Campaign to kill speed on Wickham Road

Residents in Wickham Road have launched a petition to reduce speeds along Wickham Road. The group, supported by the Brockley Society and the Green Party, are calling for new measures to calm traffic, after the resurfacing work last year made it easier for cars to travel at speed down the 20 mph road.

The campaign follows a recent crash at the junction of Wickham Road and Geoffrey Road, in which a woman had to be cut from her car. Campaigner Anthony says:

We're not asking for speed humps but for the council to seriously address the dangers & environmental effects of greater traffic with increased speed, especially over the last year - in any way appropriate.


There was a crash involving a police car & a female driver (whose car needed the roof removing to get to her.) The police told me that they both ended up in intensive care. The incident took place at the roundabout at Geoffrey Road & Wickham Road. Drivers have complained about not realising it was a junction.

Where there is a 20 mph restriction, the street layout must by law be able to enforce it. This is not happening & we are recommending the council implement measures, whatever are best, to reduce traffic speed.

26 comments:

Crofty said...

Speaking of speed, has anyone else noticed a new craze that seems to have started a couple of months ago, of teen boys flying along the pavement on bikes at maximum full-pelt speed, weaving in and out of pedestrians? Brockley Road seems to be where it happens most. Absolutely heart-stopping as you can't hear them coming from behind you, and they then rocket past just inches from you - if you'd happened to step aside a bit just before to avoid bin, shrub etc you'd be dead. Terrifying for anyone but must be hideous for elderly people or those with young children.

Tim Arnold WEA said...

Every day I hear drivers leaning on their horns and tyres screeching at the junction of Wickham and Harefield Roads. Other frightening junctions include Wickham-Geoffrey and Tressillian-Harefield - particularly if you're a cyclist.

Brockley Nick said...

No, I've not seen that.

Dannys1234 said...

In all honesty what does this have to do with a petition to stop vehicles speeding along a 20mph residential road?

Orijimal said...

Signed. Gotta say i was pretty shocked to learn it was a 20 zone, it's always felt like a free for all. I live on the corner of Wickham/Harefield and that end of the road is like a dual-carriageway in the morning and evenings, drivers tearing down there before they get to the speedbumps nearer Lewisham Way. They just snake round the ineffectual little bumps up this end.

Woodman said...

We have speed bumps all the way along Manwood Rd, and a 20 limit, and it makes no difference - we still get idiots driving like it's a race track. Arguably the speed bumps make it more dangerous for pedestrians as they mean that cars are quite often on the wrong side of the road as they try to avoid them.

Crofty said...

Um, perhaps topic of speed and consequent danger on local streets?

Dannys1234 said...

Pavement cycling, whether the danger posed is real or perceived, is wrong no doubt. But maybe you should ask why people feel they have to cycle on the pavement? Maybe this is a direct reaction to the danger that the roads pose (real or perceived) to themselves? The danger of speed and consequent danger posed by speeding vehicles on 20mph residential roads far outweighs that of the new 'craze' of pavement cyclist that you mention. I have signed the petition, it would be great if you also did so, it's in the interest of all road users and pedestrians.

RCH said...

Yep, have to say I agree. Having recently moved I haven't been around there for a couple of months. But I'm in a similar situation now. I now live on Ravensbourne Park (which in turn leads into Manwood Road) and this is a 20 mph zone. I've driven down there at 20mph so I know just how slow that actually is, and the 284 is no way doing 20mph as my house vibrates each time it goes past. Plus, every time I slow down to turn into my drive, some idiot tries to undertake me when I pull into the middle of the road, even though I'm indicating left.

channelzeroprose said...

While living on Wickham with a little'un for years, around 4 years back I started a FB group page for exactly this but unfortunately no one bothered to join up. They added in the width restrictors shortly afterwards but they didn't - and haven't - made any difference to the speeding issue.

channelzeroprose said...

p.s: they may also want to address the issue of every other car (I wish I was exaggerating) that speeds down there - having skunk smoke pouring from the windows...

Brockley Newbie said...

Also the cars speed up between the speed bumps so you get to enjoy the noise of the acceleration and the heavy breaking. People drive on the wrong side of the road to avoid the bumps or even overtake people doing the speed limit.
The bus speeds on the road and numerous times I've seen police cars and vans doing far more than 20mph without their lights on.
Unfortunately it's an attitude problem with the drivers involved.

Liam Healy said...

Signed. Could do with one of these for Malpas Road too.

Jonathon Broughton said...

Two options.

1) Enforce Speed limits by roaming spot checks and punitive fining. Per neighbourhood this ends up being very effective in speed reduction longer term.

2) Install traffic calming (read Speed bumps). This is done by councils as it is cheap. It isn't especially effective and contributes to wear and tear of vehicles and the road surface.

Speed > Heavy Brake > Speed > Heavy Brake and so on.


Local Authorities opt for the latter as it is quick and compliant with legislation. Doesn't mean it is any good though. Pads are even less effective at reducing speed but are better for cyclists and marginally better for vehicle-longevity.

SafetyFirst said...

As I recollect, there was a plan to impose a 20mph speed limit across the whole of London. Yes, here it is:

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/london-could-see-20mph-speed-limit-on-nearly-all-residential-streets-by-2020-8648655.html

CB said...

Yes, it's ridiculous along RP / MWR...dangerous

RCH said...

I'm not a huge fan of speed cameras and speed bumps as they only serve to slow down traffic at one particular point, and the small bumps you find on Manwood Road, Wickham Road, Chudleigh Road, Hilly Fields Crescent are pointless as you just straddle them and they do nothing to slow anyone down.

However, average speed cameras are a very effective way of making sure people stick to a speed limit over and entire road. This would be a little tricky to implement on roads such as Manwood Road and ravensbourne park because of the amount of turnings. However, you could install it going from the mini roundabout on Wickham road to the turning at Cranfield Road. That'll soon stop them.

Woman of Brockley said...

Why don't cyclists use bells to warn pedestrians that they're coming up fast behind them? I see it on Hilly Fields too. If they don't care about pedestrians, they might perhaps contemplate how much damage they'd cause themselves and their bikes in a collision.

Headhunter said...

20mph limits are an utter waste of time in reality unless they are enforced by police or better yet, enforced through speed humps, road narrowing etc. I have cycled in and around Lewisham for years now and am often travelling at about 20mph and most of the time cars are flying past me or trying to squeeze round me where the traffic islands are... Speed humps help a bit I think but as others have pointed out, a lot of people just accelerate/brake/accelerate/brake etc etc.


The broken speed humps which don't cover the width of the road can be scary - a number of times I've had oncoming vehicles swerve into my path as I ride towards them, simply so they don't have to go over the mini hump - ie when I'm further into the middle of the road passing parked cars etc, cars swerve across to my side of the road simply so they don't have to go over the bump. They are bloody dangerous.

GoSlowJo said...

Less we forget Elliott Forde.

We need all the measures by the council and a tougher approach by the law.
Not the soft touch approach to law breakers, who can sometimes choose between.

A) Points on license
or
B) A fine and a speed awareness course.

Brockley is a built up area, there is absolutely no excuse for reckless and dangerous driving. It's getting worse and we really don't want anymore accidents or fatalities. Surely Brockley could lead the way on this for Lewisham and beyond.

I agree with the previously mentioned ideas, but think we can go further and probably even further still.

1) Enforce Speed limits by roaming spot checks and punitive fining.
2) Install traffic calming measures
3) Use fixed cameras as a deterrent and to support prosecutions.
4) Use mobile apps to report dangerous drivers and to support prosecutions.

Anon said...

Re speed humps the council received funding to put humps in place. Like inconsiderate cyclists on the pavement, many motorists choose to accelerate between humps or go at full pelt and fly over the humps.

Cars should be fitted with electronic speed limiters, then signals would be transmitted restricting their speed to that areas speed limit.
Bycycles should be be built with a unique electronic ident device inside the frame, this would allow the police & smartphone users to ID criminals on bikes.

Winston Smith said...

Ah, but what if the bike/car is being borrowed/stolen by someone else?

Time to implant the population with radio tags so they can also be identified by a police drone at a potential crime scene: dodgy parking, sudden bump-avoiding manoeuvres, cycling on the pavement and other vexatious crime?

A brave new world.

The Youth of Today said...

Sounds like fun, thanks for the tip.

hairdryer said...

Yep, they do it on my road as well. Very crummy motorbikes - my hairdryer has more power and still makes less noise. They have tuned the bikes right up to squeal.

hairdryer said...

Oh, you mean push bikes - i was talking about motorbikes....

Headhunter said...

I think the costs of enforcing something like this would be prohibitive. It may be possible in cars and motor vehicles - they can be checked as part of the MOT but trying to enforce something like that in all bicycles - where would you start? Half the population has a bike kicking around at the back of a garage or shed that gets used twice a year, how would those get checked? What about kids on bikes? The size of the task would cost billions of quid to implement and enforce! You can get transmitter type security devices to track bikes but to make it law that they should be fitted would be impossible...

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