Ladywell Baths: The Movie


The Lewisham Buildings Preservation Trust write:

Ladywell Baths comes back to life in this short film by local filmmaker, David Stock, in collaboration with Lewisham Buildings Preservation Trust.

Historic, grade II listed building, Ladywell Baths, and the recollections of people who have passed through its doors over the past century, will be commemorated in a new, short film, “Memories of Ladywell Baths”, to be shown at Curzon Goldsmiths on 8th July 2018.

Local film-maker, David Stock, in collaboration with charity, Lewisham Building Preservation Trust, has produced a short film which uncovers and documents the stories of people who have lived, worked and played in this iconic building, now known as Ladywell Playtower.

Built in 1884, Ladywell Baths became one of the first public swimming pools in the country. It attracted thousands of local people, including athlete Eric Liddell, whose gold medal win in the 400m at the 1924 Olympic Games inspired the film Chariots of Fire. In 2004 Ladywell Playtower was closed, and following a serious fire in 2006, the Victorian building fell into disrepair.

In 2017, after many years of campaigning by local residents and Lewisham Building Preservation Trust to bring the derelict building back into use, Lewisham Council put proposals for its restoration out to tender. In November 2017, the Council made the decision to award the redevelopment of the building to Curzon Cinema in conjunction with developers Guildmore.

From dance parties to boxing rings, midnight swims and floods, not to mention a few ghostly tales. Hear stories of this iconic building from those who were there.

The film will be followed by a Q&A with the director, David Stock, and some of the film participants.

Sun 8 Jul 2018, 2:00PM

Tickets £5.00 + booking fee of 8.5%

https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/event/FIEIJG

Curzon Goldsmiths
Richard Hoggart Building,
Lewisham Way
London
SE14 6NW

Lewisham-led schools: Primary good, Secondary bad

Lewisham Council-run primaries have squeaked into the top 20 best-performing schools in England at Key Stage Two, in a new research produced by the Education Policy Institute.

The independent research group found that Lewisham's schools were among the country's best once factors including prior attainment of pupils and levels of disadvantage were taken into account. The top 20 is dominated by London schools. Lewisham is ranked 20th.

That's the good news, but Lewisham's biggest challenge is of course its secondary school provision, and at that level, the performance is poor, with our Council-run schools ranked 177th out of 218 providers. The Harris Federation, which runs a number of local schools was ranked second in the country at Key Stage Two and fifth at Key Stage Four.

For the full report click here. Thanks to Ian Duffy for the tip off.

Brockley Streets

Let's Push Things Forward: The Streets exists to fight this kind of abuse
Brockley Streets is a new community campaign group dedicated to improving local roads for pedestrians and cyclists.

By encouraging better road design and re-routing traffic, The Streets want to stop cars prangin' out or squeezing down roads that don't fit but they know it. They say:

We want to create positive change for the benefit of all residents and visitors to Brockley by
increasing road safety for everybody inside and around the Brockley Conservation Area.

We want to give priority to cyclists, pedestrians and public transport, reduce pollution from traffic going through the area and prevent the use of our streets as rat-runs by non-local traffic.

We are not about the CPZ and we do not represent any particular view for or against (people have asked us this question in the past).

There is a London-wide initiative by TFL and the Mayor of London called 'Healthy Streets' designed to help communities improve local traffic issues and we would like to help shape these developments in Brockley.

To find out more, visit their website and to get actively involved, email them here.

Coulgate Pop

Browns of Brockley has a spiffy new Peter Max-style pop-art makeover, painted over tts black canvas.

BrocSoc slams Ashby Mews changes

The tarmac-covered north end
Following the installation of a gate across the north end of Ashby Mews, some residents have now decided to tarmac the surface, changing its historic character to something which more closely resembles a business park.
The southern end of Ashby Mews is untouched
The gates, which we were initially promised would be left open for pedestrians, are now permanently locked to anyone but residents. As a result of this action, the Brockley Society, which exists to protect the heritage of the Brockley Conservation Area, has issued the following statement:

Brockley Society is aware of the installation of gates at the northern end of Ashby Mews and has advised initiating mews residents (frontagers) that:

  • a retrospective planning application is needed
  • otherwise LB Lewisham will start enforcement action as the gate is too high
  • even though the Mews is privately owned, all mews frontagers along the whole length should have been consulted and a management strategy should have been agreed to ensure free access is maintained for pedestrians as well as delivery and emergency vehicles

Despite this advice being given to the organising mews residents it seems to have fallen on deaf ears as they have now had the mews access lane resurfaced early this week with black tarmacadam at the northern end.

As this destroys the rural character that is such a unique characteristic of the Conservation Area (CA), the Society has escalated its concern via Ward Councillors so as to extend the request to LB Lewisham:

  • for enforcement to be investigated or
  • to require that planning consent be obtained to stop this 'suburbanisation' threat

On this Brockley Society considers that:

  • the resurfacing work fundamentally affects the status of this part of the CA such that it could be withdrawn
  • other more suitable traditional solutions should have been considered via the Society to avoid this possibility
  • as the work is defined as 'a hard surface' within the curtilage frontage of each property bordering the affected area then the Article 4 Direction protecting the CA should fully apply and the planning applications already granted/in consideration for bordering properties should be reappraised in view of this ill-considered change
In contrast to original reassurances, the pedestrian gate is now locked

Lewishanimals

Lewisham is London's second-most pet-friendly borough.

An analysis of home-rental data on Zoopla by Fasthomes.org found that Lewisham had a higher proportion of pet-friendly ads than any borough except Kensington & Chelsea.

As rental rates increase across London, pet-friendliness becomes a more important issue.

With thanks to BCer Chris Wheal, who is friendly to pets.

Brockley Central Label Cloud