Brockley Christmas Market, December 13th


Des from the Brockley Cross Action Group (BXAG) has written regarding the Christmas Market. He says:

"The final pieces of the jigsaw have been fitted and the Brockley Christmas Market is now a reality.

"It was very much touch and go for several weeks when we were told that we could not use Coulgate St as Network Rail contractors would be closing the street from the beginning of December. Other possible options were explored and eliminated, but a last minute change of plan means that the construction work is now delayed until January and we have the "green light" for the market.

"Last year's was good (about 1700 people attended), this year will be better. We are providing more stalls and live music throughout the afternoon culminating in a 'Switch on of the Brockley lights by actor Patrick Baladi [Neil from The Office and former flatmate of a friend of BC's] and a festive choir in front of the Brockley Barge.

"John Stainer School are working with the BXAG and will be providing part of the live music (a band composed of teachers & parents) and we have incorporated plenty of interest for children including lantern making and Santa and his elves in the grotto."

Des doesn't add whether the controversial "green" Father Christmas suit will return.

48 comments:

drakefell debaser said...

'band composed of teachers & parents'

The organisers had best make sure its strictly traditional. No sitars or other foreign instruments please.

I am looking forward to it as I missed last years one.

Monkeyboy said...

Ohhhhhh so that's Patrick Baladi. Bodies was an excellent series, it was on a a stupid hour so didn't get a wide audience. Was one of my must watches, wouldn't recommend it if you are an expectant parent or have had a bad obstetric experience.

Not proper Brockley said...

This is going to be great. I went to last year's and bought my whole family some ethically sourced coat hangers and a whole bag of fair trade cous cous. It was quite the Christmas party...

Not proper Brockley said...

"No sitars or other foreign instruments please."

Yes, just guitars (Arabic/Indian via Rome and Spain), pianos (Persia via Italy), trumpets (Egypt, Scandanavia and China [presumably independently]). Or maybe a flute (German), violin (Mongolian) or a saxophone (Belgian).

Don't want to listen to any of that filthy foreign muck...

Not proper Brockley said...

ps...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:English_musical_instruments

Anonymous said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:English_musical_instruments

Monkeyboy said...

Not Proper Brockley....you've not been on here long have you? I think you'll find that DB was aiming that comment at our resident xenophobe who whined last year about the lack of 'proper' traditional british content at the market and complained about the summer fayre having a steel band.

Anonymous said...

For a newbie he or she's certainly picked up the hilarious 'mung bean eating/ethically sourced/organic/Guardian reading Brockleyites' gags quickly.
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

drakefell debaser said...

yeah sorry I couldn't resist. Not Proper Brockley, I am not fussed what gets played.

Interesting contribution to musical instruments by the English then, Not sure what jingle bells to bag pipes would sound like, but I bet it's difficult to play.

Anonymous said...

Hopefully Paddy B will be wowing us with his John Travolta moves, before flicking the switch ;-)

Anonymous said...

Patrick Baladi from The Office is turning on the Christmas lights in Brockley? Is this a case of life imitating art? That is so, so crap it could have been in an episode of the Office itself. Hilarious.

Anonymous said...

As I pointed out in Suggest a Topic, he does actually live here, so not that pathetic!

Tressilliana said...

Excuse me, DD, I'd like an opportunity to take offence here! The English did not invent bagpipes, nor are they associated with England. According to Wikipedia, the Hittites might have been amongst the first people to invent bagpipes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagpipes

but nowadays they're most closely associated with Scotland, surely?

Monkeyboy said...

Christ, the thought that anyone would consciously invent something that sounds like a skinhead kicking a small dog is beyond me.

Perhaps it was invented as a Hittite joke that went too far?

Tressilliana said...

You're part-Italian, aren't you, MB? Your lot have them too, in that case:

http://larkinthemorning.com/product.asp?pn=BAG104&bhcd2=1227953707

I love the sound of the pipes. We often visit my parents at the time of the annual Highland Games for the area, which starts with four pipe bands processing to the ground, all playing different tunes at the same time. Stirs the blood!

nobbly brick said...

"Sir" Steve Bullock is opening the Ladywell Xmas market - he seems like more of a Bromley resident to me...

ho ho ho

fred vest said...

i used to play the bagpipes

nobbly brick said...

meeting gentlemen in a public lavatory is not 'playing the bagpipes' Fred...

fred vest said...

oh yes it is

nobbly brick said...

I stand corrected

Paddyom said...

Fantastic - well done on securing a big actor to switch on the lights - i am dead impressed!

Not proper Brockley said...

when properly 'wrastled' the pipes can be a beautiful sounding ache. There are english, scots, Irish (and probably Welsh) pipes. As far as i'm aware the english pipes are a Northumbrian traditional instrument and are used in the makings of such classics as 'The Lampton Worm'. Hell of a tune...

Not proper Brockley said...

ps. you don't have to have read ay of this site (although I have) to make jokes about the Guardian reading, mung bean eating, ethically sourcing, cous cous demolishing Brockleyites. You just need to have lived here for a while. When will the council demolish the Broca in favour of a small gaming arcade or pool hall? Not soon enough

mintness said...

Wheesht, lads, had yer gobs, I'll tell yous aal an awful story...

I always thought it was the Lambton Worm myself, but the word-of-mouth principle of traditional song still held sway in my Geordie primary school days, so I wouldn't want to be too assertive.

As for pipes, guts and the like, you can't beat a Macedonian gajda (disappointingly unrelated to the heemasexualist hook-up site of a similar name). Not content with polluting its fledgling country's World Music scene, the instrument's atonal sounds even find its way into their bloody Eurovision songs. If only I had the skill to fashion one from a cow's stomach and a roll of organic Sellotape - for that is practically all it takes - I'd sign up for a Christmas market stall right now.

Not proper Brockley said...

I'll defer to your first hand geordie experience. I only heard the song off my mum when i was a kid, and on a tape with no inlay!

lb said...

I agree the gajda's brilliant, as are those Italian bagpipes that need two people to play them.

drakefell debaser said...

Tressilliana, sorry I didn’t mean to cause offense. The bagpipes I was referring to were the ones mentioned in the previous Wikipedia link on the English version.

I bought a set of bagpipes on my first visit to Edinburgh thinking they would make a good souvenir but once I got them home and saw the ‘Made in China’ tag I felt a little cheated as the only thing Scottish was the chap who sold them. I should have bought more whiskey.

Anonymous said...

Great to see the Xmas market back.
By the way I reckon Coulgate Street would be a great place for a regular market.
Would it not be a good idea for the Telegraph Hill farmers market to be based on Coulgate street instead?
It would be bound to have more custom and would encourage trade in nearby shops too. Worth considering in these credit crunch times.
Brockley Jim

lb said...

[dd] To avoid offending even more Scots people, I'll tactfully point out that "whiskey" is generally made in Ireland. It's "whisky" you're thinking of (and very nice it is too).

Tressilliana said...

DD, I've been following this website for about six months now and causing offence seems to be a large part of its raison d'etre! I'm not that touchy (for a Scot, anyway).

drakefell debaser said...

Oops I didn’t realise there are different spellings. Learn something new every day. I enjoy whiskey and whisky as well as Bourbon. Have you tried Albannach in Trafalgar Square LB? Great selection of whisky but you need to forget about the state of the economy before going in else you will just drink water. Worth it though.

lb said...

Oh yes, well worth a look.

And speaking of water, a splash of it will do a good malt no harm (and make it go further too).

By the way if you want to try the Irish stuff I recommend something called "Redbreast" if you can find it.

drakefell debaser said...

‘Would it not be a good idea for the Telegraph Hill farmers market to be based on Coulgate street instead?’

Now why would that be a good idea? Is it because that additional 10 minutes walk means you have to cross the tracks? You really do not like the darkside do you Brockley Jim?

Besides it wouldn’t be Telegraph Hill Farmers Market if it moved and not everything can be shifted around for your convenience.

fred vest said...

a splash of water does wonders for a good malt in my opinion, really opens up and releases the flavours

drakefell debaser said...

LB, you get a little jug of water to go with your drink in the Albannach. It does make the drink last longer and softens it a little.

I shall try and find a bottle of Redbreast and give it a go.

Anonymous said...

I actually live closer to the 'dark side' and Telegraph Hill than Coulgate Street but I always thought it strange that Lewisham farmers markets were in the parks and not on the streets.
Brockley Jim

All the World said...

NICE AND SIMPLE: Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Direct from the finca (farm) in Andalucia, Spain.

Buy as much or as little as you want (Supply your own bottle).

1/4 litre = £4
1/2 litre = £8
1 litre = £16

Tel: 077 6668 7759

drakefell debaser said...

Fair enough Brockley Jim, I am just getting a little bored of the habitual slagging off of West Brockley, Darkside, Mordor or what ever else people refer to it as so I thought you were just having another go.

Is it not easier in terms of planning or health and safety to have it in a park rather than a street? I dont know but most things seem to hinge on these two issues and most farmers markets do tend to be in a green space.

Telegraph Hill Tamsin said...

Er, thank you Brockley Jim, but it is quite nice for those who live in Telegraph Hill to have the Farmers Market in the Telegraph Hill Park! Not as many people use it as we would hope, but those who do would probably not trog all the way over to Coulgate Street with their children and back again with their children and shopping. Currently people shop there and then visit the playclub with their kids for a bit of a run around.

Tamsin said...

Drakefell, never try to buy whiskey in Scotland.
Scotch Whisky
Irish Whiskey
from the gaelic "water of life" in both cases.
(Sorry - just seen others have beat me to in in correcting you!)

Headhunter said...

And Bourbon? Whisky or whiskey?

Anonymous said...

Definition of a gentleman - someone who can play the bagpipes. But doesn't.

LetsbyAvenue said...

Definition of a gentleman: someone who can play the bagpipes - but doesn't.

Tressillian James said...

Bourbon - is Whiskey

Headhunter said...

I suppose that's logical with the Irish influence in the US...

Anonymous said...

No Green Santa this year, in a highly controversial move the Santa was black!

Monkeyboy said...

Don't say that! Cat still thinks he's real - he'll be sulking.

By the way, there were boy scouts packing bags at Sainsbury's (for charidy mate!)

The thing is they did look a lot like adults. Do you think they screen recruits to make sure they are actually kids? I'm phoning the Daily Mail pronto.

Anonymous said...

It is of course possible that he could be real and black

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