The Brockley Hyperloop

Citymetric has had a crack at developing a detailed map of the proposed new orbital railway, which would make use of the Brockley Station high level platform. This is their informed guess, based on existing rail infrastructure and the unhelpfully vague map provided by TfL. They admit it could be wrong, although the stuff immediately around Brockley is almost certainly correct. 

A direct train link to Lewisham, Blackheath, Nunhead, Peckham and Dulwich would be a massive result - not terribly useful for work, but great for play.

13 comments:

DT said...

I really can't see this happening in our lifetimes. Planning will be difficult and it's expensive.

Just look at how long they had taken to get Crossrail and Thameslink building. Nonetheless, I support platforms for the Victoria > Dartford services at Brockley.

John Bingham-Hall said...

By the time (if) this gets realised places like Barking, Croydon, Lewisham, Bromley will surely have become huge employment centres, as part of a Great Re-Inversion with both business and living distributing more intensively across the whole metropolitan region. It's an amazing rethinking of the traditional hub and spoke city model focused around travel times from the centre.

R said...

What this needs - I'm feeling optimistic today - is another loop inbetween the Waddon and Nunhead ones.


So a junction at Brockley with the East London line extension and then the National Rail (currently Southern) service from London B to London Victoria showing - the one that goes through Crystal Palace, West Norwood etc.

Brockley Nick said...

I don't know how old you are, but I imagine it will be delivered piecemeal and eventually joined up, just like the Overground network was. Thus, we should start to see bits and pieces come into operation within your lifetime.

Albert said...

OK - will it happen at a point in our lifetimes where we'll be able to use a train unsupervised?

Headhunter said...

Love this map... Brockley right the centre of the "Greater Brockley" Empire which now extends right across London! Unbridled megalomania!

futurama said...

I always imagined that the great commute into work to the great anthills in the city might eventually go out of fashion as the Internet and smart phones enable mobile/home/part time/ working. However, the recession seems to be the thing that has given work patterns a good shove away from the daily grind of commuting. I wonder if the transport authorities model these sort of changes in behaviour and take it into account when coming up with their grand designs. Linking up the suburbs is a start.



London may yet become a more liveable city.

terrencetrentderby said...

If the East India Company could run their empire from a small office on Leadenhall Street then Brockley Nick shouldn't have too much trouble with his Macbook in Browns

Brockley Nick said...

Home working might be growing in popularity, but jobs in London are getting more centralised in London, not less http://brockleycentral.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/the-great-inversion.html

Brockley Nick said...

Substitute Macbook for beaten up PC and you've nailed it

terrencetrentderby said...

You could afford a Macbook if you didn't go to Browns

Jeremy of Geoffrey Road said...

That's true, I recently had to pawn my iPad for an artisan bun

Brockley Nick said...

Maybe in a few decades. No evidence of that at the moment. See recent Economist article about relative decline of places like Reading (West London's answer to Croydon)

http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21608763-londons-great-suction-machine-affects-south-too-glass-half-empty

"The high-skilled vacancies are increasingly advertised in central London. A growing cluster of telecoms firms is taking root near Paddington station. Vodafone put its headquarters there in 2009, moving 200 executives from its offices in Newbury, a town in West Berkshire. Nokia followed in 2011, shifting staff from Farnborough.

"Executives based in London can more easily meet investors in Canary Wharf or the City, as well as advertising firms, consultants and the like. Adrian Griffiths, a businessman from Swindon, says the town where he is based has everything he needs for his plastic recycling start-up, except for finance: “There are no angel investors here, not one. So two to three days a week I have to go to London.”

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