Brockley MAX 2009

The Brockley MAX arts festival will be back this summer, this time with a new blend.

The Tea Leaf Art team will be working with former organiser Moira Tait to organise the 2009 Brockley MAX.

When Moira stood down after the 2007 festival, a new team took over and did a creditable job, given relatively little time or resource, but it's great to have Moira's experience back on board, together with the team that has successfully got Brockley's community art gallery back up and running.

Most of all, it's great to have the Brockley MAX's future secured for 2009.

You can read an interview with Moira about the MAX here.

We're also happy to bring you some photos from the Brockley gallery launch, courtesy of team member Sian, who adds a gentle reminder that:

"If people have not yet bought their Christmas cards, we have a wide selection by local artists in the gallery, prints from £15 and original artwork starting from £30 ranging up to £5900. Opening hours are now in the tea-leaf-arts.com website, but are Thursday - Saturday 10am - 6pm and Sundays 11am - 5pm."


26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank the Lord about Moira's return

Tamsin said...

But due acknowledgement to the others who took over last year and still managed to get something respectable together despite being appallingly let down by the programme printers.
They worked their socks off and were having to wing it up a very steep learning curve (to hideously mangle my cliches).

Brockley Nick said...

@Tamsin - absolutely agreed.

T said...

and split my infinitve.

Anonymous said...

Hurrah!
Brockley Jim

Anonymous said...

I will support Tea leaf arts as best as I can, but I worry about it's long term future. They really do need help, look at the website. The impression that it gives...

drakefell debaser said...

Wonderful news.

I disagree with the criticism of the Tea Leaf website though. What impression is it giving? I think it’s functional, tidy and it works and I am sure there will be improvements to it once funds and time allow. I get the impression that there will also be an online shop to buy art which will expose the artists to a wider audience and bring in far more revenue than it could without it. This will help in its long term success.

It will take a little time but I think given the problems faced of getting a gallery space to open there in the first place, it has come on in leaps and bounds so far.

patrick1971 said...

Nothing wrong with the split infinitive! Don't get me started on "should of", though... :-)

Anonymous said...

The impression that it gives is of a newly formed organisation that needs help. That is not so much criticism as it is a realistic assessment of the situation.

Yes they have done remarkably well to get things set up having been dealt a dodgy hand. However time is of the essence as they only have 2 years in the building rent free.

They need to get their income streams flowing, E-commerce is obviously the way.

It's nice to see pictures of the opening event and about the struggles they had getting open how about some images of the things for sale. Or introduction to the artists who are part of the collective. Right now Tea -Leaf arts is personality free.

The Cat Man said...

I havn't actually been yet - the pictures suggest it was a busy day for the opening and that clearly has to be a good thing.

Anonymous said...

Prints from fifteen quid? I am so digging this, I'll be down there this weekend for a browse.

drakefell debaser said...

I see what you mean anon. Having write ups on the artists exhibiting there would work well and perhaps give an insight to the art itself. Good idea.

The prints on sale there are fantastic – Van Gogh in a party hat blowing one of those extendable whistle things (can’t remember what they are called) as well as the Mona Lisa with driving goggles on entitled High Speed Mona.

Anonymous said...

Is a print quite literally something printed out?

drakefell debaser said...

Pretty much, you then get them framed as you wish. They are good quality though, sealed with a card backing and what looks like an original signature of the artist – Leo Stevenson.

If only I had the Benjamin’s for his Canary Wharf painting.

max said...

Normally for a print one intends something that has been printed out of a plate that was the original hand made artwork and as the plate wears out after a limited number of prints then prints are numbered and those with lower numbers are more faithful to the original plate than those with higher numbers, although the wearing out can give a nice look.

nobbly brick said...

Like max says, (although the material that the original plate has been made from has a bearing on this) but a print can also be a screenprint, lithographic print, photographic print, linocut, woodcut (or potato print) etc. All these are 'artistic' prints and the skill of printing is integral to the 'value' (not necessarily commercial) of the print.

You might also see things labeled as 'Giclée' printing, but these are essentially inkjet prints and although they may please you to look at, the 'craft' aspect of the production is lower.

Pesto said...

I must get down there, whilst there may be a rent free period, the gallery still has other running costs it has to cover.

The Gallery's opening times are

Thursday: 10:00 - 18:00
Friday: 10:00 - 18.00
Saturday: 10:00 - 18:00
Sunday: 11:00 - 17:00

106 Endwell Road,

The Cat Man said...

Is it not open Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday?

The efficiency of the 'rent free' period has been halved - you would never see a commercial enterprise do that!

State the obvious said...

Yes but it's not a Commercial Enterprise ......yet

Slate the obvious said...

I guess the point is that they'd be significantly more "commercial" if they made the best use of that rent free period and actually opened during those days.

Mung economics.

drakefell debaser said...

They could be Giclee prints then - on the back of the card it says the following:

This print has been made using the finest archival paper by Lyson or Permajet, manufacturers of acid free photographic and ink jet papers for professional photographers and discriminating artists.

Then it goes on to say it shouldn't fade for 45 years under normal circumstances and should be treated with respect.

nobbly brick said...

yes DD - archival printing techniques are still relatively basic for inkjets - so best to keep a print so that full sunlight (at least) doesn't shine on it.

I suppose you also have to assume that the image has gone through some kind of digital process and/or manipulation. Personally I haven't come across anything reproduced in this manner as 'art' because it lacks the craft, not that the lack of craft aspect precludes it being 'art'...

But people probably said the same thing about Andy Wharhol - it's just a personal preference/prejudice.

I suppose that an inkjet print is not the primary source of the expression either, which might be something to do with it.

Paddyom said...

Fair play to you all for working on both the brilliant BMAX festival and the excellent Tea Leaf Arts space. So many people in this area are an absolute credit to the area and deserve a huge thanks from the lazier Brock residents, like myself ;)

Anonymous said...

How much of a learning curve does an events promotion company need to run a festival?

Tamsin said...

Were they events promotion company people who took over? I thought they were real ordinary Brockley-ites who stepped in at short notice.
And a local festival on almost zero budget where you are co-ordinating idiosyncratic volunteers is a very different animal to events normally promoted by events promotion companies where it is just a matter of throwing money at externally sourced acts and activities.

Brockley Kate said...

I thought the gallery was supposed to be open today? I wandered past at lunchtime and it didn't look open - the shutters were down.

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