Badgerbrook Breads

Lucky Day: Wherever there is injustice, you will find us. 
Ned Nederlander: Wherever there is suffering, we'll be there. 
Dusty Bottoms: Wherever liberty is threatened, you will find... 
All: The Three Amigos!
- The Three Amigos



Tacey is a Brockley baker - describing herself as a Bread Angel, stepping in where real bread is required - who works under the name of Badgerbrook Breads (Brockley being the olde Englishe name for Hovis)

She is also launching a series of one-day classes on how to make basic bread starting in September 2012 at the Ackroyd Centre in Forest Hill. Classes begin at 11am and finish at 3pm. £60 covers all materials, tuition and lunch.

Visit her website for details.

26 comments:

Andy said...

"Brockley being the olde Englishe name for Hovis". Damn, you beat me to it.

All we need now is for someone to call somewhere The Artisan's Honest Fare or similar and watch commenters go apopleptic.

Tressilliana said...

Well, somebody's got to say it - £60 per person for a four-hour class teaching you to do something that you can really, really easily learn from a basic cookery book?

Osh said...

That's what it costs her to hire the venue, provide the materials, market the events and provide lunch, while making a little bit of money for herself, to make the thing worthwhile.

If you don't want to pay that, don't.

Allinson said...

I just haven't got the dough.

Sara said...

It's not really, really easy for everyone to learn how to bake bread from a book - it's great if you've got the skill, but yeast is a complicated ingredient and I've had enough bread disasters in the kitchen to think this class could be very useful to me!

Cookbooks are great but not all explain the techniques and reason behind what you are doing - for example if your liquid is too hot it will kill the yeast and your bread will never rise. This is where I think having a professional alongside you to explain these things would be helpful.

Anyway - my point is I think this is a great idea.

Anonymous said...

Having tried to make bread myself from a book and failed miserably, some expert tuition makes a lot of sense to me.

Learning technique is all about little details, good practice and having confidence. Books rarely do a good job of teaching skills.

Coming from the perspective of someone who was never taught how to cook or bake. If I come away having learnt a useful skill that will allow me to regularly fill my home with the smell of freshly baked bread, the cost seems perfectly reasonable.

kolp said...

This is a good service to offer, empowering people with skills. As s Jamie Oliver and Delia Smith have shown there is a huge market of people who do not have clue how to cook or make food to feed themselves.

Many are frightened off having tried to do adventurous stuff in books so for them a bit of hand holding a course like this offers is comforting.

Tressilliana said...

Well, I stand corrected. I taught myself from a Delia Smith book and I don't think I've ever had a disaster with yeast, but I suppose I did have the advantage of having grown up in a home where many cakes were baked. All you need is a systematic approach and not to be in too much of a hurry. Elizabeth David's book English Bread and Yeast Cookery is wonderful, and a very good read even if you never try a single one of her recipes.

I suppose this is what Nick means when he says that people are prepared to pay for a pleasant experience outside their homes.

kolp said...

It's a tale of two Britain's there's people on the breadline, queueing at food banks, and then there's us lot in Brockley...

Anonymous said...

Brockley: on the artisan breadline.

Anonymous said...

kolp you could always share your wealth.

Anonymous said...

Making good bread isn't rocket science. And it's really cheap.

Anonymous said...

Tressilliana, it is rather like people I know who pay up to fifty pounds for a litre of olive oil. I don't get it but each to his or her own.

I could easily spend the whole amount on Crofton Park's Victoria sponges though....

Tamsin said...

It'll give you confidence to know when things feel, look and smell right. Good luck to her.

Flour is no longer cheap but decent loaves cost a fortune even in the supermarkets. When both my student children are at home we're baking every two or three days.

Anonymous said...

Supermarket basics flour is still cheap and honest fare to boot.

Tamsin said...

Haven't actually tried bread-making with flour not labelled as "strong" - and even the own brand of that has gone up about 25% in the past couple of years. Fanciet stuff is ridiculously expensive and - like the olive oil - probably not worth the differential.

Anonymous said...

http://www.tesco.com/groceries/Product/Details/?id=258289700

Good, honest flour.

Anonymous said...

Tescos 2 kg strong white bread flour: 60p. Whats expensive?

Anonymous said...

Sorry should have said 1.5 kg = 60p at Tesco

Anonymous said...

While I know little about bread, I simply cannot understand why people have difficulty with stuff like computing and DIY.

It depends how your mind works, I guess.

Beyond parody said...

"Good, honest flour" Hahaha. You utter bellend.

Tamsin said...

Thanks for the tip about Tescos - should go there for bulk buys. In Sainsbury's - where they will sell you fresh yeast - it's 77p

http://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/sainsburys-price-comparison/flour/sainsburys_strong_white_bread_flour_15kg.html

(sorry, can't remember the coding)

What is even more interesting is the price drop over the last year. It had shot up after last summer's disastrous Russian harvest.

Tamsin said...

And, BP, it is "good honest flour". I've experimented with the stuff that costs half as much again and, although to my mind there is a slight difference in the feel of the dough and the outcome of the final bake, it is not so much better to justify the higher price.

Beyond parody said...

So its just 'good flour' then.

Lady in the Well said...

Clearly it's not a cost effective way to learn to make bread but surely it's more about about being a fun thing to do, where you can meet some like minded people and learn a skill at the same time?

Anonymous said...

You stand a lot better chance of learning a useful skill this way than trying to learn from a book.

It is quite depressing sometimes to glance at the books on your shelf and consider how much you have learnt from them.

Often the answer is: not a lot.

I have a book on breadmaking and after my disasterous mess making I lost confidence and interest waned.

Those who already have a breadmaking mojo might find this rather difficult to understand.

But then, I guess the course is not aimed at them.

Brockley Central Label Cloud