Major Shoreditch scheme to be submitted later this year

After the Shard's completion and Westfield's Croydon plans were reveealed, The Standard reports that another destination directly linked to Brockley is to be redeveloped.

The paper says that a planning application will be made by Hammerson this year for the Shoreditch Goodsyard, which has been vacant for over 40 years. The site surrounds the Shoreditch ELL station, which was built as a concrete box in anticipation that it would be covered by buildings in due course. The plans have been hotly anticipated for some time: 

Permission has been granted for a 50-storey residential tower across Shoreditch High Street at the Principal Place development. Ballymore will build the flats. The plans show “an opportunity for taller buildings” as well as “mid-rise” towers along the High Street frontage. So the detailed planning application is likely to contain three or four fairly tall towers. 

This might sound a bit dense but an open space the size of Trafalgar Square is promised outside the station: the outline plans also show a very large park covering a quarter of the site. But don’t pack your picnic baskets yet: after lying derelict for decades it will likely be another decade before the site is good enough to eat off. 

The site is currently part-occupied by Boxpark.

30 comments:

Osh said...

Woah, that's going to change the area a bit.

Anonymous said...

more rubbish

Anonymous said...

But boxpark is cool!

Brockley Nick said...

Rubbish how?

Anonymous said...

So that's Shoreditch finished as an edgy slightly derelict exciting area.

Anonymous said...

6 storeys is the ideal maximum for residential buildings, as in the centre of Paris.

Anonymous said...

Someone from Shoreditch told me that our organic delis are "passé".

Mb said...

Edgy is nice, I like edgy but derelict as a long term goal is hardly ambitious.

Matt-Z said...

Pedantically speaking the site was formerly Bishopsgate Goods Yard.

Box Park is a bit meh, won't be missed that much.

That part of Shoreditch needs investment, and new buildings going up over and around the station should encourage refurbishment and use of some of the grotty existing surroundings.

Brockley Nick said...

@Matt-Z - yes, but apparently it's now just called "The Goodsyard" (according to the Standard anyway).

Anonymous said...

'slightly derelict' = frayed around the edges, obviously not a long-term goal but something that happens organically and cannot be replicated by a new development 20 storeys high (or more) constructed of steel, glasss, and concrete.

Brockley Nick said...

They are not knocking anything down. It's a completely empty site, except for the station, which is staying, and Boxpark, which was designed to temporarily fill the gap until work began.

Mb said...

Happened organically in that bussinesses closed, weeds grew, walls fell down, water leaked. Part of an areas story just as dramatic wholesale changes and building sure. Much like the origional good yard, it were fields once you know?. Not all incremental change is good, not all dramatic change is bad.

Wilson said...

Not unexpected but how monumentally depressing. Plonking 5 huge towers in the middle of this area will go further into blandifying the area.

I don't see how building pads for various Russians, Arabs and other super rich helps London.

New 'public areas' that seem to be created in these projects are nothing of the sort, they are still private land, and you are only allowed to do what is deemed acceptable on it. So no demonstrations for example and they usually have over officious security, and end up being bland expanses of concrete.

Much like the Shard which is expensive, off-limits and owned by foreign money. These projects are perfect metaphors for modern London.

Brockley Nick said...

@Wilson, you developed an entire critique - both literal and metaphorical - without even seeing the plans. Impressive.

Anonymous said...

Impressive and probably correct.

Anonymous said...

It is the relentless march of the City.

Pretty soon the students and 'artists' will be priced out and the area will be given over to flats for the better paid workaholics of the finance and law business.

I went down Brick Lane the other day and saw an American Diner restaurant with tables reserved for a corporate leaving do for city gents in suits.

How uncool is that?

A portent of a very unhip the future?

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, the City is right next door. Liverpool Street is about 5 mins walk away. This has been earmarked for development as an extension of the City for decades.

I doubt the City will go any further east after this, at least not in the next few decades.

And if the hipsters get priced out, they won't disappear in a puff of smoke, they will reappear somewhere else.

Anonymous said...

Peckham is the new Shoreditch

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, possibly Peckham / New Cross / Deptford.

If I was an aspiring hipster, I'd be putting down roots in Deptford.

Matt-Z said...

People were saying that 20 years ago. Not on blogs though, they hadn't been invented. I suspect they may still be saying it in 20 years time.

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, I know. But just because they were wrong 20 years ago, doesn't mean they are wrong now.

Danja said...

It is a shame one can't preserve a cutting edge in aspic, isn't it.

kolp said...

Genuinely posh areas Hampstead, Richmond etc, don't tolerate this change nonsense!

Anonymous said...

I reckon the hipster groove neighbourhood will go east, Bethnal maybe.

Local DJ event organisers and property speculators and, indeed t' local council have great expectations that impoverished artists will be the vanguard of urban regeneration.

But without the big money engine of the City nearby, there seems little that can sustain the momentum.

Peckam/New Cross/Deptford may get the odd corner generified by hopeful middle classes. The council may install a bit of ersatz Victoriana street furniture and encourage the installation of those ubiquitous brass lamps on shop fronts. But there have been many false dawns in the past and probably more to come.

Anonymous said...

lol @ the thought of anyone seriously contemplating moving to Peckham, New Cross or Deptford! All shitholes off the normal tube network.

Brockley Nick said...

@A1340 - yes, there's a lot of truth in that. Bethnal's got quite a lot going for it. But I don't think Dalston's particularly handy for anything - certainly wasn't before the arrival of the ELL.

kolp said...

Dalston is the definition of edgy; the market, it's derelictitude* juxtaposed with 'temple of the urbane' Geffreye Museum down the road plus you see Paloma Faith catching the overground.

PF is to Dalston what Amy Winehouse was to Camden.


*Derelictitude from the 'Kolpasauraus'- a portmanteau term combining the words Derelict and attitude.

Anonymous said...

I used to work near dalston 30 years ago, it was edgy then, it's not edgy now, it's very tame - Tottenham, if you want a bit of edge head a bit further north . . .

Anonymous said...

Bethnal Green, Whitechapel and Bow etc, we're all hipster joints around 2004-8, they still have enclaves there but rising rents and the pull of Dalston has seen them decline.

Deptford will never become a hipster place as it's too disconnected from Hackney, and the regeneration planned will change the vibe of it anyway. Plus there is precious little decent accommodation round there just estates.

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