The New Cross Dining Co

The New Cross Dining Co is the latest pop-up restaurant to emerge in the area, which now has more supper clubs than actual restaurants.

These guys say their club was "born out of a desire not to have to go East for innovative dining experiences" and will be taking over The London Particular for dinner in May.


Dates: Thurs 10th May - Sat 12th May Thurs 17th May - Sat 19th May
Starts: 7.30pm on Thursdays and 8pm on Friday and Saturdays.
Address: The London Particular, 399 New Cross Road

Reservations are available via their website.

80 comments:

MikeSE13 said...

The menu sounds fantastic, but £30pp? jesus, I thought that we were in a time of austerity. I'm not asking for every eating establishment to cater to the lipstick effect, but I can easliy take my family of 4 out for a semi swanky meal for a bit more than the £60 that I would fork out for me and the missus to have a 'kid free' dinner. Good luck though to all involved.

Anonymous said...

http://theoatmeal.com/blog/restaurant_popular

Anonymous said...

Yep, £30 pp is far too steep considering you can get set lunches /dinners for less at some Michelin starred places. I thought pop up/supper clubs also meant they could cut back on the overheads of traditional restaurants and offer better value?

Brockley Nick said...

Don't think it's worth it, don't go, but it will only be "far too steep" if they don't sell out. If they sell the places, then it's priced appropriately.

Supper clubs come in all shapes and sizes, they're not necessarily a cheap alternative to a restaurant.

Anonymous said...

Middle class people call their tea their "supper", I find.

whealie said...

Is this like in France where the set menu includes half a bottle of wine each? At that price it must be, surely?

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, only middle class people eat "fish suppers".

Anonymous said...

At least they are an excellent example of a pop up that has a vegetarian option! Shows that it can be done, contrary to what some other pop up organisers of late have said.

Anonymous said...

I'd go, but sweet breads is the only meat main course... would be good to have another option, maybe the next one ...

THNick said...

If the quality is very good then £30 seems reasonable to me. It's clearly not cheap but I don't think they're aiming for a cheap meal.
And I can't see how this sort of supper club "avoids the overheads of a restaurant". It's based in a cafe/restaurant, not in someone's house, so surely it comes with the same costs.

Anonymous said...

I initially thought people were being a bit ridiculous moaning about paying £30 for a meal. But, having just looked at the menu I'm inclined to agree. I'm sure it will be delicious but it's relatively simple and nothing that couldn't be done pretty easily home. Although in the east something like young Turks seemed much better value. I hope it is a success though and I am sure it would be a nice way to meet others.

Anonymous said...

For anyone who doesn't know what sweetbread is - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_bread

It's £30 for offal?

Brockley Ben said...

Like supper clubs, offal comes in all shapes and sizes. Sweetbreads are at the luxury end (and are bloody delicious).

hladik said...

I'd wager it's the very fact they are offering veggie options that is driving the cost up to £30pp - more fresh produce to buy, less economy of scale savings to be made.

Certainly what I found when I tried a similar (albeit private) venture with some friends last year. We set an ambitious price of £15pp, and ended up having to chip in an extra tenner per person from our own pockets to actually get the food on the table.

Whilst supper clubs don't have the same overheads as established restaurants, they also don't have the bulk purchasing power or (generally) the ready stocked pantry. So that pinch of baking powder in the dessert isn't a few pennies, it's a couple of quid for a whole pot of baking powder and so on...

hladik said...

Realised as I hit 'publish' that I left myself open to 'dishonest fare' criticism for suggesting baking powder costs a couple of quid!

Let's switch that out for sherry vinegar eh?

Anonymous said...

Sweetbreads are available in the Lewisham Food Centre, for tuppence.

Shame said...

Sweetbreads are delicious, as is ham hock - but on the cheap end of meats. I'm inclined to agree that if this is without wine, it is terribly expensive. I understand we can choose not to go; but the nature of Brockley central means hat as well as advertising, you also get comments on your offering

NXG_Resident said...

I think if you think of it as a socialising event in addition to it being a dining event (the London Particular only has one main table anyway, so diners really have to be social), then it doesn't seem so expensive.

You're paying for the intimacy and exclusivity of the experience too.

mb said...

"you can eat the same at home far cheaper" erm....yes. You can drink at home cheaper and watch a DVD at home cheaper. Some people like to socialise with people and perhaps like to be cooked for. It's called 'going out'

By the way Mike+Ollie will be offering vegi options at some point, they do at their stall. He was working out of a cafe kitchen in a train carriage so didn't want to offer too many different things.

Brockley Nick said...

@Shame - yes, sure. It's not advertising though, they didn't even ask me to write about it, althought they did start following BC on Twitter.

I do get very weary about people going on about price all the time though. There are lots of things I don't buy because I don't think they are worth it - cups of tea from a coffee shop, that I can make myself at work for free, taxis at night if I can get a night bus, etc, etc. But I understand that other people have different priorities and are prepared to pay more for things.

I will bet a lot of money that the profit they will be making on this exercise will be minimal. It costs what it costs. It's not like there are lots of barriers to entry for pop-up dining, so if it's a goldmine, we could all give it a go.

Brockley Nick said...

And I bet everyone who says it is too expensive has spent more than £30 for a night out in the past.

Anonymous said...

Compared to the Mike&Ollie offering it does seem a bit limited, three not that exciting courses. And cost is an issue for some of us, sorry to mention it but we don't all live in the Mung World.

Anonymous said...

Can you imagine being stuck on a plane with the dribbling halfwit who's satire is limited to mung jokes and the occasional knock knock joke? Surprised the 25watt brain is sufficient to power breathing and walking at the same time.

Anonymous said...

Did I rattle your Farrow and Ball coated Mung cage? Sorry...

Anonymous said...

Good value CAN be done in restaurants though. For example last night I treated a friend and myself to the lobster at Top Chef and we came away with a fair chunk of change from our budgets. Just saying.

Anonymous said...

can a cage be mung?

Anonymous said...

If 'mung' ever had any meaning it's been well and truly lost. I thought it meant hippyish but the poster above is just using it to mean rich.
I don't think the people using it think too hard...

kolp said...

Perhaps due to the plethora of cookery shows on telly, almost eveyone's a foodie. There was even a Resturant idol type programme with one of the roux boys, so many know the tricks of the trade...

Anonymous said...

Meanings change and words with ambiguity probably get used more in common parlance, than those with very precise meaning. What does 'nice' mean? Mung is a lot more precise I'd say. BTW If you object to the word, then you definitely are one in my book.

Anonymous said...

Nice means pleasant or agreeable. That hasn't changed.
What does 'mung' mean to you then?

Anonymous said...

'Mung' on BC generally means middle/upper middle class upbringing, couple of kids (especially with mop-headed haircuts), vegan/vegetarian tendancies, support of tokenistic environmental ventures whilst ignoring bigger picture (twee shopping bags etc, or instistance on GM-free food), one or both parents in job like PR, public sector or artisan crafts, type of person who complains to the council about things on a regular basis. That is the definition of mung, to me.

I Am Mung said...

From my observations Mung is used to describe any of the following people:

Well educated.
Those with a strong ethical and social consciousness.
Successful in their chosen career.
Fashion conscious.
Able to use social media and the internet to learn and challenge themselves, rather than hurl abuse at other people anonymously.
Interested in their environment and their impact on it.
An all-round appreciation for life in a bustling city.

Mung has come full circle and I see it as a compliment.

Brockley Nick said...

Well, for example, you say, "job like PR, public sector or artisan crafts" I work in PR and my job have nothing much in common with someone who works in the public sector, except that we both work in "offices", and less still in common with the job of a craftsperson.

So basically you're saying "someone who has an office job or who doesn't - you know the sort".

Not sure what "vegetarian tendencies" are - someone who doesn't insist on packing as much red meat in to their colon at every given opportunity.

Anonymous said...

That's a very wide definition. If, say, I eat meat most days and work in an office but have two children and re-use a shopping bag - does that make me a 'mung'?

DJ said...

My definition of 'thick twat' is someone who bangs on about others being' mung'.
If you object to that then you definitely are one.

Anonymous said...

If you keep reacting it'll keep happening...

Anonymous said...

This thread has gone very mung. It's simple, if you don't know what it means, I can't tell you. The essence seems a po-faced and rather pompous attitude towards both self and the world, it often screams from the prose on this blog.

Anonymous said...

I think there's a lot of envy in 'mung'. It basically means 'better educated, better standard of life and better off than me'. Admit it.

Anonymous said...

Only a mung would be sooooo.... simplistic.

Brockley Dogging Society - Demographic Analysis Department said...

Nick, some of our members specifically "insist on packing as much red meat in to their colon at every given opportunity" so by that definition are not of the Mung tendancies.

Having said that all members are sound, friendly, thoughtful, inteligent individuals who do not revel in spewing childish mean spirited drivel while chuckling to themselves. You know the sort, yer basic idiot.

Anonymous said...

"...if you don't know what it means, I can't tell you"
Translation: I don't know what it means, I've just seen others using it and am a bit thick and lazy.

Anonymous said...

"It basically means 'better educated, better standard of life and better off than me'. Admit it."

No that is the self image of the mung. The problem is often, they just aren't.

pompous prose said...

'It's simple, if you don't know what it means, I can't tell you'

I.e. I haven't a scooby doo myslef but I like using it to troll...

Anonymous said...

I think it's your 'self image' that need help - low self esteem is often a factor in internet trolling.
Get out a bit and stop worrying about what others do - where they eat or shop or what class they are.
Life is too short.

Anonymous said...

Psycho-babble, very mung.

Anonymous said...

Sounds like everything and everyone is 'mung' to you. Must be pretty lonely over there.

Anonymous said...

£30 for a chef to cook some pretty exciting food in an intimate atmosphere (and come on guys, are we all expert chefs that we can cook this at home?! I think not...) I for one will at least give it a go, and will be the judge afterwards on whether it was good value for money, not before. And its nice someone is paying attention to the South East, I don't always want to go North East for these types of experiences. Hopefully these guys will bring us some more excitement in the future!

Anonymous said...

Please try harder, I'm a troll, I need better feeing than that.

DJ said...

It's very simple - just type 'mung' randomly under every comment.
No more imagination or wit required apparently.

Anonymous said...

Typing? Very mung.
On the internet? The mung-ternet I call it.

Anonymous said...

"Well educated.
Those with a strong ethical and social consciousness.
Successful in their chosen career.
Fashion conscious.
Able to use social media and the internet to learn and challenge themselves, rather than hurl abuse at other people anonymously.
Interested in their environment and their impact on it.
An all-round appreciation for life in a bustling city."

You forgot,
'Totally up themselves',
oh but wait, you illustrated that with a super lucidity in your self congratulatory if not very self aware list. Pure mung, I'd say.

Foxberry Flo said...

Dear BC regulars, and Nick.

PLEASE STOP reacting to trolls. They are ruining the blog, and you're letting them.

Nick, it's your blog, why do you approve their comments for publication?

Anonymous said...

Back to the point, these menus do not look to me the work of "talented chefs" and £30 is way too much to pay for someone's hobby. I would be into it if what they were doing was interesting; if there were amuses-bouches, coffee, a plate of tiny beautiful sweets AS WELL as dessert, and a half-bottle of wine included, but this appears not to be the case. If you want the intimate atmosphere of the single table, go to London Particular for a meal on any other day of the year. That said, I don't doubt some people will go, but not those of us who are proper mungs and not just tourists.

Brockley Nick said...

@Flo - I don't "approve" any comments. People write stuff and unless it breaches our acceptable comment policy, it stays.

Besides which, I was enjoying for once, the anon trying to define what mung was. I always knew he didn't actually know, now we have the proof.

Furthermore, were it not for the unfortunate troll, we wouldn't have had Anon 1622's post, which made me ROFL.

Anonymous said...

It looks to me as if we have some very clear examples above of what "mung" is. The mungs themselves have taken exception to this and implied it means everything (i.e. nothing) which isn't really what's being shown...

Anonymous said...

Yep, something odd about the menu. Sweet bread is doughnuts and stuff. Brusetta??

New Cross Dining Co. said...

Hey! In response to some of the comments, we are only featuring professional chefs who have worked in well-established restaurants and want to experiment with their own menus. If it turns out to be too expensive for the area we’ll have a rethink, we want to stay around here, that’s the whole point... And we don’t want it to be a pretentious affair, we are hoping it will be fun, we called it a supper club because this event is a communal dining experience. We’re new, we’re learning but stick with us! Oh, and come?

Brockley Ben said...

@NCDC Thanks for clarifying. What's the booze situation? BYO?

Anonymous said...

@Flo Tutt tutt
Censorship? Yipp you've guessed it, that too is very, very ****

I think the reason so many of you are having problems with the concept is that it is complex and rather multi-layered. You need a certain mental fluidity to get it. A lot of you seem rather flat footed and literalist if I may say so, which is just a little bit ****.

Anonymous said...

Jesus, let it go. You think everyone is mung. We get it. It's boring. Now please fuck off.

Anonymous said...

Actually, you probably aren't.

Anonymous said...

Just paid £10 for an indifferent mass produced lasgne at Prezzo, if I'd had a starter it would have been £16 and I couldn't have had a sweet because they don't do puddings. So, in comparison, £30 for an imaginative menu that is cooked by a professional chef with an interest in good food sounds a fair deal.

Mondee said...

Agreed. And some people have compared it with mike + ollie, whose pop-up restaurant I went to and I believe it was £25 before booze if I remember correctly, so not much different. However, it did include a pre-dinner cocktail and a lethal night cap. And more courses, although they were small in size and mainly things on bruschetta. And by the way, if these guys are professional chefs they should know how to spell bruschetta. Knowing how to pronounce it might be a step too far, given that such luminaries as Gordon Ramsay don't even know that.

Anonymous said...

Must admit the first thing I look for in a professional chef is how they can spell.

Mondee said...

I didn't say it was the first thing, now, did I? I talked about the food first and foremost. However, I would consider it normal for a professional chef (or a keen amateur chef, or a waiter who has to talk about menus to customers) to have an interest in food and where dishes originate from etc, and being able to pronounce a dish properly sounds more convincing. As for spelling, an inability to spell something you are preparing I feel indicates a lack of attention to detail. It would be very easy to get someone to check it before putting it on a website. Or refer to any Italian cookbook or Internet recipe.

New Cross Dining Co. said...

We bow to you Brockley Central, menu now £25. We also welcome Mungs and non-mungs alike!

New Cross Dining Co. said...

We've also changed, Broad bean brushetta to Potted Broadbeans and not just because we can spell that!

Anonymous said...

Hooray! Honest fare :-)

kolp said...

Awesomeness, the Olympics organisrs could learn a thing here. I'll be booking as soon as i can.

Anonymous said...

If I were starting a new business, I'd keep it quiet around here. BC is the last place I'd want it mentioned.

Potted broad beans sounds better.

Stating the bleeding obvious said...

Using a website that people choose to read to promote a supper club would be an obvious choice. Paying someone to Stuff an unwanted flyer through your door is an alternative I suppose.

Susspect I'm not the first to spot the irony of you finding out about, being pleased and comenting on the menu change using the very site you think is a bad idea amusing.

Anonymous said...

I'm happy with the price and menu and considering going (I presume I'm very mung), but the reservation service is ridiculous.

You have to buy tickets - so pay the money now. Ok, this isn't too bad, but you then have to pay a 9% booking fee! So the £30 (which is still charged despite the menue now being supposedly £25) becomes nearly £33 and the £25 is £27.25.

This is just odd...

Mondee said...

I suppose that is a bit misleading but booking in advance is a necessity, I would say. Mike and Ollie had people who didn't turn up, which must have been very annoying for them as they had bought and prepared the food for those people - not to mention the fact that there was a long waiting list of people who could have taken advantage of the unused places.

NXG_Reisdent said...

Don't agree Mondee as there are other ways that potential diners can pay NCDC beforehand, cutting out the We Got Tickets middleman.

Anonymous said...

You're so busy being pleased about stating the bleedin' obvious you don't read the comments.

Anonymous mung said...

This the funniest thread I have read in ages...

Good luck with the supper club. Sounds fun.

newcrossdiningco said...

We didn't realise that it takes Wegottickets 24 hrs to update changes, so the new price should be updated tomorrow morning...and yes, we have to take bookings so we know how many people to cater for...but if you don't want to pay the booking fee and can suggest an alternative, it's fine by us!

Anonymous said...

Can't we book and pay in person at the London Particular?

Anonymous said...

With good honest cash?

newcrossdiningco said...

@ Anonymous, if you'd like to email us direct about booking, info@newcrossdining.co, i'm sure we can work something out!

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