Petition to restore empty Ladywell properties

The Ladywell Village Improvement Group has launched a petition to ask the Council to pressure owners of vacant commercial and residential properties in the town centre to bring them up to a decent standard, so that they can be put to use as functioning business premises and homes.

They write:

One of the main challenges for the regeneration of Ladywell Village been the unwillingness of some local property owners to bring empty property back into use and there are several examples of empty and poorly maintained property. These are a blight on the area and a deterrent to new businesses to move into the area.

The rotting flats above Coral bookmakers are among the worst examples of the problems that the petition is designed to address.

To show your support for this initiative, click here.

15 comments:

Robert said...

In the seventies there were many empty houses in Brockley. It was one of the first major roles of the Brockley Society to work with Lewisham Council to bring these back in to use. It did this by persuading Lewisham to make compulsory purchases, renovate the house to a good standard and add it to the stock of local council homes. It's a real shame that this option does not seem to be open to us any more.

Jonathan said...

I have often looked at the buildings over Jam Circus and George's and thought they look beautiful and neglected.
I appreciate older places take some upkeep but I think it's worth the effort

Headhunter said...

Do Coral or JC actually own the flats above or are they both just renting from some other freeholder?

Robert said...

It costs as much to improve and renovate a Victorian property as it does one that is 25 years old. All wiring has to be stripped out and replaced regardless, to meet current building regs - and plastering, painting, repairs are much of a muchness. Of course, you can go the extra mile if you want to - but it is possible to renovate modestly whilst retaining the character of the property.

What is certain is that renovation of any property is always cheaper than demolition and rebuild. It's also much more sustainable. Where developers take this route, it is almost always an attempt to get more units on the site.

Matt-Z said...

As far as I know the entire block with George's and Jam Circus in is owned by one person / family. Certainly the flats above are all rental properties. What incentive they have to make them look nice if they have easy rental money I don't know.

There were still plenty of empty properties in Brockley in the 90s, even in the conservation area. There were squat parties at different addresses every weekend.

The Fool on the Hill said...

The Council might start with its own properties. The Playtower anyone?

Sue said...

@The Fool on the Hill
The Council doesn't have the millions needed to bring the Playtower back into full use, but is in discussions with a trust set up by four local groups (Lewisham Disability Coalition, Voluntary Action Lewisham, Volunteers Centre Lewisham and the Tabernacle Church interested in taking over the building. They gave a presentation at the Ladywell Village Improvement Group this evening. They're taking things slowly to make sure they start out on a sound legal footing, but it sounds quite promising. In the meantime, the Council is supposed to be putting in some money to making the building safe, asbestos removal etc, before further work/surveys can start, and there was talk of some English Heritage money possibly in the pipeline.

Anonymous said...

Robert 08:32

Maybe the same could happen again with properties across the Borough.

sicarts@msn.com said...

I think one of the problems is Freeholders/Landlords taking a short term view with regard to renovating the units above commercial properties.
The rental yields on flats above shops in Ladywell tends to be relatively low and many landlords/freeholders/leaseholders are reluctant to invest in their properties because of the time it takes to see a return on their investment. This can also be due to their cash flow situation or their inability to get access to the finance to complete the required works.
There seems to be an abundance of reasonably affordable rental properties locally and therefore there isn't the supply and demand factor which pushes up the rental values in other more affluent parts of London.
This is good news for tenants and it is a good thing in my opinion that there are areas in London which are still reasonably affordable.
The downside is that the lower rental yields can deter some investment from landlords etc.
This is a false economy in my opinion-especially as there are usually essential repair and maintenance works which need to be carried out regardless.
Unfortunately, many of the units above commercial properties are left to deteriorate for a variety of reasons. It is sad to see the state of some of the once beautiful buildings around Ladywell.

sicarts@msn.com said...

I think one of the problems is Freeholders/Landlords taking a short term view with regard to renovating the units above commercial properties.
The rental yields on flats above shops in Ladywell tends to be relatively low and many landlords/freeholders/leaseholders are reluctant to invest in their properties because of the time it takes to see a return on their investment. This can also be due to their cash flow situation or their inability to get access to the finance to complete the required works.
There seems to be an abundance of reasonably affordable rental properties locally and therefore there isn't the supply and demand factor which pushes up the rental values in other more affluent parts of London.
This is good news for tenants and it is a good thing in my opinion that there are areas in London which are still reasonably affordable.
The downside is that the lower rental yields can deter some investment from landlords etc.
This is a false economy in my opinion-especially as there are usually essential repair and maintenance works which need to be carried out regardless.
Unfortunately, many of the units above commercial properties are left to deteriorate for a variety of reasons. It is sad to see the state of some of the once beautiful buildings around Ladywell.

sicarts@msn.com said...

I think one of the problems is Freeholders/Landlords taking a short term view with regard to renovating the units above commercial properties.
The rental yields on flats above shops in Ladywell tends to be relatively low and many landlords/freeholders/leaseholders are reluctant to invest in their properties because of the time it takes to see a return on their investment. This can also be due to their cash flow situation or their inability to get access to the finance to complete the required works.
There seems to be an abundance of reasonably affordable rental properties locally and therefore there isn't the supply and demand factor which pushes up the rental values in other more affluent parts of London.
This is good news for tenants and it is a good thing in my opinion that there are areas in London which are still reasonably affordable.
The downside is that the lower rental yields can deter some investment from landlords etc.
This is a false economy in my opinion-especially as there are usually essential repair and maintenance works which need to be carried out regardless.
Unfortunately, many of the units above commercial properties are left to deteriorate for a variety of reasons. It is sad to see the state of some of the once beautiful buildings around Ladywell.

sicarts@msn.com said...

I think one of the problems is Freeholders/Landlords taking a short term view with regard to renovating the units above commercial properties.
The rental yields on flats above shops in Ladywell tends to be relatively low and many landlords/freeholders/leaseholders are reluctant to invest in their properties because of the time it takes to see a return on their investment. This can also be due to their cash flow situation or their inability to get access to the finance to complete the required works.
There seems to be an abundance of reasonably affordable rental properties locally and therefore there isn't the supply and demand factor which pushes up the rental values in other more affluent parts of London.
This is good news for tenants and it is a good thing in my opinion that there are areas in London which are still reasonably affordable.
The downside is that the lower rental yields can deter some investment from landlords etc.
This is a false economy in my opinion-especially as there are usually essential repair and maintenance works which need to be carried out regardless.
Unfortunately, many of the units above commercial properties are left to deteriorate for a variety of reasons. It is sad to see the state of some of the once beautiful buildings around Ladywell.

Brockley Grover said...

The website 'Report Empty Homes' keeps track of some of these empty houses and flats. One of the worst local examples must be this detached property in Brockley Grove:

http://reportemptyhomes.com/report/1302

It's been unoccupied since 1988!

Anonymous said...

Above the bakers by the bridge is in a terrible state too...

Anonymous said...

Speaking of empty houses, does anyone know you might own 102 Adelaide ave? It's been empty for about 2 years. Although I did meet a nice Polish chap who was doing some work on it today. Sadly, he spoke very little english and couldn't tell me who had hired him to the do the work.

I am looking for a pace to live, and would like to stay in Brockly, so an empty property would be fine!

Please support BC by clicking here when you shop with Amazon

Brockley Central Label Cloud