The Telegraph Hill Beacon

Lord Summerisle: Good afternoon, Sergeant Howie. I trust the sight of the young people refreshes you. Sergeant Howie: No sir, it does not refresh me.
- The Wicker Man


Peter sent us this shot of the Telegraph Hill beacon, lit to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee, to remind us of a time when it wasn't too damp to kindle a fire.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Huhmm. Don't really see why they bothered. Its just a fire for the sake of having a fire. Wasn't an official one or anything.

Cheer up, you could be French. said...

If it had been "official" would that have been acceptable? It really doesn't matter, it's symbolic & slightly eccentric. Much like the institution of the monarchy itself.

Anonymous said...

If it was official it would have served a purpose but it's just a bonfire. No real symbolic meaning in setting fire to a bunch of wood for a jubilee.

CUYCBF said...

What purpose? To transmit an important message quickly across hundreds of miles? Rejoice! Rejoice! 60 glorious years! There is no point, I heard about that on the TV and Twitter. Beacons and telegraphs of this type fl out of use hundreds of years ago so no, official or unofficial. They serve no point. Now, on the other hand if you consider them to be a bit of fun and some how an ancient communication method fits with an ancient institution (which is also of dubious utility) then I say it makes not a jot of difference whether the Beacon Master General or whatever approved it.

Tamsin said...

It was official - Queen's Pageant Master approached the RICS - wanting 60 or so "anchor beacons" - in theory what other beacons would take their lighting time from - across the country - RICS approached Lewisham.

Ground preparation done by Glendale at the request of Lewisham, wood procured by RICS (slightly worryingly the trainee quantity surveyor in charge of that side of it arranged for about twice as much as was needed!), wood shifted (first from delivery skip to dry shelter and then from dry shelter to beacon site) by volunteers from RICS and the Park Users Group.

A lovely evening - I've got some other photos I should share with people - and made more so by clear skies, a great view of the fire works and a stunning full moon low on the eastern horizon.

And with the laid back non-publicity we had a reasonable crowd to sing the National Anthem - but coming without expecatations of ancillary activities.

Tamsin said...

Old communication methods - I recall getting the first inkling that something had happened the morning Princess Diana died by seeing a flag at half mast driving along Chelsea embankment. Stopped off just before getting onto the motorway to pick up the papers and - interestingly given the later hoo-ha about the whole issue - matter reinforced in that brief glimpse you get of Windsor Castle from the M4 - flag there also at half mast.

CUYCBF said...

THANK GOD! So long as the Queens Pageant Master approved it. That means that a rather sad little pile of smouldering sticks is instantly transformed into a blazing messenger of joy to the happy subjects of SE4. No doubt anon will instantly declare it a triumph.

Anonymous said...

Where has the flagpole gone? It was missing today.....

Anonymous said...

@CUYCBF

Happy to oblige and counter your rather sad and depressive mental attitude. It was a triumph. A small one, but a triumph and great fun. Thanks to all those who arranged it.

Sorry if that does not fit into your sarcastic mindset.

Brockley Nick said...

I think CUYCBF actually made a good case for the beacon lighting - you have misread their post.

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