Sainsbury's to open at Lewisham Renaissance

Yet another new supermarket story. Sainsbury's is moving in to the ground floor of Lewisham Renaissance, the residential development on Loampit Vale that begins at the swimming pool and ends at the railway bridge.

As the development nears completion, it has secured its first anchor tenant, which will be going head-to-head with the Asda directly opposite, in Thurston Central (no relation).

59 comments:

Crofty said...

That last bracketed bit made me grin like an idiot!

just a local said...

Can't remember seeing Sainsburys on those vinyls.....

alex heidi said...

Such exciting news another frigging tedious sainsburys with its over priced average food for the lewisham housing revolution!

Guest said...

Why not a Lidl convenience store?


I really wish Lidl would get their act together and open up a local shop in at least one of these seemingly never ending new local developments. That would be something we genuinely all could get behind!

Neilgadhok said...

Bit disappointed Waitrose hasn't taken the plunge but maybe we're a few years off that yet

Brockley Nick said...

Nope, sorry. I don't like feeling like I'm going to prison when I buy my groceries. Tescos are depressing environments, but Lidls take it to a new level.

snoop said...

like prison? how would you know... ?!


seriously nick, 'renaissance road' amenities aside, your snobbery is outdated and misplaced. its not frugality, its the combination of quality and value that take people to these stores and that's why they are right up there with waitrose as the favourite supermarkets in the uk

Brockley Nick said...

Wotevs. I don't like them and I'm not going to pretend I do, just to fit in with the zeitgeist. It's not snobbery, it's personal preference.


I avoid all supermarkets as much as possible. Internet deliveries were one of the best things that ever happened to my quality of life.

terrencetrentderby said...

The Lidl and Aldi Christmas adverts were nauseating. Especially the Lidl one which appeared to star the whole of Broc Soc (or similar types) amazed at how cheap the cava and pigs in blankets were.

Saying that you will cut your food bill in half, which leaves more money for drugs and shoes.

snoop said...

shopping (of any description, internet, aldi or farmers market) will never be in my top 10 things to do in my spare time.

anonymous said...

Nick, is your issue with Aldi and Lidl or with the people that shop there? Either way sounds like snobbery to me. Aldi and Lidl are a fantastic edition to the supermarket industry. And they sell quality fruit, veg and meat at great prices. I bought a 100% British free range chicken for 4.99 last week and it was damn tasty. Meanwhile sainsburys charge at least 7 quid for the same thing. And i'm pretty sure sainsbury's and tesco aren't passing that difference price on to the farmers.

Brockley Nick said...

Of course it's not with the people - how ridiculous.


No, if I must go to the supermarket then I like a bit of effort put into the presentation, a decent range to choose from and products I instantly recognise, so I can get in and out in the quickest time possible. I have never bought a chicken of any sort ever, so that doesn't change my mind.


I understand other people have alternative preferences, but it doesn't make me a snob to say that the whole of Lewisham would be united in delight about the prospect of a Lidl. There is a Lidl in Lewisham anyway, if you so desire. It's on Lee High Road - a fun day out for all!

Monkeyboy said...

“I’ve never bought a chicken - ever” That sort of revelation would sink Ed Miliband

anonymous said...

It sounds like you're a marketers dream. Just because you recognise a brand it doesn't mean it's better than the other. I also don't go to a supermarket to be impressed by the colour of the interior or amount of natural light that comes in. As you say the aim of the game is to be in and out in the quickest time possible so why would it matter that much? But they're really not as bad you describe anyway.


Lidl and Aldi sell really good quality food at ultra competitive prices - isn't that what really matters? Another one of the reasons that Lidl and Aldi are doing so well is precisely because they don't confuse the customer with a vast range of brands for the same product.


Without wanting to burst the online shopping bubble but did you know that online shoppers always get the fruit, veg and meat that has the shortest expiration date?

Brockley Nick said...

"Lidl and Aldi sell really good quality food at ultra competitive prices - isn't that what really matters?"


a) It sounds like you're the marketer's dream - swallowing that proposition as fact. b) No, it isn't all that matters. I value my time and I don't like spending time in Lidl.

testing said...

" I bought a 100% British free range chicken for 4.99 last week and it was damn tasty"


But that is too cheap, someone has to pay so it will be the minimum they can get away with to call it free range, extremely short growing times and farmers paid an unsustainable amount for the produce they make.


As a whole we pay lots to eat out, very little on ingredients but still complain about the later, sometimes with reason, basic housing costs are too high.


I would pay more and go to a good butcher, it's not snobbery it's just fairer for everyone including the animals

Headhunter said...

Waitrose took the plung with its "Greenwich" branch which is basically in Deptford. It opened a year or 2 ago.... I think that Central Lewisham would be a step too far for them. In the meantime you can walk/bus/cycle/drive to the one in Deptford/Greenwich...

Headhunter said...

I would agree with that. When I have shopped at LIDL or Aldi I have found the quality to be good enough and the prices to be competitive and for me that's mostly what matters. I couldn't care less about recognisable brands, the colour scheme and the overall "shopping experience". As long as they stock what I want, it's clean and the queues at the tills aren't ridiculously long, I'm don't care much

Dannys1234 said...

As already mentioned, somewhere someone will be losing out with the production of such cheap food. It's a race to the bottom in terms of sustainable farming practices and nutritional quality in supermarket food. But sod it 'cos cheap is best right?

terrencetrentderby said...

The demographic Shangri-La Waitrose need is not far off comrade.

Brockley Nick said...

It's funny, the people dismissing shopping "experience" are - I strongly suspect - the people who want us to shop local and independent - which is all about trading value for theatre.

Brockley Nick said...

Who was that to?

Mark Racz said...

The LIDL/ALDI approach is mainly a Central/Eastern European one; their "70s'" design, (partial) choice of products etc. are of continental inspiration (you know, east of Paris). For me it's funny and sort of nostalgic to have it so close to Brockley (Catford store), but I do realize that it's borderline barbaric for a British (I assume) Waitrose-centric shopper (who hates shopping).

anonymous said...

how so is that I'm swallowing that proposition as a fact? I'm basing my shopping decisions on first hand experience of going into the store and buying the stuff based on what I can see with my two eyes. I'm not basing my purchases on recognisable brands and some advert telling me to buy it.


Anyway, I'm not here to tell you where to shop or how to shop. But there is nothing wrong with Lidl and Aldi. They are selling a good product at good prices. Hence why they have been so successful in the last couple of years.

anonymous said...

The person who is losing out is you. £4.99 is probably too cheap for a free range chicken but if you think that Sainsbury's, Tesco's, Waitrose, and the others pass on the extra cost of their chickens on to the farmers then I'm afraid you're deluded or maybe just a little naive.

anonymous69 said...

I love it!! Where else can you buy good fruit and veg, fresh meat, grass fertiliser, a ladder, steel-toed work boots, an angle grinder, flowers, plants, a bicycle repair stand, paddling pool, golf trolley, meerkat ornaments all under the one roof. Can't get enough of it.

testing said...

If you think that your local good butcher doesn't pay more to the farmer than the supermarket then you aren't really thinking and you certainly haven't looked into it.

Brockley Nick said...

I agree, there is nothing wrong with them. Different strokes for different folks.


"I'm not here to tell you where to shop or how to shop" - good. Because yesterday you were calling me a snob for having a different set of preferences to your own.

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, that's basically it.

PVP said...

Shop at Lidl due to combination of prices and quality, basically value for money. It works for me as do not require 18 types of rice krispies to choose from. My favourite random item found was a trombone, really wish I had bought it.

anonymous said...

"testing" - I'm talking about the big chain supermarkets, not the local butcher. I know the local butchers get a raw deal and try to use them when I can. I regularly buy my meat from Well Beloved in Deptford which does really good quality meat at decent prices. But I do get slightly wound up when you get the likes of Flock and Herd in Peckham and Moen's in Clapham who try to coax you into paying 15 quid for a chicken so you can be part of a "shopping experience" as Nick puts it.

anonymous said...

Haha!!

Monkeyboy said...

"100% british" as opposed to one with a serbian father?

Guest said...

I think we're avoiding the facts here.


If a Lidl convenience store, a la Kentish Town, were to open in say the new development opposite Brockley Station, what would be the downside? There's a Sainsburys over the other side of the tracks so it wouldn't restrict choice, and in a convenient location like that there would indeed be plenty of natural light.


After that it surely just comes down to price, and I think the allure of 25p chilled bottles of water, and decent red wine for £3.69 etc would be too much even for Nick to resist.


As mentioned, the big supermarkets put ridiculous margins on their food, 60% on vegetables I'm told, so I'd hope that their colour schemes are decent - problem is, even Lidl are catching up with that now.

anonymous said...

100% British wasn't meant to sound like some UKIP tag line. It was meant to highlight the fact that the chicken was raised and grown locally in the UK where it hasn't travelled thousands of miles to get to my plate. Whether the chicken or the farmer has serbian parents doesn't really bother me.

NAT said...

If you're on the lookout for a suitcase, a watermellon, and a chain for a fobwatch and you don't mind if they're under a roof, then Deptford market!

Monkeyboy said...

Sorry, i was being a smart arse. its what i do.

Jay Rayner pretty much nails my thoughts on food production/retail/snobery
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Greedy-Man-Hungry-World-everything/dp/0007237596

His chapter on the quest for the perfect chicken is amusing.

anonymous said...

Nick, you always love having the last word but not sure I can let you do that on this occasion. I was only referring to your comment that going to Lidl and Aldi is like going to a prison. I'm sure I'm not the only person who thinks that sounds slightly snobby and also more than a tad harsh.

Brockley Nick said...

Uhuh. If you're now taking that back and saying "vive le difference" then I am happy to leave the last word to you.

Dannys1234 said...

Cheers for that, I don't think i'm loosing out nor am I deluded or naive. Don't think I said other supermarkets were any different, did I?

anonymous said...

See there you go again - you can't help yourself. in the meantime I'm off to Aldi's. PVP, I'll let you know if those Trombones are back in stock. And Nick I'll find out if they have plans to deliver in the near future.

Dannys1234 said...

Think it got posted (page jump maybe?) to the wrong thread. Should have gone to 'testing' in the one below.

Dannys1234 said...

Shopping locally or independently is not about trading price for experience (unless you're a fool), it could be about supporting local economies, more sustainable production, better quality, convenience of being able to walk/bike, or perhaps many other personal reasons - to suggest it's a simple trade-off between price and experience is far too simplistic.

Brockley Nick said...

"to suggest it's a simple trade-off between price and experience is far too simplistic."


Yes, it is too simplistic of course. But it's also too simplistic to say that independent is axiomatically better for local economies, sustainable production, quality or convenience. Anyway, that's another argument for another day and one that's been had on here many times in the past.

Brockley Nick said...

And there you go again. Etc.

testing said...

I use well beloved too, good guys. Don't buy chicken though (not a fan) so only really know beef prices, Ginger pig isn't much difference so tend to go with one of those two.


Grew up in farming area so I'm not keen on any supermarkets. Certainly wouldn't align myself with any "I'm a (insert chain name) shopper" type thing, no club points for me.

Dannys1234 said...

Had to look up 'axiomatically'. I said it 'could be'. There's quite a difference according to the dictionary! I get your point though.

Mark Racz said...

oh, and as being cool for shopping at cheaper places, that's a classic conservative tactic, dissing austerity as a poverty chic lifestyle option of the privileged. Or can you point me to Brockley freelance web designers who shop at Aldi as opposed to raiding Delicatessen and the Deli? (perfectly decent places, by the way, in their own right).


you were term-dropping "Zeitgeist" at some point, do survey how many LIDL/ALDI shoppers are familiar with it and if their shopping patterns are based on ironic-yet-authentic self-indulgence.

Headhunter said...

I definitely shop at Brockley Market most weeks but only for the odd luxury. I like the fresh fish stall (if I'm not heading to FC Soper in Nunhead) or the Jacob's Ladder meat stall. Then there's the coffee stall - fantastic.


I admit that it's a good experience and preferable to shopping at LIDL (or Sainsbury's) but my main reason for shopping at Brockley Market (or any local shop) is not the "experience" it's because I perceive that I can get much better quality meat and fish from the stalls there than in a supermarket.


I'm willing to pay more for quality but would rather not pay more for "experience"....

Brockley Nick said...

To be clear, I recognise that supermarkets and deep discounters (not confined to Lidl and Aldi) play a vital role in helping keep the cost of living down for people, many of whom struggle simply to make ends meet. Their rapid growth coincided with a period of prolonged austerity and economic recession and that's not a coincidence.I have often argued in favour of supermarkets and deep discounters with people who think they are the devil.


But it is also true that many of us define ourselves by how and where we shop (which is why there are so many comments on this thread) and that for some, Aldi and Lidl are cool because:


a) they are disruptors, shaking up the establishment big four
b) they are German, and a certain type of left-wing, middle-class person loves to bang on about the superiority of the German economic model
c) they are unashamedly cheap and no-frills. So when you say "I shop at Lidl" you are making a statement about yourself - just as you are when you say "I shop at Waitrose". They are both coded statements - similar to saying "I read The Guardian" or "I read the Telegraph".


The most vocal advocates of Lidl and Aldi tend not to be people who "need" to shop there.

anonymous said...

The plain and simple truth is that Aldi and Lidl do some foods really well at really good prices so I buy them. Sainsburys do other things really well so I buy them. Waitrose do other things well so i go an buy them. The local butcher sells other things I like so I buy them. etc....


Maybe a lot of people are just better and smarter shoppers than you are and you can't understand it because you buy all your food online? Maybe you're just a bit out of touch with the market.

anonymous said...

So who do you think are losing out? And don't say the farmer as I think we both agree that the farmer loses out the same whether you buy your chicken from Aldi/Lidl or Sainsburys/Tesco's etc...

Dannys1234 said...

We lost a long time ago my friend.

reg said...

Being a smart arse is not your forte Monkeyboy, but keep at it, you might make a breakthrough sometime in the future

snoop said...

is this the political thread rehashed through the medium of shopping preferences? i shop at aldi, waitrose, the markets (deptford and lewisham), local independents, and the M&S by cutty sark. i never shop by internet. i expect that defines me as something unprintable in nick's book, so bring on the postal voting.

anonymous said...

Last words should go to snoop on this one. Well said Snoop!

tinkerbell said...

Annnnnd now you've just stopped them having the last word. Nice one doofus.

hardlianotion said...

Heh, postal voting - early and often.

catford saint said...

Come to Catford; we have Aldi, Lid and a genuine 1970s grot Tesco .
This is coded statement meaning I wish I lived in Beckenham

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