Canada Water and the Old Kent Road targeted for intense development

The Mayor of London is currently consulting on proposed alterations to The London Plan - including creating new "opportunity areas" in Bromley, Old Oak Common, Harrow & Wealdstone and most significantly for us, Canada Water and the Old Kent Road.

The LP is a high-level blueprint for the future of our city. It's the reason why new office developments are increasingly clustered around main rail stations and why inner London brownfield sites have been targeted for high-density development.

"Opportunity Area" designation would mean intense and accelerated development at these locations. In the case of the OKR, the Mayor envisages a minimum of 2,500 new homes and 1,000 new jobs being located here. For Canada Water it means at least another 800 new homes and a huge new King's College campus.

The OKR designation would lend further weight to the case for a Bakerloo Line extension, which is being touted around by the Mayor, but remains unfunded. For a weeping sore like the OKR to be turned in to a residential area will require something dramatic to happen, like running the Bakerloo Line east from Elephant and Castle straight down its length, before going on to New Cross, Lewisham and Ladywell or perhaps Peckham.

The Mayor is expected to trail his infrastructure strategy in the coming weeks and publish it in the Autumn. That strategy will set out what investment is required for London to grow its population to 10 million.

17 comments:

Broca said...

Those poor escalators at Canada Water . . .

Gill said...

It's sad to have witnessed the decline of OKR over the last 30 years. It used to be throbbing with nightlife in all those great pubs that have now disappeared - World Turned Upside Down, Green Man, Dun Cow, Frog and Nightgown. Fond memories of attempting to get into them aged 17 when they were all over 21s only, failed miserably.

Emma said...

Having looked at the London transport plan it mentions the Bakerloo line southern extension but for post 2022 and is not funded at all. So it's definitely a long way off but Is there something we can do to try and make it more likely to happen? With the local elections happening this year should we be asking the people up for election what action plan and influence they have to try and ensure this extension happens?

Monkeyboy said...

It will be a TfL deliverable, the chairman of which is the mayor. If you want to lobby it would probably best be done through your GLA councilor. And post 2022 is a long way post

maisie_moo said...

Yes, there's definitely a case for a third escalator! Don't know why they didn't build one in the first place.

Nm said...

My journey to work isn't complete without the inevitable stampede of African women racing to get onto the escalator first.

Headhunter said...

Lack of foresight... When they built Canada Water it was a minor station in the middle of nowhere. Canary Wharf was a fairly minor place, the East London Line was a line to nowhere. Probably about 5 people per hour used the escalators whereas now it's about 500+.... Shoulda, coulda, woulda....

Dave said...

how do you know they're African as opposed to some other nationality ?

LdnSE4 said...

Hate to be pessimistic, but I do not think the Bakerloo Line extension will ever happen. The extension, in its many various forms, has been talked about since the 1940s! But TfL and the government hate SE London.


As with HS2 and Crossrail 2, just build them already!

Brockley Nick said...

The crush at the top of Canada Water knows no colour, creed or gender. Everyone's stampeding. Nm, I think you have a problem.

Brockley Nick said...

This time it's different. In previous decades, inner London has been hollowing out and SE London was poor. Now, inner London is filling up, and the only place government and TfL officials can afford to live is SE London.

Tim said...

I wonder if a new bridge over the Thames around Woolwich will ever get built?

Tim said...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-22437305


This is the last piece of news I could see on the topic. Apparently consultations are underway again. Then I read about Darren Johnson saying something along the lines of "a bridge is all well and good, but we need sustainable forms of transport".


I wonder whether the Greens are opposed to cars if there is a secular trend towards electric or hydrogen engines. Does this not weaken the anti car argument, and surely this trend is inevitable?


(At the end of the day, I don't really care - just want a bridge).

Emma said...

It's not just cars that want to cross the river. It would be nice to also have more options for pedestrians to be able to cross the river and I'm sure cyclists would like that as well as I believe they aren't allowed in some of the tunnels.


I use the foot tunnel at Greenwich about 3 times a week and have always thought it's a shame there's not a foot tunnel between Canary Wharf and the O2 arena. With all the development happening now at the Royal Docks and the proposals for Canada Water I'm sure there will be more demand for people want to walk or cycle locally. I certainly would rather walk than get on public transport for just a couple of stops.

tik said...

Electric/hydrogen cars still won't solve congestion. London is going to have to get to grips with sustainable/active transport sooner or later. Doing it now would avoid doing it the hard way when population growth pushes road/infrastructure capacity past tipping point (which you could argue has already happened - it's hard to see how London could possibly handle any more cars).

Tim said...

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/the-car-is-no-longer-king-of-londons-roads-6450391.html


Car use is declining. Partly driven by eCommerce, partly by other factors. I would welcome heavier taxation to get it down more (money to be spent on proper cycling and other infrastructure).


But I still want a bridge.

terrencetrentderby said...

*sucks teeth at Nm* That's my seat!

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