Endwell Road restaurant could be lost

An application has been lodged to convert 93 Endwell Road to residential use.

The change of use of the ground floor and rear part of the first floor of 93 Endwell Road SE4 from retail (Class 1) to residential use, to provide 1 one bedroom self contained flat and 1 two bedroom self contained maisonette, together with the raising of the roof of the existing first floor extension at the rear, plus alterations to the side and rear elevations and the construction of a front boundary wall and gate.

The freehold has been on the market for a while, describing it as a restaurant, highlighting the fact that it has gained consent for A3 restaurant use. We know of one aspiring restaurateur who'd been hoping to secure it on a leasehold basis.

If this application is approved it would suggest an incoherent approach to the development of Brockley Cross. On the one hand, new developments are forced to provide retail space at ground floor level, on the other hand, existing retail space would be being lost.

There are no further details at this stage.

18 comments:

Alex said...

I'm the owner. So who is the "aspiring restaurateur"? Please ask them to make an offer.

This property has been on the market for nearly one year now. I have had no offers.

So I've decided to convert to flats, as that is the only chance of putting this property to use.

Brockley Nick said...

Alex, thanks for your message. They'd be interested in a leasehold, but it is being marketed for sale, which is a big ask for an independent business. If you're interested in a leasehold arrangement, I can suggest they get in touch.

Anonymous said...

As many will know, that shop is not and has never been a restaurant. The only reason it has restaurant use is that a third party put in a change of use proposal but never offered on the property. For some reason the Council saw no reason to refuse it even though no one wanted it and it was not supported by the owner or residents.

As regards consistency, whilst it is always a shame to loose traditional retail properties, it would not be the first conversion to residential use in that row.

My largest concern, however, would be that in the current economic climate, a restaurant would fail and the property would simply be turned into another fast food joint like the particularly unpleasant Morelys next door. The smell from that place is disgusting if you live nearby.

Sorry to post anonymous - I haven't set up an account - but I live in that row.

David

Anonymous said...

Are it's prospects really no better as a commercial space than a residential space based on the reasons above? ie. who would want to live next door to a fried chicken shop?

Ed said...

David - you don't need an account.

I got the planningbot email for this; I thought they had stopped due to Royal Mail charging for use of their database...

I am against reclassification; this is a retail asset and if the commercial reality is that you need to take a less profitable leasehold position for a while (there have been a number of commercial interests seeking to locate locally who have been priced out) then so be it.

To say that converting to flats is the only way of putting this property to use is just not true.

If local landlords were more inclined to invest they might enjoy longer term success which brings value to the local community at the same time.

Manfred said...

Agree with Ed. Or you could drop the asking price like I had to do with my house to make a sale.

Matt-Z said...

There's the further problem of local landlords asking unrealistic rents in a time when busineses are struggling / folding, and being prepared to keep vacant retail units empty for long periods rather than reduce the rent a bit to take on a tenant.

Westsider said...

@Alex it would be good to hear if you'll consider doing these things (leasing it, lowering the sale price).

Brockley Kiwi said...

I live on Endweell Rd and would love nothing more than a tasty local at the end of my street.

Having said that I don't think you can expect Alex to be willing to adjust his strategy for the benefit of the community. If its got that much potential then why isn't someone willing to take on the freehold and then offer a lease to potential restauranteurs?

Westsider said...

@Brockley Kiwi - no, we are not asking Alex to change his strategy, he is asking the Council to change theirs.

When someone owns a commercial property it's their right to make money out of that property within the terms of the planning permission. He doesn't have the right to turn it in to flats just because it's hard to make money out of a commercial property there.

He wants a change of use. What some of us are saying is that if his current approach isn't making money, then he ought to think differently, lowering his asking price or renting it out.

If I can't sell my house, I don't ask the Council to let me turn it in to a shop or a bookies. I lower my asking price or rent it out.

No offence to Alex, I'm sure it's not easy.

Brockley Kiwi said...

Alex doesn't have the right to unilaterally turn his commercial property into a residential one but he certainly has the right to apply to the council to change the terms of the usage. The issue then sits with the council.

As much as I'd love a quality restaurant in that location I really don't thinik its fair to give him grief for trying different strategies of maximising the value of his asset.

westsider said...

No one's giving anyone grief. My position is that I don't support the change of use. The Council and the community are trying to regenerate Brockley Cross and this won't happen if we allow good quality commercial space to disappear.

Ed said...

Agreed. Nothing personal. Let's see what the council do...

Headhunter said...

It does seem a bit strange that we want to turn all this commercial space into flats yet earlier in the year someone was looking to convert a house (on Manor Ave) into a commercial establishment (a nursery)...

Bea said...

HH the club on Manor Avenue was a commercial property (but not making any money!), looking to be used as a commercial property again (the nursery) but is now being sold as either a whole house or potentially flats.

You’ve got it the wrong way round!

Headhunter said...

True...

Anonymous said...

Alex, as the aspiring restauranteur (sorry to remain anon), the freehold price plus the cost of installing a commercial kitchen, inc. a costly extraction unit, were off-putting considering that the location and building were both good, but not ideal.

No fault of yours, it's just a big leap all things considered. At the same time, I still think Brockley is missing a dedicated restaurant (not bar, not cafe) and if located well enough and pitched at the right price, etc. one could do brilliantly.

If the building were available on a lease with the cost of kitchen installation shared between landlord and tenant that building could become a lot more attractive.

It would be a shame to see one of the few commercial spaces in Brockley converted to residential, but I know you have had it on the market a while now and you need to do what is necessary.

Alex said...

I have reduced the price from £220,000 to £165,00 over the last year. I've paid for advertising. No offers at all. It's a very fair price as it's largish space and has a large 1st floor room at the rear plus a large garage.

I've got no cash to invest in a restaurant, so that won't work. I do need to sell this property for personal reasons, so I can't lease it.

> "aspiring restaurateur" what monthly rent were you thinking?

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