

My bike never goes on strike. I have to fix a puncture now and then and give her a bit of loving care with a bit of degreaser/chain and mech lubricant. Other than that she serves me well through rain, snow, sun and hail...

Anonymous said...

My definition is management: those that make decisions, workers: those that have to effect those decisions.

Brockley Nick said...

Well that's not a very helpful definition. Nearly every job involves both making decisions and carrying out decisions (both your own and other people's).

Well-run companies empower people at every level to make decisions. Good "managers" also take time to do themselves what they are asking others to do.

Anonywus said...

Manager: I’m going to cut your salary, change your working hours and amend your pension. In fact, you know that contract you signed? Let’s just tear it up shall we?

Worker: OK boss.

Anonymous said...

Good "managers" also take time to do themselves what they are asking others to do.

That just brightened up my day - hahahaaaaaa

Anonymous said...

empower is a lovely buzzword, used to so often, what does it actually mean?

Brockley Nick said...

Give people license to make their own decisions. Give them responsibility. Give them autonomy.

Brockley Nick said...

Anon 15:16 - you obviously work in the 1970s. Sorry to hear that.

Lou Baker said...

Here's an idea.

If you don't like your boss, or your salary, or your working conditions then GET A NEW JOB.

Easy.

Anonymous said...

The thing is, if someone who is more powerful 'empowers' someone less powerful, the relationship is still didactic and controlling. This is the fallacy that a lot of people buy into or promote.

Anonymous said...

Where do Union 'bosses' fit in to all this?

Brockley Nick said...

"The thing is, if someone who is more powerful 'empowers' someone less powerful, the relationship is still didactic and controlling. This is the fallacy that a lot of people buy into or promote."

Yes, yes, we are all working for the man, unless we choose to work for ourselves.

But that is irrelevant to the question being debated, which is whether there is a clear distinction between managers (decision makers) and workers (doers).

Most people's jobs involve some level of management, some degree of autonomy and some degree of "doing".

Sometimes I make decisions which I expect other people to implement, sometimes I make decisions I expect myself to implement and sometimes people make decisions they expect me to implement. Even within the implementation of those decisions there are many lower-level decisions to be made.

It's not binary, it's a continuum and our place on that continuum is never fixed.

Many CEOs of publicly listed companies would candidly concede that they are often working for the benefit of the markets and have less of a decision-making role than they did before they became CEO...

Anonymous said...

I agree it's a continuum, Nick, but there will still be a lot of variation between organisations. Formerly nationalised businesses like BA and the train companies don't seem to be able to shake off the legacy of their former existences, and part of that legacy is a hierarchical culture, in which a more controlling style of management persists. The 'us' and 'them' culture and 1970s-style industrial relations are symptomatic of that.

Brockley Nick said...

Agreed, but the Unions are at least as guilty as the senior management of maintaining that unhealthy status quo.

Monkeyboy said...

I've only been in LU for a few years but the RMT seems to want to perpetuate the "workers" distinction despite many of their members being in a mangement position. In fact Bob Crows iron grip on the union could give some cause to wonder about how they organise themselves. In fact I'm in a union (a wooley White collar one!) nothing wrong with union that sees itself as representing it's members but recognises that the health of the company is as much their responsibility as the "management". The RMT, as it's currently organised needs the stark distinction, it will end up destroying itself.

Lou Baker said...

@nick

The unions are even more guilty of that.

Some unions - certainly not all - do a good job of overseeing health and safety.

Beyond that most are a waste of space.

I left the NUJ having realised it's basically a bunch of pseudo-commies with the collective belief that things were better in 1975.

Monkeyboy said...

Lou, for some workers, those REALLY at the bottom of the pile, unions can work. After union pressure TfL insisted that it's contractor up the wage of the cleaners who do a s**t job for little money. The trouble is the grandstanding the RMT engage in makes them look like a protection racket.

Anonymous said...

The RMT website is extremely old skool, they won't be 'bullied' every management is a 'bully'.

Bob Crow beliefs private companies should not exist and things should be run and owned by the state.

So he isn't concerned about the financial consequences for a company, as he would like them to be nationalised.

Why don't the unions put together a deal and take over the running of DLR and show the private companies how it should be managed?

anon 1944 said...

Anonymous said...

The thing is, if someone who is more powerful 'empowers' someone less powerful, the relationship is still didactic and controlling. This is the fallacy that a lot of people buy into or promote.

Good point, they did this at my place. I was 'empowered' to take on more work at the same pay and have to and be the front for management decisons that they weren't prepared to present directly.

Anonymous said...

TUC declares Lewisham an unemployment blackspot....

In the borough the number of dole claimants outnumbers job vacancies by 13.9 to one compared to the national average of five to one.

This figure makes Lewisham the third worst place in the country for unemployment after Hackney and Haringey.

The TUC compiled its report after analysing the figures of Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) claimants and vacancies advertised in Jobcentre Plus.


Isn't this assumption flawed as the vast majority of residents work outside of the borough?

Brockley Nick said...

Yes.

Anonymous said...

Link to news story for the above.....

http://www.newsshopper.co.uk/news/lewgreen/8218847.ECONOMY__Report_names_Lewisham_as_jobless_blackspot/

Anonymous said...

Lies, dammed lies, etc. but it does highlight a couple of regrettable facts - that unemployment is high in Inner London and there are not many local jobs. The over-powering Labour majority in the Council should be requested to consider the Conservative and Lib.Dem (and Green) proposals and policies on support for local business if they want to carry their badge "Labour" without shame.

hea said...

Personally I can certainly see the case for having unions to protect workers' rights but as Nick points out, they are often aligned along outdated them and us, Socialist vs capitalist ideals and essentially have a lot invested in this view of teh workplace.

I remember being slightly amused a while back when major unions were condemning business leaders and owners for awarding themselves inflation busting bonuses and salary increases when a paper, can't remember which, did a kind of expose on senior salary levels in the unions themselves. People like Bob Crow are earning healthy 6 figure salaries with decent bonuses! Hardly the image of the downtrodden worker.

Headhunter said...

That was me...

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