Catford Dogs Homes get go ahead

The Mayor of London's office announces:

More than a thousand jobs and 500 new homes will be created in Lewisham through the redevelopment of the former Catford Greyhound Stadium, the Mayor of London Boris Johnson announced today.

The £117m redevelopment will bring 589 new homes to the 4.7 hectare site in the heart of Lewisham under a deal reached between the Mayor and developer Barratt London [the developers of "Renaissance Lewisham" and a client of BC's employers]. When finished, this will include 113 affordable rent properties which will be managed by Gallions Housing Association, 60 shared ownership properties and 416 properties for private ownership.

The publicly owned stadium has been released by the Mayor as part of his drive to unlock development on public sector owned land in order to increase housing supply for hard working Londoners and boost jobs and growth. It is amongst the first tranche of sites released by the Greater London Authority since it became one of the capital’s largest public land owners last year.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: “London’s unbeatable allure means unprecedented demand for housing, and making public land available for development has a big part to play in meeting this. The transformation of Catford Dogs, which for the last decade has been left empty and unused, will not only bring hundreds of new homes to the heart of London, but will feed into the wider regeneration of Catford Town Centre making it an even better place to live and injecting a healthy new dose of jobs and growth into one of the capital’s key opportunity areas.”

The former dog track sits between two key transport hubs, Catford Bridge and Catford railway station, and when complete will also boast 508 sq m of retail space, 298 sq m of community space as well as landscaped links through the site to Ladywell Fields and Catford Town Centre. Work is expected to begin by early 2014 and the project is expected to be complete by 2017.

Alastair Baird, Barratt London Regional Managing Director, added: “'We are delighted to be working with the Mayor on this exciting project.  This is the fifth site we have secured in the capital in the last six months, bringing a total of 1,800 new homes to London.  The site at Catford will add to our already significant presence in the Borough of Lewisham, with our redevelopment of the town centre – Renaissance – which will provide a total of 788 new homes together with a new leisure centre due to open shortly.”

The transformation of Catford Stadium, which has been unused for the last ten years and sits within one of London’s key opportunity areas  and will provide  a major catalyst for future regeneration potential in Catford Town Centre. Lewisham Council have outlined a number of redevelopment opportunities including the redevelopment of Catford Shopping Centre and plans to work with TfL to improve the transport network in the town centre.

Deputy Mayor of Lewisham and Cabinet Member for Regeneration Cllr Alan Smith says: “It is very good news for Catford that this site is finally to be developed. The additional homes and jobs will be very welcome in this part of Lewisham, and the development will sit well alongside our own plans for the rebuilding and improvement of Catford Town Centre.”

Barratt London is among the 25 developers announced last week to sit on the Mayor’s brand new land procurement group, the London Development Panel, which has been set up to accelerate the delivery of housing in London by making it faster, easier and cheaper for public land owners to bring forward land for development.

The former Catford Greyhound Stadium site was transferred to the GLA from the HCA as part of the devolution of power to the Mayor under the Localism Act 2011. The land was acquired by English Partnerships, a predecessor body of the Homes and Communities Agency (HCA), in March 2004 from Network Rail and the National Greyhound Association.

30 comments:

John Huntingdon said...

As long as they leave the sign up

SBKB said...

another reason not to downgrade the hospital - there will be even more patients!

Matt-Z said...

Any mention of safeguarding the route for a DLR extension to Catford? Or will this be another case of building stuff in haste and then regretting it afterwards? (cf the buildings going up in central Lewisham, and the fast-fading opportunity to sort out the bottlenecks and capacity constraints at Lewisham station)

Woodman said...

Probably just nimbyism on my part, but this seems like a terrible idea to me. How is adding to the general overcrowding of the area going to help anyone? It'll make the trains a nightmare and the roads even worse than they are now - as it's contrained on all sides by railways and rivers, presumably access to the site will have to be via Adenmore road somehow?

Peter Thornton said...

What are the thousand jobs? Construction work?

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, presumably, they'll account for the vast majority of those.

Robert said...

Or - you could move to the countryside if you don't like people - it's full of misanthropes there.

Sorry if that sounds a little bit acerbic, but I do find it a depressing tendency amongst some Londoners that living amongst more people is a bad thing. I don't think there is anywhere in London that is particularly overcrowded - and higher density can breed diversity and local economic success.



High concentrations of people in cities is a good thing. It's what makes cities work so well.

Max Calò said...

I hope it's a new design and not the old one. I fear it is though.

Headhunter said...

What do you suggest they do with the land instead? Leave it empty? The problem is that there is incredible pressure on London housing stock at the moment. I've got a couple of friends trying to buy all over south London and things sell in hours and often at over asking price at the moment. Renting is no better - things go very quickly if they're decent. We have the choice of either filling in brownfield sites like this across London with housing, retail etc or leaving them fallow and pushing London further out in to Kent and Surrey over greenfield/green belt land. Unfortunately the hundreds of thousands of people looking for homes in London are not going to go away....

Woodman said...

By all means, put a few houses on there (I'd prefer a park, but that might be a bit optimistic given the number we already have), but squeezing over 500 into that space just seems to be asking for trouble - look at it on a map, there's really not that much space there, which will mean putting up a multi-storey monstrosity. There isn't a housing shortfall in this country, maybe people just need to stop thinking that London is the be all and end all, and go and live somewhere else rather than just be shoe-horned into places where there really isn't room for them.

anon said...

Will this speed up the Bakerloo line through Peckham rye - nunhead - brockley - lewisham - catford? ;-)

Woodman said...

Even the most positive of us in London likes to have a grumble every now and then that public transport is rubbish, that the roads are rubbish, that crime levels are too high, that service levels are rubbish that care levels are rubbish. Not one of those things will be improved by adding more people to the mix.
It's nothing to do with not liking people - it's about realising that if the existing infrastructure is creaking under the weight of the current population, then that needs to be addressed before you bring in more people.

Robert said...

Sure - but you are making the wrong equation.
Cities function, because high densities of people living closely to each other create economic opportunities that are not available to those living in rural areas. From economies of scale to niche and specialist goods and services.


Of course, there is a point where high density becomes serious overcrowding, and that presents other problems - but in theory, more people in an area should create more services - not the other way round. Of course, there are other factors involved, and it doesn't help that we have a government that is indoctrinated with an anti-public service agenda.

Max Calò said...

Years ago in the original submission the fact that it's basically a cul de sac giving on a perpetually congested main road was justified with the argument that the traffic there is already as bad as it can be and any worsening would therefore not be perceivable.Looking on the bright side it's an argument for inproving public transports and bringing the DLR as well but in fact the redevelopment of Catford should be centred on a completely revamped traffic layout to decongest the area, only that the Council is now ditching that plan.

Peter Thornton said...

So only very temporary - I hate that sleight of hand.

Max Calò said...

I think the proposed DLR route is on the other side of the track, slicing off a bit of Ladywell Fields where the Cafe is now and going on on a straight line from there alongside Doggett Road and ending before the Catford Tavern.

Brockley Nick said...

To be fair to the Mayor, it's pretty standard to talk about short-term jobs in this way (you might say Full Time Equivalent if you were being careful). The building programme will be 2-3 years, I guess, and will create jobs through the supply chain. How many jobs of any sort are truly permanent?

Headhunter said...

I'm sure a lot of people would love to move out of London and work elsewhere but the unfortunate fact is that London is the core economic driver in the UK and many companies and therefore jobs are based here. Personally I'd love to live in Bath maybe, Bristol.. Cambridge but it simply isn't an option, my work sector means that I am destined to be in London... The government needs to do more to motivate employers to base themselves outside London in empty northern cities like Liverpool and Sheffield where you can buy a house for 50p... Perhaps HS2 will help if the NIMBYs don't put a stop to it...

Peter Thornton said...

Of course no job is ever a certainty - but with construction work we know that most of these jobs will not be new at all. Barratt most likely sub contracts much of this work and many if not most of these people will already be in work with Barratt and its contractors.
When Jaguar creates 1000 new jobs, these will be 1000 people who were previously unemployed.

Ez said...

Wrong. Builders and subcontractors don't retain labour if there is no work. New homes = new jobs = lower rents and prices = more disposable income = better economy. IF the designs are reasonable, there is little not to like here.

rogejetski said...

Why bother putting retail in the development when there are empty shops 500m away.

Max Calò said...

To buy milk.

Ladywell Fields said...

Er, how does Catford fall within Greater Brockley??? Some geographical confusion on your part Nick? Or another example of expansionist tendencies perhaps?

NAT said...

Lebnsraum?

terrencetrentderby said...

Once Nick takes care of the Polish

NAT said...

This blog site can't thrive without a Mr. Nasty, previous candidates need not apply.

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41yearshere said...

Robert, You're so Steven Johnson (Chapters One and Two)! You're right , but Woodman is right in observing that the transport links and other facilities have to keep up with an expanding population. Otherwise people get cross. Then they riot. It happens.
41yearshere

Robert said...

Ha. Let them riot. It's good to let off steam. And then the government can do what it's supposed to do and provide the services we need to make cities thrive.

I have no idea who Steven Johnson is by the way - excuse my ignorance.

Laura Harvey said...

I see the development is going to be called 'Ladywell village'. Its seems rather confusing particularly as its not in ladywell village

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