Brockley in the 1920s


Friend of BC Bea has sent us this map of 1920s Brockley. She says:


I find it interesting to see how some of the road names have changed i.e. Manor Road / St Peter's instead of Geoffrey Road and Albert, Clifton and Carlton Roads instead of Darling, Avon and Drake Roads (off Tressillian Road). I wonder why they changed?

Also, how little has been developed on the "other side of the tracks". It must have been great to have access to such large playing fields!

It is also possible to see the location of the band stand on Hilly Fields as well as the cricket grounds, but no bowling club, playground or (obviously) stone circle.

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

I see in the Daily Mirror you can save tokens and get a map dating 1805-1874 of your area.

TJ(O) said...

Some of the white space near the railway tracks were railway yards - there were two near Brockley Station that increased its attractiveness as a target in the Blitz

Tamsin said...

Stocks are running low but the Telegraph Hill Society has various ordnance survey maps of the area for sale from the 1870s to just before WW1.

It is very interesting seeing how the Haberdashers Estate was gradually built up once the railways were there to provide the basic transport infrastructure.

Train Spotter said...

Hmmm a train direct from Brockley to Blackheath Hill station..never noticed signs of that line at the Greenwich end

darryl said...

The old Greenwich Park rail line terminated where the Hotel Ibis/Picturehouse is. There's still a bit of the tunnel buried beneath Blackheath Hill, and a chunk of the viaduct's still standing on Brookmill Road (the nature reserve).

Thomas said...

Was that where the train crash was ?

Anonymous said...

Actually, having seen this post, I had a quick look this evening and you can see the original road names if you know what you're looking for...

Jonathan said...

My understanding was that the road names changed to reduce the number of roads in London having the same name.

david. s said...

I've only just realised looking at that map how much sense it would make for the Brockley high level station to open again, with trains to Lewisham, Blackheath, Victoria etc. Is this definitely never going to happen? I guess not in 'austerity britain'?

Tamsin said...

Until relatively recently visibly station style buildings were apparent at Blackheath Hill.

The Ravensbourne is strangely dock-like just south of Deptford Bridge Street.

Tamsin said...

The train crash was where the line from Lewisham Station climbs up quite an incline to go off left towards Nunhead, Blackfriars etc. with the main lines going straight on to St John's, New Cross and London Bride. You can (could?) still see traces of it in that the bridge girders were clearly put up in a hurry in that they are not cut off in a smooth curve, one with another, but all end higgledy-piggledy.

One of the earliest cases establishing liability for post-traumatic stress - before it had that name.

Tamsin said...

The train crash was where the line from Lewisham Station climbs up quite an incline to go off left towards Nunhead, Blackfriars etc. with the main lines going straight on to St John's, New Cross and London Bride. You can (could?) still see traces of it in that the bridge girders were clearly put up in a hurry in that they are not cut off in a smooth curve, one with another, but all end higgledy-piggledy.

One of the earliest cases establishing liability for post-traumatic stress - before it had that name.

BrockleyBiker said...

"My understanding was that the road names changed to reduce the number of roads in London having the same name."

Yep. The was a lot of rationalisation with the introduction of the Postcode system in the 60's.

Anonymous said...

The Tyrwhitt-Drake family were landowners here before moving to Maidstone where they lived in Dicken's Dingly Dell. There's a Tyrwhiit Drake museum in Maidstone, and their grounds are now a country park Lord Tyrwhitt Darke built his own private zoo at Dingly Dell.

Headhunter said...

At work I was recently sifting through our database of City workers and I came across a guy with the surname Tyrwhitt-Drake, I assume he was from the very same Brockley family.

The high level/Brockley Lane station line also stopped at the station on Lewisham Way (I think it was called Lewisham Road) round the corner from St Johns station is wher the junk shop is now based. WOuld have been lovely to have direct trains to Victoria from there AND Brockley.

What's this about a train crash? Is there a link for information on that?

Anonymous said...

The crash would be called a disaster nowadays. It even has it's own wikipedia page. Occured in heavy fog in the 1950s. Believe it's known as the lewisham crash, but the last carriage was still in st johns station

Anonymous said...

93 dead, over 173 injured. It is on wiki uder lewishsm. TJ - wrote above comment too

Tamsin said...

And - the dim recollection from long ago law exams - there was an ordinary member of the public who because he was, as described in the Law Reports, "little and brave", helped the rescue teams for hours wriggling in to tight spaces to extract the dead and injured. He was understandably so traumatised by the experience that his health suffered and a landmark case was brought on his behalf for mental suffering.

Transpontine said...

Some information about the Lewisham and Hither Green crashes, including newsreel footage, here

max said...

One of the Hither Green train crash survivors was the yet unknown Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/jul/31/robin-gibb-interview

Mb said...

I understand that police were hopping to question Brotherhood Of Man about the events leading up to the crash if you know what I'm saying

Bea said...

I heard a very moving radio interview with one of the survivors. She jumped onto the train at the last minute (time of slam doors). As it was packed (rush hour) she and her friend could only get onto the last carriage and not move down to find more space resulting in their survival. However, her neighbours' only son was killed.

Apparently, people whose homes were along the train embankment came out to help and rescue workers provided tea with lots of sugar! I guess the wartime mentality of doing your bit still prevailed. As it was so foggy it was tough to see what was happening (which was also partly the reason for the crash anyway).

StuartX said...

Fascinating, both sides of Coulgate Street seem to be developed all the way round, but don't let Network Rail know that, so much better with Common!

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