JP Morgan confirms Canary Wharf move

Songbird Estates and JP Morgan today confirmed that the bank will move in to the former headquarters of Lehman Brothers at 25 Bank Street in Canary Wharf, bringing the bank’s operations east, but leaving the future of the Riverside South offices unclear.

Reuters reports:

The Canary Wharf Group -- which is majority owned by Songbird Estates -- said construction work would recommence immediately to bring the development to the street level and that it had extended its development agreement with JPM until October 2016.

Riverside South is an enormous development planned to be the next stage of Canary Wharf’s growth. Comprised of two towers and huge trading floors, overlooking the Thames, it is designed to be the new European home for JP Morgan and should bring a number of other developments in its wake, ultimately doubling the size of the Wharf. Canary Wharf, like London Bridge, is one of the employment hubs driving Brockley’s long-term development.

Currently under construction, the building will almost certainly not be built on a speculative basis, so needs an anchor tenant. Whether JP Morgan views the Lehman move as an interim measure or a long-term alternative remains unclear and, despite some bowing and scraping by government to JPM leaders, the bank is hedging its bets. In either case, a major bank is relocating to Canary Wharf.

And as an early Christmas treat for the Anonymous bubble boys:
Bubble Boy: "What are you looking at? Haven't seen a kid in a bubble before?"
George: Of course I have, come on! My cousin's in a bubble. My friend Geoffrey's sister also..."

76 comments:

Anonymous said...

And that affects me how?

Brockley Nick said...

Read the article

Anonymous said...

and this fantasy world you mentioned Nick, have you sought professional advice to manage it?

Brockley Nick said...

Could you be more specific?

Anonymous said...

"you have to live within my fantasy world, which is much nicer than the real one anyway"

Canary Wharf seems to be part of that world

Anonymous said...

So, Brockley is going to fill up with bankers? And they'll demand Waitrose and Pizza Express and Starbucks. Great.

Brockley Nick said...

"Canary Wharf seems to be part of that world"

Brockley doesn't exist in a vacuum. People who live here also often work somewhere else. Lots of people who live in Brockley work in Canary Wharf, because of the good connections (which are even better now we have the ELL). Therefore, major changes to Canary Wharf will have a long-term impact on the area. It's a thesis I've expanded on time and again, so feel free to disagree, but you'll have to provide a reasoned argument...

Other anon, do all people who work in financial services like Pizza Express?

Anonymous said...

Of course, whether you get an adequate 'pizza' is a gamble. They love that.

Danja said...

I doubt the logic - IME bankers prefer to have the odds firmly skewed in their favour.

Tim said...

Anonymous - what is wrong with having a waitrose, pizza express and Starbucks? You wouldn't have to use them, and it's not as if Brockley is brimming with fantastic independently owned businesses (I can think of one). And what is wrong with bankers?

Tamsin said...

Everything. At least five. Nearly everything.

Anonymous said...

nick i was here when they built canary wharf and all the talk then was how it was gonna change our area, then when the dlr arrived it was gonna radically change our worlds with all the city bankers moving into the area. the fact is that city bankers buy big houses in little villages in the country ie kent and surrey (well less surrey) so dont get too excited. brockley isnt THAT desirable to your fantasy new neighbours. Thank God!

Anonymous said...

Bankers... (ah do your own rhyming slang)

Anonymous said...

gets you quite grumpy, this kind of thing, doesn't it Nick?

Mb said...

So let's be absolutely clear. The dlr has had no benefits to the area? Where are all the people who get in at lewisham, depford and Greenwich going? If you want to see a vision of an urban area with poor transport links see thamesmead and I think you'll find that for every banker (not all of which are scheming thieves) there are a legion of PAs, security guards, receptionists, it workers, maintenance staff, taxi drivers etc, etc.... Mixed communities are better than ghettos, public transport helps that. So NUR!

Anonymous said...

@ Mb BANK

Anonymous said...

@ Mb BANK

Anonymous said...

@mb and no one was arguing that there were NO benefits just not the exaggerated ones you are spouting. so back to local news

Richard Elliot said...

I thought the plan was for JPM to move vitally all of their businesses to Canary Wharf, acquiring the Lehmans building only moves the Investment Bank leaving lots of people still in the city. Perhaps I'm wrong or maybe there has been a change in strategy.

P.S. JPM staff do love Pizza Express. There are several branches located next to their offices that are always packed. I used to work at JPM, it was in our contract we had to go once a week.

Mel said...

My husband works for an investment bank and so do at least three other people on my street, and another one used to. Only a small fraction of the people who work for banks get million pound bonuses, and Brockley offers good value to those who don't fall into that category, but are nevertheless well paid, and who want a nice house that is reasonably central but don't feel the need to live within yards of a Pizza Express.

Anonymous said...

@mel we have established the pizza need/no need does he work in canary wharf?

Tim said...

Anonymous - I'm not sure Mel's husband's workplace is relevant, is it? I think she was making the general point that normal people in the Financial Services industry see Brockley as attractive, probably for many of the same reasons as you.
Anonymous - Perhaps you could tell us what is so awful about Pizza Express? I would also be interested to hear what your favoured dining establishments are?

PS. Why are you anonymous?
PPS. Can you actually come up with a reasoned argument about why "bankers" are so ghastly?

Mb said...

Sigh.... The dlr and ell links us to the rest of London. I like London, I choose to live in SE4. Can you see..?

Anonymous said...

@mel my comment wasnt meant as an attack apols...
@tim but to make the point that relates back to the implication of the original article ie that a move by JP Morgan to canary wharf will impact on Brockley and i am merely pointing out that as lovely as that wish may be, history has shown that it isnt necssarily the case(see my comment 18.25) Brockley has always had people working in the city (my brother and his wife both work for The Old Lady of Threadneedle and my sister works in investment banking although all of them are brockley born residents so didnt move here as a result of the jobs

i dont care about pizza express I was only responding to mels comment. challenge other anons re that

I am anon because i am tired of being attacked for having another view to the regular comments on here which i believe are aspirational but unrealistic and exaggerated at times(not in this case @tim)

will be spending xmas with bankers - no probs at all. challenge other anons re that too

Brockley Nick said...

"gets you quite grumpy, this kind of thing, doesn't it Nick?"

Escalating degrees of fury:

Level 1: Willful ignorance
"I refuse to find out about this thing no matter how much it affects me"

Level 2: Willful ignorance + strong opinions based on ignorance
"But I still think that person who has bothered to find out, or might do it for a living, is an idiot"

Level 3: Willful ignorance + strong opinions + refusal to 2acknowledge facts to the contrary
"And nothing you can say will convince me otherwise"

Level 4: Willful ignorance + strong opinions + belligerence + rudeness
"And anyway, stop writing about the thing I don't know anything about and do what I want"

Mb said...

Look out the window guys.... Anyone else as bored of the snow as me?

Brockley Nick said...

@anon - if your goodwill with your other name has been used up then please think up a new one - it makes conversations easier.

On the point about Brockley having had bankers living in it before Canary Wharf - sure, I think we all understand that. The point isn't that anything will be magically transformed overnight, it's simply that the kind of work done by the people living here will naturally change over time in accordance with the type of work available nearby. That will have some impact. That is all.

Anonymous said...

@nick On the point about Brockley having had bankers living in it before Canary Wharf No no no wasnt making THAT point. All too young for that to be the case. Please revisit post 18.25

"it's simply that the kind of work done by the people living here will naturally change over time in accordance with the type of work available nearby"

Not sure why thats so important to you but That hasnt proved to be the case either and JP morgan moving from City to Canary Wharf will have little impact around here.

Brockley Nick said...

@anon -

"That hasnt proved to be the case either"

What is your evidence for that assertion?

"and JP morgan moving from City to Canary Wharf will have little impact around here."

Having "little" impact is another way of saying it will have "some" impact - hence the story.

Mb said...

Not many folk round here work at the deptford Victuallers yard, brockleys brick works or Market gardens anymore. That's because employment patterns change according to work available so the fact that docklands and LB are expanding and the fact that our links to those areas are getting better suggest that they will have an effect. It's not a complex idea. Do you not think the plebs around here will ever want to work in the financial sector or they are not capable?

Brockley Dogging Society said...

Isn't it about time there were some new erections in Canary Wharf?

Anonymous said...

@mb your use of the word "plebs" makes u an undesirable in Brockley and thats the final response you will get from me.
@ nick "What is your evidence for that assertion?"

good question and one i should have asked you in the first place - may be this exchange would have been shorter. My evidence is anecdotal and observational and it is based on the 30 yrs since Canary Wharf was built and the little impact it has had on this area compared to the impact it has had on say EAST london which is unrecognisable to how it was then. The changes in occupation around here has more to do the economic policies in place during the Thatcher era that switched from manufacturing to service industries and the rise of the banking industries. But my point remains that a move of those same banks from the from the city to canary wharf isnt going to really change anything here. but perhaps if you say it often enough it will. Hope it moves faster over the next 30 yrs

Mb said...

I used in the sense that I DO think that people in born in lewisham can and do want to work in the financial sector. You seem to think they are incapable or don't want to, you're wrong. What jobs do you think we should restrict them too?

Brockley Nick said...

@Anon - "My evidence is anecdotal and observational and it is based on the 30 yrs since Canary Wharf was built"

Not sure how reliable your observation is then as One Canada Square was only completed in 1991. Canary Wharf only really became a success by the end of the 1990s. So it's only really on the basis of the last 10 years that we can judge its impact.


"and the little impact it has had on this area compared to the impact it has had on say EAST london which is unrecognisable to how it was then."

This is true of some of East London, by no means all of it. But yes, I wouldn't argue with the claim that the effect on East London is more profound, but, if anything, that reinforces the point. The areas with a "competitive advantage" in terms of reaching Canary Wharf will be disproportionately affected. That is true of East London as it is of Greenwich and as it is of Brockley, especially now the ELL is connected - a new development.

"The changes in occupation around here has more to do the economic policies in place during the Thatcher era that switched from manufacturing to service industries and the rise of the banking industries."

And where do you think those jobs were created? If Canary Wharf was on the other side of London, do you think the change around here (which you now seem to be acknowledging has happened) would be as big?

Mb said...

By the way, a pleb is a normal jo. I'm a pleb, I suspect your a pleb... Or are you a rich landed gentry?

Anonymous said...

@nick but the JP morgan move from the CITY to CANARY WHARF isnt creating new jobs just moving and probably reducing the jobs that are already there. Therefore nothing really changes - least of all in Brockley

Brockley Nick said...

@Anon -

"but the JP morgan move from the CITY to CANARY WHARF isnt creating new jobs"

I didn't say it was - my point is that the location of those jobs is significant. The City is relatively accessible wherever you live in London. Canary Wharf is far more accessible for people in Brockley than in most of the rest of London.

"Therefore nothing really changes - least of all in Brockley"

Yes, more people will look at the map and realised that if you work in Canary Wharf then Brockley is a convenient place to work and they will move here. The population will change. At the very least, this process is noteworthy, I would argue that it is highly significant...

I get it. You have lived in the area for a long, long time. You think people like me, relative newcomers, are ingenues whose belief that change can or will occur is misplaced. You base that on your "observations" of the last 30 years.

But what you don't realise is that change is happening and you are so jaded that you can't even see it any more.

10 years ago, the places now known as Jam Circus and the Brockley Barge were dangerous gang hangouts.

4 years ago, when I started this blog, there was nowhere to get free cash out in Brockley Cross, Costcutter was the only show in town if you wanted to try and find anything vaguely resembling fresh fruit or veg and the only cafe was Toads Mouth.

3 years ago, young families started moving in to the area with a vengeance, to the point that places like Brockley Mess and the Orchard (both new) are now full to the brim with toddlers on any given weekday. Young people moved in too, pushed here by soaring house prices and pulled by the prospect of the East London Line. Whereas Brockley used to look middle aged when you walked around, it now looks young.

2 years ago, The Talbot was a derelict heap. Coulgate Street was just taking shape.

Less than a year ago, the East London Line opened, cutting people's travel times, expanding people's options and improving frequency. Brockley's

These changes are not only interesting in their own right, they are significant in that they are changing the pattern of demand for services in the area (whether that be nurseries, coffee shops, restaurants or community groups). Supply is gradually changing to reflect that new demand.

The face of Brockley will change. These changes may not all be wholly positive, but it is my view that they will be broadly positive, in the most part, since there is so much room for growth in the area, without crowding out the best of older Brockley.

Canary Wharf isn't a decisive development on its own. But it is a small piece of the puzzle, alongside the East London Line extensions, the new station at London Bridge, the expansion of the DLR, the development of Lewisham and Deptford, the improvements in our parks, the work done to improve Brockley Common and Coulgate Street, the energy behind things like Brockley Max and the Christmas Markets, the ambition of the people behind the orchard, browns, El's kitchen, geddes, the hill station, etc, etc.

Put all those pieces together and you can see a very clear picture of change for the better.

Brockley Dogging Society said...

Anyone got a tissue?

Dante said...

You guys managed to upset Brockley Nick.

Back off Bankers! Remeber that you'll all burn in hell one day.

Anonymous said...

@nick" I get it. You have lived in the area for a long, long time. You think people like me, relative newcomers, are ingenues whose belief that change can or will occur is misplaced. You base that on your "observations" of the last 30 years".
"But what you don't realise is that change is happening and you are so jaded that you can't even see it any more."
Im not sure why you have to be so rude. I neither know nor care how long you have lived here. The fact is youre here and im willing to talk about things in a civilised fashion. This is a conversation - not a battle and at NO time have I been rude to you. Neither have i said any of the things you have assumed (above). I merely stated that CW hasnt really had a massive impact in the past and it probably wont now. (unless u can deliver "evidence" of its impact on the Talbot refurb) Your journey though this exchange has now moved you to the position of... agreeing with me
"Canary Wharf isn't a decisive development on its own"
but with added insults.

You fail to recognise that your statements are equally anecdotal and observational.
You fail to recognise that you have offered no evidence (unless CW installed the PO cash m/c)
You fail to recognise that most of brockley old and new welcome and contribute to change and inprovements to this area. You don’t need to tell me about it I was HERE to see the changes. How patronising.
But what I enjoy most is that you can judge the success of an area on how full the coffee shop is???????

“we still see them reveal themselves, till they attain to their abhorr’d ends (Alls Wells That Ends Well)

Brockley Nick said...

@anon
"I merely stated that CW hasnt really had a massive impact in the past and it probably wont now. Your journey though this exchange has now moved you to the position of... agreeing with me"

I started by writing an article saying that Canary Wharf's development is significant and I ended by saying it's significant (though not a magic wand).

You started by describing this as my "fantasy" "Thank God!" then went on to say that it will have "little" impact and ended by saying that it probably won't have a "massive impact". You've made this journey while telling me and others that we have misunderstood you.

If you're now essentially agreeing with the point of the article, then we need discuss the matter no further.

Finally, apologies if you found my use of the word "jaded" offensive, I was trying to describe the tone with which your other posts have been written - it was meant in the same way that you called me a fantasist.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
A different anon. said...

some people are also interested in the society or community they live in, that also affects those closest to them. Unless someone can point out exactly why Canary Wharf or London Bridge developments and the improved transport links have a detrimental affect I'm happy to believe it will have a net benefit effect. People with money to spend locally and paying the council tax but not drawing on many social services is good overall. Do the bar staff at the Talbot, Jam Circus, the Orchard not deserve to benefit from that? Are the Orchard owners evil bankers? Also the idea that everyone in those areas commutes to a country pile every night is laughable.

Mel said...

@anon 20.10: to clarify, I don't mind Pizza Express, I was just making the point that some people earning good salaries are happy to live in Brockley, even though (and to some extent, because) it doesn't have the accoutrements of more affluent areas.

ACA said...

I work for KPMG, and we've recently moved to CW from Blackfriars. Not an investment bank, but a firm that employs thousands of higher rate taxpayers. Quite a lot of my colleagues are finding the commute a bit of a struggle and are envious of my short journey into work. Those who are homeowners already are unlikely to sell up and move to Brockley any time soon, but those still renting are likely to pay a lot more attention to this area next time their lease is up, and it stands to reason that if they like it here as much as I do they could end up buying property here. The changes Nick has listed are all the types of things that would make Brockley more appealing to my colleagues who are in their 20s and 30s.

Brockley Kiwi said...

When my (now former) employer up sticks from the city to move to Canary Wharf in the mid noughties I made a choice to move to Brockley largely based on the ease of journey to work. I also know of a few colleagues who made the same move.

I can't comment whether the effect is strong enough to make a recognisable change in Brockley but a direct example of what Nick is referring too I think.

Ed said...

Those afraid of change usually have the most to lose. I look forward to spending some of my Canary Wharf derived disposable income at The Barge Pizza Express in two years.

The city types and families moving into this area over the last few years have and will invest locally and improve the quality of life in Brockley (see Nick's plentiful examples) in the medium to long term.

Here's a reality check for those complaining that the area's character will suffer: Communities are dynamic (this used to be trader/banker territory) and there is plenty in Brockley that needs investment and improvement.

Anonymous said...

Brockley is Brockley, it won't change overnight. Some of you are like girls attracted to dodgy geezers, girls that think they can change their bad boy into Hugh Grant.

Osh said...

"Brockley is Brockley, it won't change overnight"

No one said it would!!!!!

The article says:

"is one of the employment hubs driving Brockley’s LONG TERM development."

emmajem said...

Thank you all for providing me with an excellent read on the train down to devon for Xmas! More evidence for nick's theory fro me. Myself, boyfriend and others I know who work in banking and insurance, in CW and city, have moved to brockley in the last 3 years or so. Transport and location were major factors.

Anonymous said...

All these posts prove is that a lot of BC readers are in the financial so-called 'services', and therefore completely unrepresentative of most of the population in Brockley, or anywhere.

Paul said...

Just like to add myself to the 'unrepresentative' list of Brockley residents who work in the city for a financial services company.

ACA said...

@anon 14.05 How can we be "completely unrepresentative" if there are "a lot" of us living here? Even if you don't work in financial services you should be able to spot the flaw in the logic there.

Where are Hugh? said...

This thread needs Hugh...

Brockley Nick said...

Perhaps Hugh has finally reached his Ealing Nirvana.

Anonymous said...

'a lot of BC readers' is an infinitesimal section of the local populace

ACA said...

By that logic anyone posting here is by definition unrepresentative of the local population. In which case all the posts are equally invalid and anon@14.05 is just one unrepresentative person telling another unrepresentative person how unrepresentative they are. In which case, why bother?

In any event, who cares if we are unrepresentative of the population as a whole? It takes a relatively small number of affluent people to move to an area, taking their high disposable income with them, to influence the new types of business that open up and thrive in such areas. Those same people also tend to be more vocal and demanding when it comes to local services, local politics etc. Clearly it's not just people in the financial services sector; the broader point is that people who read BC are more than averagely interested in their local community, are more likely to be involved in local affairs and hence disproportionately influential in driving change here in Brockley.

Brockley Nick said...

"'a lot of BC readers' is an infinitesimal section of the local populace"

Population of Brockley ward in 2001 = 13,700

Total number of unique visitors to Brockley Central in 2010 = 115,000

Headhunter said...

I sincerely believe that the earlier argumentative anonymous was Ross AKA Love Detective. Am I right? Writing style seems familiar...

Anonymous said...

can you split those unique numbers down geographically to Brockley?

I don't think so

anyway, I didn't think you used the ward boundaries as your definition of brockley

Anonymous said...

Definitely more people who appear to be members of the professional classes in Brockley compared to 2007. Hussar!

Anonymous said...

The snob quotient is increasing certainly.

Anonymous said...

Is that inversely proportional to the fried chicken quotient?

Brockley Nick said...

@Anon 1620 -

No, can't split visitors geographically other than to say more than 99% of visitors are from the UK.

And you are quite right, Brockley is bigger than the ward - it was just an indicative comparison.

So, here are what I think are some reasonable assumptions:

Let's be generous and say the population of Greater Brockley is comprised of four wards - Telegraph Hill, Crofton Park, Ladywell and Brockley. That adds up to approx 60,000 people - including babies and young children, who could not reasonably be expected to play an active role in any community group.

Let's also assume that 25% of visitors in 2010 are "locals" - I think this is a reasonable guess since Google can tell us that the majority of visits to the site were direct or the result of searches like "brockley central" - ie: people who know what they are looking for. I don't flatter myself that the site is terribly interesting to non-locals.

25% of of 115,000 is 28750 - or nearly half the population of Greater Brockley. Even if you allow for the fact that some "local" visitors are people from places like Forest Hill, Lewisham, Nunhead, East Dulwich or Catford, like our old friend Fred, I severely doubt that that's more than 20% of the "locals" figure, but let's be generous and round the total number of uniques from around here down to 20,000.

That conservative figure represents one third of the entire population of all four wards.

Whatever the real figure, I think we can reasonably assert that the reach of BC in to the population is far greater than an " infinitesimal section" of local people.

Anonymous said...

If that is the case, why is it that NOBODY I've met in the Hillyfields/Tyrwhitt/Tressilian area has ever heard of BC. I was in the Talbot for the Tyrwhitt neighbourhood watch meeting a couple of weeks ago, and stayed afterwards because a young couple I know from Tyrwhitt, and then later a teacher (middle-aged) from Tyrwhitt popped in for dinner. We talked about local issues, none of them had heard of BC, and when I suggested taking a look, they sniggered.

Reg said...

Well done, BrockleyNick. It is easy for some people to become jaded over time.
You make a very convincing argument as to which way Brockley is moving - forward.
At London Bridge there are three new skyscrapers planned; and these will also have an impact on Brockley - a home from the office area.

BC regular said...

Nick, splendid though BC is, those figures seem a bit steep to me. I don't have a fixed IP address, so don't I show up as an additional unique visitor every time I log on? Which naturally is several times a day :-)

Brockley Nick said...

@Reg - Cheers, I fully understand why people feel a sense of inertia and I also agree there's a risk of overstating both the pace and benefits of change. But I think Brockley is a wonderful place and there are lots of reasons to be optimistic about its future.

@Anon - you meeting some people who don't know it is not inconsistent with the data. If 1/3 of people have used it, then 2/3 haven't. The fact that the couple sniggered at the suggestion that they might try looking at a community information site suggests they probably aren't target audience. Thank you for spreading the word though!!

I'd also add a few things:

1. I suspect that people who have moved to the area since the site was launched are more likely to have heard of it, since they will most likely have used the internet to research the area. Type Brockley in to google and you can't miss BC.

2. I have met many people who have used the site without necessarily registering or remembering that they were on Brockley Central. I interviewed the people from En Gedi in Ladywell today. One knew the site, the other didn't and then asked if it was that site where people recommended local tradespeople to eachother. A long conversation about the popularity of Rosey Riley then followed...

3. Any website favours the online, and the literate, which means that it will be very hard

4. The site grows continually. I'll round up the stats at the end of the year, but growth this year has been very strong - so if people haven't heard of it yet, they probably will, soon enough.

5. I would like to do some physical marketing - leafleting at stations, etc, but haven't got around to it yet. Was planning to do it to conincide with Jon's long-awaited BC 3.0, but that is still some way off ;)

Brockley Nick said...

@BC regular - not sure. I'm sure that there are some individual cases like yours, where there is some double counting, but again I think it is a reasonable assumption that most people log on from no-more than two IP addresses, with most logging on only at work or only at home.

I have rounded down at all times, to be on the safe side.

But even if we halved the figure of 20,000 to 10,000, that would still be 16.5% of the cumulative population of the four wards.

Any way you cut it, it's still a large enough percentage to be considered a big chunk of the local population.

How representative it is in terms of the socio-economic, racial and age profile of the average user is a different question of course, and that's a subject that's been discussed several times elsewhere.

Anonymous said...

The notion that anything has to be fully representative of the populace who happen to be sat near it is pretty flawed and increasingly old fashioned.

Anonymous said...

"I think we can reasonably assert that the reach of BC in to the population is far greater than an " infinitesimal section" of local people"


you might like to think that, but it's still just a thought that suits you, however you might seek to justify it.

Brockley Nick said...

Well I can't argue with that logic - congratulations.

Welcome to 2010 said...

FFS! How big does this site have to get before it can stop having to justify itself to anonymous people who are obviously jealous / resentful of its influence - though god knows why?

I use lots of different community sites: IT ones, photography ones, sport ones and this is obviously massive: the number of comments, the number of different people who send in requests and articles, the number of followers on Twitter, blah, blah, blah.

"Infinitessimally small" would be smaller than 1% of the population of Brockley. That's fewer than 300 people! Give over.

Brockley Nick said...

I'd be delighted if I thought BC only reached 1% of the local population at the moment, because it would mean that the site has the potential to increase its traffic by 50 to 100 times. That would give BC more than a 10 million uniques a year, with 100 million page impressions a year. That would rank us above most national newspapers.

quick brown fox said...

@Welcome to 2010 - quite right! Hard to imagine how some of the anonymice manage to type, given the size of the chips on their shoulders.

Ed said...

I'd like to take the opportunity to thank Nick for all his hard work. Merry Xmas!

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