General Election 2015 - the Lewisham Deptford candidates

On the eve of the general election, here is the list of candidates for the Lewisham Deptford constituency. Pro-tip: If you want to know what the corresponding candidates in neighbouring constituencies are all about, simply swap their names in to the list below.

This election, the unifying theme is housing. Proposed solutions differ, but everyone is promising the same thing - more affordable homes. Here are the ten to choose from - how will you be voting?

Bim Afolami, Conservative Party

Standing on local job creation (a red-herring when we are on the doorstep of Europe's best jobs market), enterprise and the prospect of a Bakerloo Line extension. Plus housing, natch.

Philip Badger, Democratic Reform Party

Badger wants better local democracy. See here for his campaign article.

Michael Bukola, Liberal Democrats

Full marks for a campaign platform that stands out from a samey crowd. While everyone else focuses on health and housing, Bukola has added reform of stop and search powers and drug laws to the mix and stands on his party's record in government (albeit mostly in terms of how they've held back the worst excesses of the Tories).

John Coughlin, Green Party

Brockley councillor and lone-opposition to Labour in Lewisham Council. Like the rest of his party, he's regrettably relegated environmental stuff to the lower reaches of his list of pledges and instead focuses on the living wage, rent controls and the nationalisation of utilities and the railways.

Massimo Dimambro, UK Independence Party

UKIP tanked in the local and European elections, so they're back with a candidate with a foreign-sounding name and a benign list of priorities that doesn't mention Europe or immigration once. He's even put the need for a cinema in Lewisham top of his wish list - what kind of monster could disagree with him?

Chris Flood, Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition

An experienced local politician, formerly with the Socialist Party, Chris is standing on anti-austerity platform and vehemently opposes local schools becoming Academies. Read about his priorities in this interview with Bob From Brockley.

Vicky Foxcroft, Labour Party

The red-hot favourite to be our next MP. To Vicky's credit, she's not taking it for granted (unlike her predecessor). Housing is what she's always been passionate about while health and childcare feature prominently in her stuff. Hopefully, as an elected MP, she'll venture more ideas and opinions than she has to date. For now, she plays a very straight bat.

David Neil Thomas Harvey, Independent

A single-issue candidate who wants a "none of the above" to appear on ballot papers.

Malcom Martin, Christian People's Alliance

CPA's list of pledges includes unspecific commitments to social justice and very specific commitments on social issues like abortion and marriage.

Helen Mercer, Lewisham People Before Profit

As ever, LPBP have picked a potent mix of issues to focus on (housing, the NHS and privatisation) and are able to field an experienced local campaigner.

21 comments:

anon said...

Would be nice if it felt like we had a choice! Labour guaranteed

JS said...

Well we all had the chance to reform the electoral system a few years back, but the vested interests in Red and Blue managed to persuade us we should keep a system where 5% of the electorate in swing seats determine who is in government - and your vote tomorrow is next to pointless. And they wonder why people are apathetic...

Woman of Brockley said...

I have felt completely disengaged from this election because my vote will make no difference to the overall outcome at all. Dispiriting really.

brockleyJim said...

i disagree that votes don't matter in this election. they matter more than ever. the bigger the disparity between a) percentage of overall vote and b) percentage of seats won the harder it is to ignore that reform is needed. if the Greens, Plaid, UKIP, SNP etc win negligible percentages and 1 or 2 seats, the argument is that reform wouldn't change much. if those parties can all win a significant vote tally but still only win 1 or 2 seats then it keeps the pressure on to keep reform at the top of the agenda. also, if we can get more than a handful of green or other seats and they have a part to play in a coalition then it is they who will push the agenda for reform - not the bigger parties.

a small turn out will provoke an entirely different debate, the bigger parties will lead the media into reporting that the problem is that they are not engaging with the electorate and the solution is to learn how to better engage with the electorate. i.e. more spin and business ass usual

a massive turn out with big numbers voting against the big parties says something different. it says "we are engaged, we are listening, we heard what you had to say and we are telling you to F off".



Even in a dead cert labour (or con) seat, boosting the number of voters against the incumbent and reducing the margin of victory makes a difference.
or you can not bother and suggest you are making a point. thing is no one is listening to your point. Brand made that point months ago and it has been roundly booed offstage since.


vote for someone. simple.

Green member said...

The Greens expanding their offer beyond just environmentalism is sensible and has resulted in wider support and increased membership (I am a GP member).

Headhunter said...

I feel the same way. Lab could front a monkey and people round here would vote for it... I'll probably vote green again anyway...

Brockley Nick said...

I understand why they have done it. But air quality in London is a huge issue and where I would hope they would take the lead and set the agenda. I don't really care what they think about economics, I do want them to campaign on a genuine quailty of life issue that affects us all. I suppose it all comes down to whether you think they will ever become a significant political force in national politics (I don't).

Woman of Brockley said...

I didn't say I wasn't going to vote! I always vote. I regard it as my civic duty. If necessary, I go for the least awful option available.

JS said...

I completely agree Jim and my last post was carelessly worded. I would encourage everyone to vote - for precisely the reasons you outline. However, I do fear that the power-brokers (the two established parties, the media) will continue to ignore the manifestly undemocratic status quo - irrespective of the disparity between votes cast and seats won.

I know there is no perfect system - and AV was a poor compromise - but it was better than the present situation where, protest votes aside, your vote tomorrow will count for nothing.

I would urge those that want their voice to be heard to consider joining the Electoral Reform Society: http://www.electoral-reform.org.uk/

Newby said...

Having the Greens anywhere near a coalition would be horric. Whilst the FPTP system has many floors one of its main advantages is that it prevents extremists like the Greens, BNP etc from entering parliament? As an aside the reason the parties you mention do not receive representation is that they receive a tiny amount of the vote (aside from the SNP and maybe UKIP this year) and this wouldnt change in a PR system since I assume there would be a hurdle rate a party would have to clear to receive any MPs?

Headhunter said...

Personally I don't see a hope in hell in anything beyond Labour so I'd like to send a message that there are votes in green policies either on a national or local level...

sotty said...

I will be voting with my heart. My favoured candidate from the list won't get through but it will send a small message.

Andy Scorgie said...

I always vote - my dad fought and was badly injured in WW2 for my right so to do! the sad fact remains that our constituency will return a Labour MP regardless.

Lep Recorn said...

I'm Irish - so I am voting green of course!

terrencetrentderby said...

May not be such a plum seat given the anti local-Labour rhetoric. Greens might be the tactical
choice if you want a change to the current crap, or at least rattle them and make them feel a lot less cosy and safe..

Andy Scorgie said...

What on earth has that twerp Coogan got to do with and election in this constituency - god forbid the idiot lives in the manor!

Woman of Brockley said...

Who's mentioned Coogan?

Kriss said...

I used @VoteSwap to trade my vote with a Green voter in Hove - a Tory/Labour marginal. So I'm happily voting Green tomorrow - and Ben in Hove is voting Labour to try and reduce the Tory 3.8% majority. Hope my vote counts.
Still time to swap if you're quick!

NAT said...

The Greens were in government in Ireland wern't they .How did that go exactly?

Voter said...

I've voted Conservative for a fairer, more straightforward and prosperous Brockley

Alex Margolies said...

I think you might've mixed up your parties there...

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