Ticket barriers open - target dishonest fare dodgers

The new ticket barriers next to the southbound platform at Brockley Station have opened, according to Thomas on Twitter. Here is a picture of the barriers, not open:

The design of the barriers is a little odd, the result of a very tight site and the little staff cabin looks like it will be the loneliest place in Brockley, but at least the days of waiting for a member of staff to deign to open the gate are behind us.

40 comments:

SamB_UK said...

Frustrating that, with all the space they have there, they've only put in three gates, which in practice will mean two in one direction and one in the other. Really not enough at busy times.

BrockleyKate said...

Yeah, ridiculous design really. Why didn't they just put them square-on to the platform? They could have included double the number!
I predict long queues on platform 2 in the evening rush hour.

Brockley Nick said...

Agree, there will be a squash.

shame said...

Also notice the steel shutter - what the betting these gates will be closed off a considerable amount of the time

Monkeyboy said...

Cheer up! you'd be really unhappy if you know what the suppliers charge for those barriers.

(guessing but there may have been runn-off areas required on each side that would have caused problems with the stepps to the Ticket Office or ont/off the platform)

Anonymous said...

Probably designed by the same idiot who created the North bound Canada Water changeover to the Jubilee line..genius!

Anonymous said...

Anon 16:30

That interchange and the short platforms at Canada Water Overground are the fault of the accountants. Few things are built with any foresight.

kolp said...

Really disappointing, it's not about the customer.

Anonymous said...

Are people really munging over this? Reminds me of the community reaction to Speedicars' sign.

Brockley Ben said...

That headline has fair [sic] cheered me up. Thank Nick.

Anonymous said...

if you're fat with mung beans it'll be a squeeze, if you're slim and lithe because of the organic veg you've necked you'll be able to slip through without parting the gates - at last - a true, objective measure of the Brockley resident

Anonymous said...

I think they look fantastic! There's also a side gate that they will obviously open at rush hour - so no probs!

Anonymous said...

I went through this evening, there was a queue.

Anonymous said...

I really don't see the problem with having to wait for a few minutes to go through a ticket barrier to get out of a station.

Re the location queries, they would have needed to design with a holding space as you can't queue people on the platform for H&S reasons. So I agree the site has major limitations and they have done what they needed (yes I work in construction)

NotSoSlim said...

The side glass walls don't reach down to the floor so if you're slim you could try to slide out underneath

Anonymous said...

Talking of barriers....

Has anyone else noticed at London Bridge the random way staff control the flow of people with the barriers leading from platforms 1-6 to the tube ticket area?

The combination of escalators and the random switching of which gates (sometimes gate) is issued to exit or enter could lead to a dangerous situation in the enclosed area at the bottom of the esclators.

Before this summer who's ever in charge neeeds to sort out how the pedestrian flow is to be controlled or possibly face prosecution.

Why not make the all the Tooley Street barriers entry only to the overground, and all the ones on the otherside exits to the underground?

And remove any retail units inline with the barriers to asssist the flow of pedestrians.

Anonymous said...

Those retail units sell honest fare - proper grub to fuel your journey to Brockley

Anonymous said...

London Bridge is under development so will continuously change, not just due the Shard, but also due to ThamesLink and a NR scheme, so if I remember rightly the entire station will be changed over the next few years (used to work on The Shard so had coordination discussions with NR)

kolp said...

Queuing when you previously didn't have to will obviously bug people. It slows people down. It's no benefit to them. It's good for the train compny as it secures fares and enables monitoring.But it is a waste of precious time, funnelling people in this way by machine.

Brockley Ben said...

@kolp It may not be a perfect solution, but cutting down on fare dodgers benefits everyone (except the feeloaders). Or do you enjoy subsidising other people's free travel?

kolp said...

Yes it is far from a perfect solution.
As i wrote, my issue is with funnelling people in this way,

I don't mind subsidising free travel for the very young & the old.

Brockley Ben said...

@kolp What you actually said is it's going to "bug" people for whom it is of "no benefit". I say that in the long run it absolutely benefits you, me and everyone else who buys a ticket. Subsidising the young and the old is all very well. Subsidising those who think public transport equates to free transport? Not so much.

Queuing is a relatively minor issue, not to mention a national hobby.

kolp said...

Er this is why don't like posting on here. You can read but your comprehension is poor. I'm not interested in pointless non-arguments. Cheerio!

Crofty said...

At least the queuing will be more organised than the lines to touch in and out at the old gate, when you'd get people pushing in with far more ease than you do at real ticket barriers. The new barriers weren't open on very late train last night which is a bummer because that seems to be when most of the fare-dodgers seem to be out and about.

Osh said...

What a peculiar sulk from Kolp. It's always the strange ones who fly off in a huff because someone's 'not getting' them.

Kolp, Ben was making very sensible points. You sounded like you were saying something how we all just want to be free and the man is keeping us down with his machines, funneling us through ticket barriers. The usual from you.

Earl said...

I remember ten years ago plus when there were no barriers at London Bridge or Charing Cross or any of the smaller stations. It was pointless buying a ticket as they were never checked.

Now there are barriers at all the stations, so this argument about cutting down on fare dodging doesn't really work. As people were forced to go through the gate in the ticket office. Most people use oyster now so the chances of gates being open at both ends of your trip are tiny and because you don't want to have incomplete journeys everyone touches in. Proper fare dodgers are just going to block the sensor and follow someone through regardless, admittedly much harder at small stations because the staff are standing so close.

The gates are never open until the staff go home at night. This new gate won't change that, all it does do is make you able to not have to go up and down the stairs if you live east side. Someone said they'll open them if it gets busy, no they obviously won't.

Crofty said...

But lots of fare dodging late at night as I said - barriers are open at London Bridge late, and they're open at Brockley too. Aggravating as they're not even trying to stop the fare dodgers.

patrick1971 said...

We had exactly this discussion when they put gates in at New Cross when I lived there. It was talked up by the railway company at the time as a way to cut fare dodgers, yet as soon as the gates had been put in, the staffing hours were cut, so after about 8pm, when most fare dodgers are about, the station is always open.

Brockley Ben said...

Completely agree that the practice of opening up barriers late at night renders the anti-far dodging rationale far weaker. I don't understand why it's necessary. Tube stations don't give up pn tickets at 10pm.

kolp said...

Osh you are just bad and abusive to boot. Well done!

Anonymous said...

I was taught to queue properly and fairly but then I was brought up properly; travelling on public transport you come to realise that seemingly few people have been.

It does seem silly to make people queue when they are eager to get home of an evening.

Anonymous said...

I for one love the new gating enclosure. It was a side gate before which was often broken. It really improves my journey as I have a serious disability. Thankyou to Boris Johnson for making my few remaining years a little easier.

Anonymous said...

Good to hear a disabled perspective on this. Whingers shame on you......

Anonymous said...

What about those of us who are offended by glass?

kolp said...

"The disabled" are not a homogenous mass. What's good for a visually challenged is not necessarily so for a paraplegic.

Westsider said...

"Shame"? What are you talking about? Because a saintly disabled person says they like it, anyone who doesn't is worse than Stalin?

And what has Boris got to do with it FFS?

Monkeyboy said...

Kolp, the LU term is VIP (visually impaired person) need to get your acronyms correct.

LU work closely with charities and advisory groups on all sorts of disabilities, it's one of the more enlightened bodies out there. Glass is fine so long as you put contrasting strips in the correct places.

By the way, ken was involved in the mobility impaired improvements. It's also driven by the DDA legislation introduced by national government, it's no longer a nice to have. It's the law to make reasonable adjustments. . It came on stream during Boris's reign. They all deserve a pat on the back.

kolp said...

I don't work for LU so the colloquial term (not acronym) I used is fine.

Anonymous said...

The official TFL term is "isn't it time for a tea break?"

Monkeyboy said...

Many PERSONS who are VISSUALLY IMPAIRED are not actually blind. Engineers and architects understand so you don't need to.

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