The Brockley Fox and other stories

Then Brer Fox heard someone calling his name. He turned around and looked up the hill. Brer Rabbit was sitting on a log combing the tar out of his fur with a wood chip and looking smug. "I was bred and born in the briar patch, Brer Fox," he called. "Born and bred in the briar patch." 
- Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby

Amazon is selling copies of 'The Brockley Fox and other stories', a children's book written by Millie Marsh. According to the blurb, none of the fox's adventures involve restaurant reviews:

The Brockley Fox and Orange the Duck and the four included poems are suitable for children aged between seven to eleven years of age. The Brockley Fox begins in the Court of the King of Britain. On hearing the news that all the foxes have been hunted the bad tempered King throws a tantrum. The King demands that his two loyal Lords find him a fox to hunt. They finally find the country's last refuge for foxes - London. However, when they kidnap Brockley, the clever, handsome fox their already troubled lives become a whole lot worse and what begins as the King's greatest triumph quickly turns into his biggest nightmare. In Orange the Duck, we meet Brockley again. In this adventure he has to organise a rescue of his best human friend, Lynda's favourite toy - Orange. Unfortunatly, Orange has been tidied up and accidently thrown away into a council rubbish cart. Can Brockley and his crack animal team rescue Orange from certain doom and mend Lynda's breaking heart?

Plot: good. Characterisation: Quite good.

11 comments:

Hugh said...

Sales: laughable.

Tamsin said...

What fun! Is the Brockley Fox recognisably from Brockley - like the eponymous rocking horse in "The Horse at Hilly Fields"?

BTW may I put in a plea.. If anyone is buying this - or indeed anything - through Amazon, if you could take a little time to go to the Telegraph Hill site link down on the right on BC's home page and then to "links" (top right on that home page) and "Amazon" - the Telegraph Hill Park users group gets a small commission at no extra cost to you.

mb said...

The sequel feature Hugh, the weasel. He's stolen all the nuts from the squirrels stash, leaving it to a slow drawn out death that winter *sobs*

TM said...

You can't call a duck orange; it's like calling a lamb mint....

Anonymous said...

Could be worse, could be called Crispy.

Tamsin said...

I like it. The sort of subersive reference that makes the best children's books (and the Simpsons) work on so many levels.

Hugh said...

Which levels are those?

Brockley and New Cross Bags said...

"Crack animal team"? Are you sure this book is suitable for children? ;)

Tamsin said...

The irony of having a duck called "Orange" only appreciated by those with a liking for sophisticated cookery, or in "Winnie the Pooh" a beatifully cadenced line like "One day Rabbit and Piglet were sitting outside Pooh's front door listening to Rabbit, and Pooh was sitting with them."

And, in the Simpsons classic. The exchange between Bart and and the hobo he was hiding in the cellar (which does seem a huge cellar for a suburban house) - Bart: "Have you heard of radon?" Hobo:"No...?" Bart (as he runs up the stairs): "That's alright, then."

Anonymous said...

who is Millie Mash?

Tamsin said...

Disappointed that there were no pictures - I tend to share Alice's view at the beginning of the Adventures in Wonderland, that a book (for children) without pictures is not worth reading.

There are also two people credited with editing the book who could/should have done a much better job. Apostrophes really random and commas wrongly placed that actually impede rather than assist the flow of reading it.

The endpaper says "Printed by Amazon", so if this is one of the books that are produced one at a time to order those responsible should do some hefty corrections and re-submit before more are printed.

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