Cannabis factory found in Ivy Road

Police raided a house in Ivy Road this morning, uncovering a cannabis factory. The News Shopper reports:

A cannabis factory has been discovered in Brockley following an early morning police raid.

Officers from Ladywell safer neighbourhoods team (SNT) recovered more than 200 cannabis plants yesterday morning (June 3) from an address in Ivy Road.

Full story here.

Meanwhile, a 24 page report by the Global Commission on Drug Policy concluded that the war on drugs was a massive failure and should be rethought.

37 comments:

Anonymous said...

Seems they never caught anyone but the 16 year old,no way is she the ring leader.

Tressillionaire said...

shame. need more fresh local produce.

Ian on the Hill said...

Was it organic?

Anonymous said...

As we just suffered a noisy evening
(again) at the hands of our selfish dumb neighbours, perhaps police could get some better priorities!

Tressilliana said...

The law on drugs is a mess. The proceeds from drug sales fund other criminal activities, e.g. people trafficking. I'd rather see the whole thing legalised and properly regulated, like alcohol and tobacco.

Until it gets sorted out, though, it's an offence to produce cannabis on this scale and it will always be an offence to steal electricity. I'm quite happy to see the police putting a stop to that. There's also quite a lot of evidence building up that some young people, probably with a genetic susceptibility, do have a much increased risk of schizophrenia if they start taking cannabis while they are in their teens. Not good.

Howson Road said...

If alcohol came into existence as a substance last year, the Gov would have banned it straight away...it is worse than plants.

Anonymous said...

Police Sergeant David Hawtin of Ladywell SNT, sounds more like CNT with a U in there somewhere.

Poor girl, another victim of the current laws.

Anonymous said...

Poor girl ? Bet she didn't realise the consequences,the real ones got away to start up again in another property.If the police helicopter scanned the area once a month with the heat seeker on board, a lot more would be properties found.

Anonymous said...

This is just the sort of thing Brockley Central readers should like... fresh produce, grown locally using organic methods. A home industry with zero food-miles (not counting the Pizza ordered afterwards).

Stringer Bell said...

I do like the ameture sleuthing that goes on at BC. Watching too much Police, Camera, Action! Anon 12:43?

Anonymous said...

Crimewatch actually.

Stringer Bell said...

Oh, OK. The highbrow crime busting show.

Anyway, giving a 16 year old girl a serious criminal record because she's working for someone else who is cultivating a plant that others choose to use. I feel safe in my bed.

Anonymous said...

@12.43 - I strongly doubt a 16 year old would put together something like this by herself

Anonymous said...

The arguments for and against the legalisation of certain drugs have been aired many times in the past but the fact still remains that it is illegal to be in possession of certain drugs with intent to supply.
The cultivation of cannabis plants is-to my knowledge-still against the law and the sixteen year old girl arrested at the named address would have been well aware of this.
It is all very well for certain people to take a very liberal view re the supply of illegal drugs but it is often the poor who spend disproportionate amounts of their income on them.
Cannabis can make an individual lethargic and demotivated-not what someone living on a sink estate looking for work needs.
I have known many regular user who have found it difficult to function normally due to their regular cannabis use. I have had people work for me who have deteriorated significantly due to recreational drug use.
I am convinced that the regular use of recreational drugs and our liberal tolerance of them has had a negative affect on many peoples lives.
This young girl arrested is another victim of the drugs trade but she was probably aware of the consequences when she decided to get involved in the supply of illegal drugs.
What a glamorous life!

Fat Freddys Cat said...

I was going to say something but
i've lost my thread....

Anonymous said...

One door closes another one opens.

Anonymous said...

I know many people who are addicted to tobacco. They are always poorer and sicker than the rest of the population and have little to look forward to except deteroriating health and progressive social exclusion.

I also have friends who take alcohol to excess. If anything their problems are worse and their addiction destroys relationships, sometimes renders them insensible and takes a toll on their health.

I have relatives who are addicted to prescription drugs, often many at the same time as part of regime that - it is hoped - relieves their chronic illnesses without poisoning them.

It really is a sad state of affairs. These drugs are, of course, quite legal and tobacco and alcohol are socially accepted.

This is quite a mad state of affairs because it is clear the some illegal drugs are less damaging than alcohol and tobacco and some natural remedies are more benign than prescription drugs.

How would it be if the resources of the hugely profitable pharmaceutical companies, tobacco and brewing and distilling companies were directed to coming up with a set of social drugs that were developed to minimise toxicity and addictive effects? How would it be if their production and distribution were regulated and controlled by law?

Human beings have a propensity towards seeking stimulants, some of which are very dangerous and addictive. This should be a matter of public health policy. Not a party political issue.

The only response we seem to have is to criminalise and prohibit and moralise and we seem to accept the hideous health consequences and social problems that come with criminalising addicts.

Maybe when the sixteen year old is in her dotage she might look back at the crazy situation we regard as normal today.

I wonder if the great moral/political crusade that was the war on drugs is beginning to wane?

I hope so.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13624303

max said...

Another young person delivered into the hands of criminals first and then into the criminal justice system by a blinkered law that's been perpetually propped up by hypocritical politicians that of course are never wrong and never inhaled.

johnbasil30-spam said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
got the tshirt said...

another house wrecked with holes through the floors and ceilings while the criminals make an absolute fortune which they seem to have no problem 'laundering' - and leave a stoogie to water the plants

Anonymous said...

Yep,and the electricity bypassed to boot.

TM said...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13665785

Not the only thing that is a danger to your health.........

Bites tongue.

Anonymous said...

I recently heard Prof. Nutt say that the most dangerous thing about cannabis was the effect a criminal record could have on your life.

Anonymous said...

"I recently heard Prof. Nutt say that the most dangerous thing about cannabis was the effect a criminal record could have on your life."

Yes that and the fact that it might turn you into a raving psychotic pain in the ar*e like my next door neighbour, who makes everyone's life a bit more ugly. Oh and its got more tar than tobacco. Oh and most people smoke it with tobacco, so you'll get addicted to that too. Yeah it's all good.

Anonymous said...

Erm....yes. So it's a public health issue, why is it treated as a criminal act?

Anonymous said...

Only you don't end up having 40 spliffs a day

Anonymous said...

I'd take Nutt empirical over Anon anecdotal every day of the week on the harm issue. Your sample size, causation, well just about everything is off. That's not to say you don't have a right to be cheesed off by the sound of it.

Anonymous said...

Nutt by name Nut by Nature.

number 1 said...

"As we just suffered a noisy evening
(again) at the hands of our selfish dumb neighbours, perhaps police could get some better priorities!"

Are you around the St Margaret's Sq bit of Ivy? The racket there yesterday afternoon was driving me mental and I'm wondering if it was in some way related to the hash bust. Actually. scrub that. More of a coincidence, I'd guess.

Anybody know exactly where on Ivy it happened (as babylon understandibly raided without sirens and flashing lights)?

zammo says no said...

Heh, heh, heh.... Anon @20:32, for noticing that the professor who studies addictive substances for a living has the name nutt and who resigned because the government wanted him to modify his opinion they asked him to express. BRILLIANT! Stephen Fry levels of wit displayed there.

Drugs are illegal, we can't even keep them out of our maximum security prisons, what makes you thing we can keep them of the streets by foresee of law? Perhaps, just perhaps, it's impossible to police. It's a health hazzard, deal with it as such. There are laws available for when people disturb the peace, steal, rob etc. We don't need laws specifically for choosing to consume a (potentially) dangerous substance. Is chucking a user in prison, so giving him a record, so making it even harder to rejoin society, going to make it more or less likely that he would want to anethantise himself so he dosnt have to face his problem?

[that was sarcasm in case you're a little bemused]

Anonymous said...

I doubt theres many users put in prison,a slap on the wrist at most.

Anonymous said...

The causality might be that the innately criminal take drugs and not the other way around, Ever considered that?

Lets face it drugs have actually been treated as a health problem by large parts of the state for many years now. The coppers are perhaps alone in seeing them within the framework of law (but that's hardly surprising). I'm not against complete legalisation. But if this happened I would insist that not a penny of tax payers money is spent on treatment of addiction.

If people want to take these substances they should take the consequences. If they end up in the gutter that is good for society, as it gives a clear signal to others, about actions and consequences. If they end up committing crime, then they should go to a special, ie actual, prison, and their addiction should be treated not as some excuse but as an aggravated factor in their crime.

So yes lets have a grown up debate about drugs, especially if this means at long last giving addicts the dignity of being treated as equal humans and not as some childish sub-group, as they are now, to whom so much is given and so little expected.

Anonymous said...

The innately criminal take drugs?

Alcohol, nicotine, they are drugs. They are not criminal. People get addicted to prescription drugs. Mothers little helpers, old folks with a pill box and different set of pills for every day of the week. They are not criminal.

In the past many drugs have been legal. Opium was, so was Cocaine. The legal status has changed over the years. Sometimes the law cannot make up its mind - the classification of cannabis for example.

The law on drugs is politicised and exploited on the behalf of politicians seeking votes. Nothing like a clear moralising posture to appeal to the socially conservative....but let them have their tranqulilizers and anti-depressants.

There is clear double standard, an inconsistency. We deserve better, well thoughts out policies and laws that take into account public health. Instead we get opportunist vote grabbing.

I'm afraid that won't wash anymore and it is fast becoming time for a sensible debate and for drugs to be treat as a health issue. Drug addiction, like alcohol addiction and many others affects far more than the chronic sufferer. It affects their partners and families and well. The consequences are poverty, ill health and criminalisation. It extends far beyond the individual sufferer. Their families often suffer terribly.

Prisons make things worse, it does little more than sweep the issue under the carpet into a social dustbin that makes things worse rather then better.

Watch someone die of alcoholism or the effects of tobacco. It is perfectly legal and quite terrible. Treatment for any sort of debilitating substance addiction should be easy. It isn't.

The law is an ass.

Tamsin said...

And the victims are in the supply chain as well as the end users - anyone see the BBC3 programme yesterday evening - only caught it half-way through - but with these cannabis factories in suburban streets the "gardeners" are effectively slaves, and after their prison sentence (if the authorities catch them) they are deported back to Vietnam and, it was implied, the gangs that recruited them in the first place then exact revenge for their failure.

De-criminalise it, regulate it (so only the safer bands - like low tar tipped cigarettes are sold), tax it (like with alcohol and nicotine). MS sufferers would also be much relieved.

drakefell debaser said...

Anon, 16:41

“I'm not against complete legalisation. But if this happened I would insist that not a penny of tax payers money is spent on treatment of addiction. “

I take it you are against the drive by the NHS to help people stop smoking tobacco then? Should those with a drink problem be turned away from getting help and advice from the NHS too?

One third of men and one sixth of women drink alcohol at a level that is dangerous to their health.
In 2007 in England, there were 863,000 alcohol-related hospital admissions and 6,541 deaths that were directly related to alcohol misuse. Most of these deaths were a result of alcoholic liver disease.

Source - http://ow.ly/5dIHE

Alcohol misuse is estimated to cost £2.7 billion per year so given the country has fallen on hard times we should be looking to save money and let these people deal with their own issues resulting from this legal substance, right?

“If people want to take these substances they should take the consequences. If they end up in the gutter that is good for society, as it gives a clear signal to others, about actions and consequences.”

Should they be left to die in a hospital corridor like this bloke in Manchester was? - http://ow.ly/5dIQM

“So yes lets have a grown up debate about drugs, especially if this means at long last giving addicts the dignity of being treated as equal humans and not as some childish sub-group, as they are now, to whom so much is given and so little expected.”

You talk about giving addicts dignity, treating them equally and not treating them as a childish sub-group yet seem to imply that you would advocate the absolute opposite by leaving them in a gutter as an example to society. Forgive me if I am confused.

max said...

DD, have you seen Adam Curtis' "Century of the Self"?
Anon 16:41 displays textbook focus group conflict between rational and emotional response to a public policy proposal.

drakefell debaser said...

Max, no I didn't watch it I'm afraid. I see it's available online though so will try and find time to.

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