The Old Milk Float

In the third in our unplanned series of articles about the eccentric machines parked on our pavements, we can now reveal the purpose of the milk float that has been exciting BC readers on Upper Brockley Road. And before anyone pipes up to suggest that this is some sort of device for delivering milk to people's homes, it isn't. That would be too easy.

John Burtt explains:

I'm an events organiser, who's hoping to return milk floats to the streets of London via a series of events and festivals. So far, my company The Old Milk Float has put on a Diamond Heist (www.theartfulbadger.com) in Islington, created a food fight in an art gallery, and last week we threw a 'kid's rave' in Ruskin Park for 'Trees For Cities'.

This year, the float will be at everything from Lovebox to the Olympics, so keep an eye out for the float on your travels around the area.

20 comments:

Helen said...

On a similar note, anyone know what's with the massive army truck permanently parked on the railway bridge on Avignon Road?

Anonymous said...

Good point, that army truck has been there for a good couple of years now.

There is also a working milk float that operates westside

Anonymous said...

Was talking about the float just the other day.... thanks!

Anonymous said...

I used to have milk delivered at Telegraph Hill. I think they still do deliveries.

Anonymous said...

They're a really green idea and should be revived and not seen as old-fashioned.

Not Jeremy Clarkson said...

Electric vehcles are not seen as old fashioned, these particular types are. They use clunky lead acid batteries and are heavy, there are better alternatives.

Tamsin said...

Dairy Crest definitely still do deliveries around Telegraph Hill (Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays). You can also go on-line to change, cancel, add to your order up to 9pm the evening before and there is a whole range of other stuff they will deliver like biscuits, butter, butter types, bread, cheese, eggs, etc. etc. The milk is more expensive than the supermarket or cornershop equivalent, but far more convenient. Also reusing glass bottles feels greener than recycling plastic ones. (Although I expect to be shot down on that...)

Anonymous said...

"Greener feeling" bottles, delivered using twee technology and with a hefty price premium? Brockley should lap it up.

Anonymous said...

A milk float is "twee technology"?
If a milk float is twee technology what do you call an i-pad? Or even a radio?

Anonymous said...

It's definitely twee in the same way as local nonsense shops putting bags of rice in hessian bags or putting jam in jars with silly tops on them is twee - neither are modern technology.

Mb said...

I shouldn't have mentioned the rice. The anons are clustering on it like blue bottles on a ripe turd.

Anonymous said...

Is the turd organic?

Mb said...

....it's corn fed.

Anonymous said...

Excellent. Call it "pan fried" and literally name your price.

Anonymous said...

Dear Anonymous 4 April 2012 21:04

The word "twee" does not mean "not modern". Stonehenge is not modern, but it is not twee. A cafe decorated in Beatrix Potter illustrations would be modern and twee.

Electric milk-floats are useful vehicles delivering a useful product to people who don't want to spend their lives visiting the supermarket or corner shop every day. They are exactly as twee as Sainsbury's home delivery and use less petrol in the process.

Mondee said...

It can't have been much of a rave with only one kid.

Anonymous said...

Indeed, there is sensible reason for electric delivery vehicles. All that short distance stopping and starting would not be good for a petrol or diesel engine.

Pity they cannot deliver all my Internet purchases as well.

Tamsin said...

The way petrol and diesel prices are going one day they will. Mark you in Bromley the posties use bicyles which goes several steps further.

As the other anon said, it's convenience of having milk delivered as much as the principle that I am prepared to pay for. And in part maintaining the useful social service a regular milk round provides in a check on the elderly and isolated - if the milk has not been taken inside there might be something amiss.

Anonymous said...

Like in so many areas the supermarkets and their loss leaders and plastic bottles undermined the economics of milkfloats and doorstep delivery.

Supermarkets would introduce such a service if they were stripped of the considerable advantage they have acquired by being granted permission to maintain large car parks.

Tamsin said...

It is great, though, that the Dairies have introduced the on-line service for those with internet access. You no longer have to rely on chancy notes but can still realise at 9pm that you have run out of eggs and get some delivered the following morning. I only hope, however, that they continue with the old-fashioned ways for those who don't use the web - otherwise they will be letting down the demographic which they best serve.

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