Young, Dumb and Living Off Mum - Broc-watch

Bruce Dickinson: Guess what? I got a fever! And the only prescription.. is more cowbell!
Gene Frenkle: Thank you, Bruce. But I think if... I think if I just leave... and maybe I'll come back later, and we can lay down the cowbell. [ starts to leave the studio ]
Bruce Dickinson: Aw, come on, baby..
Eric Bloom: Gene, wait! Why don't you lay down that cowbell right now. With us. Together.

- Behind the Music: Blue Oyster Cult

Young, dumb and living off mum - the Brockley-set reality show - debuted tonight and was searingly accurate.

Brockley is portrayed as a sun-drenched paradise, handy for Shad Thames - a place where a night in the pub results in meeting "amazing people." The Tesco Metro on Lewisham Way was the only Brockley institution to feature.

The show is on a par with Wife Swap - that may or may not constitute a recommendation for you - but it could definitely do with more Brockley.

109 comments:

Anonymous said...

Could only bare 30 mins of the awful people on this show. Truly terrible.

Anonymous said...

That house was amazing.

I blame the parents!
I felt so sorry for those kids, honestly.
it isn't their fault.
Their parents should be ashamed of themselves.
How can a child get to age 23 and not know how to turn on the hob?

If you are given everything you ever ask for, never have to do any chores or work for anything yourself - of course you will turn out to be a selfish, ignorant, hoo-ha!

tyrwhitt ali said...

I only saw a few minutes but it was the amazement with which they greated the ability of someone to produce hot water which amused me!

4x4 said...

@Anon-"I blame the parents"-perhapps if they had gone to boarding school that would have donew them some good. You learn to stand on your own two feet without parents getting in the way. I would recommend it. You certainly learn how to fend for yourself and it is character building.

Anonymous said...

you went to boarding school 4x4?

drakefell debaser said...

10 out of 10 for cringe factor.

I am surprised the parents didn’t ask to remain anonymous or have their faces pixellated. How anyone can fail at being a parent on such a grand scale is beyond me particularly Dogan’s (what kind of name is that?) mother who is busy raising the type of person often referred to as a c*nt. If only she had used contraception.

As for Nicola and her 23 jobs, forget going to bed early just get the razor blades out.

Thank god for Robert Webb but I don’t think I can watch it again.

Anonymous said...

4x4 - I'll take your word for it.

Personally I think parents should raise their children - not nannies or nurseries or teachers or boarding schools.

Headhunter said...

Oh damn, I missed it. Is it on again? Is it a series or just 1 programme?

Anonymous said...

it's a series of 6, but you honestly will despair for the world after watching it.

Headhunter said...

Sounds really bad! When is the next episode on?

Anonymous said...

next Sunday I presume, BBC 3 at 9pm. It will be on iplayer if you want to torture yourself early

Gobsmacked said...

Hmm, we watched this last night - I think OMFG is an appropriate sentiment. I mean seriously??? I could cook a full roast dinner by the age of 9 and these people are utterly mystified by where hot water comes from and don't know how to turn on a hob!

Not enough Brockley - I was hoping they might at least go to the pub at Jam Circus or something but they went to the Amersham Arms - still, Robert Webb does great commentary although sometimes it isn't even needed... for example my personal favourite quote "What did you learn?" "I learned to slice bread"

Anonymous said...

Here it is for anyone who missed it
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00lt4t7/Young_Dumb_and_Living_off_Mum_Episode_1/

Maybe the inhabitants will end up staying in Brockley and there could be a follow-up: "Young, Dumb and Living off Mung"

Brockley Nick said...

That is very funny - the first ever funny "mung" joke. Worthy of a LOL.

Anonymous said...

No it's not Nick, please try and contain yourself.

The Cat Man said...

This sounds really great! Looking forward to watching it. Glad the iplayer link is up there, that was going to be my request - I do not even know If get BBC3 via. the TV.

Anonymous said...

It's The Apprentice meets Big Brother, isn't it?

I feel sorry for the kids to some extent - molly-coddling has left some of them with no self-confidence whatsoever, so that they crumble at the first sniff of adversity. There are already glimmers of self-awareness, though, and I actually started to warm to one or two of them.

It certainly puts the Apprentice candidates in perspective though, doesn't it? The very worst of them starts to look highly competent beside this lot.

Anonymous said...

4x4 grew up in boarding school, regards jeremy clarckson as an intellectual and thinks a night in a strip club is a good night out. I think there may be some abandonment issues there.

Anonymous said...

nice house.

were there any references to Brockley or se4? I couldn't bear to watch more than the first 10 mins....

Tom said...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2009/jul/18/charlie-brooker-scree-burn

Brockley Jon said...

What road is the house (that's apparently really old, cold and haunted) on? Looks like a fairly busy one, Wickham I'm guessing? Hot Lewisham Way Tesco action is at around 7:30 for those who care.

The Cat Man said...

I'm going to watch this tonight - sounds great!

Anonymous said...

Looked like a Wickham Mung Mansion to me.

tyrwhitt ali said...

I know they were walking along Wickham Road when trying to find someone to tell them where their boiler was. Saw the sign in the back of the shot.

uncle heckle said...

Oh no that's bad. Mung Mansion?

Don't give up the day job will you.

The Cat Man said...

I wonder if any of these youngsters actually know what a mung bean is?

Anonymous said...

Yeah, Orion or whatever his name was.

fabhat said...

Oh yes it's Wickham Rd alright. While filming was going on we had the joy of seeing the screaming and diva'ing on a daily basis. All I can say having seen the programme, is that I was suprised that seemed even more repellent when you heard them speak, and what a good thing it is that the house they were staying in is detached...

4x4 said...

@anon-Yes I am pleased to say I did go to boarding school and yes a strip club is a good night out if you like that sort of thing.
Clarkeson an intellectual?
Not sure if he is but he presents a very popular television show and has a column in the Sunday Times. Like him or loathe him,he's done okay for himself-did he go to boarding school?
Parents bringing up kids themselves?
Depends on the parents surely?
The staff at my school had extensive experience of educating and preparing children for the years ahead and have more experience of doing so than first time parents. The school was a great support network but you soon learned how to learn to stand on your own two feet. you would learn to be accountable for your action and to have a responsibility to the rest of your peer group. Manners and consideration for others were also high on the agenda although I have to admit I do fall from grace on all to regular an occasion.
Being molly coddled by ones parents is no way to be brought up.

Anonymous said...

Could I then ask a further question regarding your boarding school, were you sent there because your parents wanted out of the way, or were they perhaps abroad for some reason and so it was the best choice for you?

Sorry to be intrusive but I feel a reason is relevant.

sonofagun said...

Maybe they should come to the quiz at the Wickham on Tuesday

fred vest said...

"Could only bare 30 mins of the awful people on this show. Truly terrible."

to be fair, this statement could be applied to about 95% of all telly these days

Richard said...

When asked if they could be filmed coming to Jam Circus and maybe asking for part-time work I now understand why the lady on the phone said not to feel bad telling them no, she knew they were "dumb" (I haven't seen it, quotation marks are only fair until I have)!

4x4 said...

@anon-my parents were abroad but perhaps they would have sent me anyway. I wanted to go as most of the other children I knew were also going to boarding school. Maybe I would have wanted to go to a local school if all of my friends had been going there. I guess its what you're exposed to. There are good boarding schools and bad ones, just as there are good and bad state schools. Some kids in state schools would love boarding school and some would hate it. For me and many others, it was excellent. One thing is for sure though, the kids at my old school weren't half as feckless as those on tv last night.

be nice said...

Anon, @ 1738, what a rude and silly question to put to 4/4.

Most of my friends were sent to boarding school because their parents felt it provided the best education for them and were prepared to pay a lot of money to get it. That's their prerogative.

When you write unnecessarily antagonistic postings, you do your own upbringing - whatever it was and I have no idea - a disservice.

4x4 said...

@be nice-no offence was taken from anon's comment. I am sure my parents thought I would get a better education at boarding school and would have probably thought I would enjoy it more.
I wonder how many parents would send their children to boarding school if they had the funds?
If your child is under achieving, I can't think of a better place.

drakefell debaser said...

Agree, I boarded for 6 years and loved it and if I happen to have a son one day I would want him to go to the same school.

Anonymous said...

"unnecessarily antagonistic postings"

don't be ridiculous, I asked 4x4 in as innocuous a way as possible, but I only have a secondary modern background - perhaps I should have phrased it differently.

I think 4x4 is interesting and wanted to know a little more about him - he was generous in his answer.

My background is about as far from boarding schools as is possible - I went to the school around the corner, and living in Bristol, we went to the coast for our holidays - Severn Beach - and stayed in a corrugated iron shack (this is true, but I can see were it's leading...)

4x4 said...

@anon-do you think you would you have liked to have gone to boarding school if your circumstances were different or a public school if not boarding?

Sofia said...

Just watched the first episode on iPlayer. What a depressing show. I can't decide who's more immature, the kids or the parents. Pathetic.

Anonymous said...

well, many of the friends that I have now had far 'better' education than I had and although my parents urged me to apply for 'better' schools in Bristol I was ambivalent (about schools in general). That said I left, at 16, with enough 'O' levels to get by with, and indeed, after clearing my head of school I applied to art college and eventually ended up at one of the best in the country (at that time) - where, inevitably, I wasted my time and was awarded with a BA at the end of it... so I must have done something partly right there.

(Note to Nick - 'abstract art' actually, but I woukd have preferred to paint dogs)

We sent our son to a fee paying school - one of the reasons for doing that (for me) was that I didn't want him to go to a poor school like the one I went to. As it turns out it was pretty bad anyway.

Regardless of my education, and being largely self-taught in virtually everything I do, I normally manage to have an above middle 5 figure taxable income (self employed) for doing something that, if you asked me what I did, I'd say, 'well, this and that you know'.

In short, I suspect my education was as good as yours. No disrespect intended.

I went to a strip club in a pub once as well (near the entrance to the Blackwall tunnel, the pub that is, not a lewd comment on the act)

Monkeyboy said...

An iron shack! We would have LOVED to stay in a iron shack. We had to stay in a bin. We we're poor but BY GOD we were miserable.

"There are good boarding schools and bad ones, just as there are good and bad state schools." For a change I agree with you 4x4. I would have hated boarding school but went to a great secondry school. You can't really make any broad judgements based on a blog like this though.

I think we can all agree that the twerps on the show are just a particular type of annoying teenager. Get those across the social spectrum. They could do with a slapping.

Anonymous said...

yeah yeah, thanks MB...

Monkeyboy said...

Never let an obvious joke go begging, that's what Bob Monkhouse taught me.

4x4 said...

@monkeyboy-"I would have hated boarding school"-how can you be so sure?
I couldn't be certain I would have hated state school-might be a bit more streetwise now.

Monkeyboy said...

Well I actually quite liked being at home when I was a child. Weird but true.

I loved my smother...sorry I mean mother... and am not a wimp as far as I can tell.

The Cat Man said...

ah, you big girl

Bea said...

I went to boarding school (which was not accademic at all but turned out "nice" roman catolic girls). The reason: my parents moved every two to three years (usually abroad) because of my Dad's job.

I so agree with 4x4 that you learn to stand on your own feet very early on and since we had home economics I learnt how to turn on the hob and bake the perfect Victoria sponge cake at age 12.

Despite the emphasis on turning out girls who knew how to use a knife and fork correctly - I still managed to get into University (when universities were still universities) and go on to do an MA too. This - I think - was largely due to my parent encouragement and expectation that we could do it - despite being consider over ambitious by my peers.

And would I send my son - maybe when he's a teenager but right now my insinct is to say "no".

Anonymous said...

For me as a parent, I'm meant to be the main carer not some institution. To send kids away is strange to me, because they belong with their family.

4x4 said...

anon-the school and your peer group become part of your family when you are at boarding school and you still get to see your parents.
I have a great relationship with my parents even though they sent me to boarding school.
For many children, being around their families is the worst place they can be-how many dysfunctional families do you hear about.
I have often thought the wrong children get sent to boarding school. Many kids from sink estates etc who under achieve would be far better off if they were taken out of their environment and away from poor parenting. Look at the number of absent fathers in the black community for example. The children go on to recreate a family environment through gang culture. Would boarding school at an early age be of use to these youngsters?
Or are we saying that these children are genetically programmed to fail and that the environment makes no difference whatsoever?

Fabhat said...

I went to Crown Woods in Eltham for a couple of years - and they had a small boarding section - for children who would otherwise have been in care, or whose parents were in the services. I don't know how effective it was in the long term, but it did mean that those children didn't disappear out of the school system as they might have done otherwise.

Anonymous said...

I wonder why they chose Brockley for these dumb asses ??

The Cat Man said...

Its cheap

State Schooler And Proud said...

With regard to the boarding school debate, I think it entirely depends on the child and the parents. In my experience, a bright, motivated child with supportive parents will rise to the top in any environment so it's a waste of money sending them to a private/public school. Slightly dim children will do a lot better in the private system because they will be trained/spoonfed to do well in exams. A bit like monkeys, I suppose.
I went to a state school in the NE of England, then went to Oxford and graduated with a first. I was at college with people who went to Eton and who terrified me initially because of their confidence (I think that's the main advantage of a private education), but after a year or two I realised that they were actually spouting utter nonsense, just said with confidence. Several public school people got chucked out for failing exams/under performing/being wasters who couldn't stand on their own two feet. Obviously, many others achieved very highly. It depends entirely on the person.

Headhunter said...

I've got a friend who went to a posh boarding school. His parents thought that he would get the best education and upbringing there I suppose and it's quite funny to see him with his dad now.

He speaks "posh" with a cut glass accent and now works in the City but he is originally from good, old Black Country working class stock. His dad has a thick Wolverhampton accent, he's a lovely guy but is so different - he spends his time wearing jeans and T shirt propping up the bar over a pint of Banks's Mild chin wagging about the footy whereas his son is more at home discussing Rugby or cricket in a Harris tweed jacket and shirt.

The effect of boarding school education is striking!

Headhunter said...

State Schooler And Proud - I don't think it's necessarily true that an intelligent child will do well in any environment. Intelligence is all well and good but not every child (or adult) has the maturity or desire to push themselves.

In mixed ability classes, teachers are inevitably often caught up with lower achieving kids and teach to the lowest common denominator. Higher achieving kids are more or less left to themselves.

I went to a mixed ability state school and truly believe that I would have done better in a grammar type school where I would have had competition. I was a laid back kid so didn't push myself and it was easy just to coast through school. In some classes like languages, me and a couple of others were way ahead of the rest of the class just doing our own thing, but the teacher didn't have the time to spend with us as she was busy explaining things again and again to the rest of the class, occasionally she would pop over and ask if we were OK and tell us to do the nezxt exercise. We pretty much taught ourselves French from the text book!

If bright kids are thrown in with kids of similar ability, they all help raise the collective bar. However, of course a private education is not guaranteed to mean your kid is in a class of others of similar ability.

Anonymous said...

I know someone who sent there kids to boarding school,one was ok but the other didn't conform and failed all his exams,What a waste of money.

Strawmanism said...

State Schooler And Proud - said "a bright, motivated child with supportive parents will rise to the top in any environment"

Headhunter interpreted it as "I don't think it's necessarily true that an intelligent child will do well in any environment. Intelligence is all well and good but not every child (or adult) has the maturity or desire to push themselves."

State Schooler And Proud said...

Headhunter, I agree (which is why I said bright AND motivated! You do need to be both). Certainly I was lucky because I was in a good class with 3 or 4 other bright girls and we were all highly competitive. However, as you say, there's no guarantee that the pupils at private/public school will be bright either, only that their parents have enough money to send them there!

Headhunter said...

OK, OK, obviously not as bright as I thought, good thing I went to a state comp!

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Tressillian James said...

I agree with the comment that public/private schools appear to give their pupils an amazing sense of self-confidence - which I believe takes them far.

I went to a state school and was made more aware of imposed limitations (ie, a careers teacher telling me that only those form private schools can go into diplomatic service) and the things I'couldn't' do more than anything else.

If i had kids I would want them to have the kind of confidence that public/private schools engender

Headhunter said...

Yep, definintely TJ, I took up fencing when I was 13 (swords not round gardens) and fenced in a few county competitions. Most of the other competitors were "posh" private school kids and I remember feeling quite intimidated by their and the teachers general air of confidence.

Since then I've witnessed how this confidence alone gets you what you want in life, most of the candidates and clients at investment banks I deal with daily are privately educated and retain that air of confidence.

Anonymous said...

Bankers and confidence: it's not just the schooling that leads to that kind of confidence ;)

Anonymous said...

"people who went to Eton and who terrified me initially because of their confidence... I realised that they were actually spouting utter nonsense, just said with confidence"


we can welcome that if Gordon Brown loses the next election then.

State Schooler And Proud said...

Sadly, you're right, TJ and HH, that confidence can get people a long way in life. However, if there really isn't anything behind it they often get found out in the end!

Tressillian James: 'I went to a state school and was made more aware of imposed limitations (ie, a careers teacher telling me that only those from private schools can go into diplomatic service) and the things I 'couldn't' do more than anything else'.

This is more an indication of a bad careers teacher than anything. I know several people from state schools who are in the diplomatic service! Times are a-changing.

drakefell debaser said...

Several people have cited confidence as being a key benefit of a private education which is quite interesting.

Does anyone have a view on what a private school does differently to give its pupils this confidence?

State Schooler And Proud said...

Obviously that question will require some generalisation. However, I think pupils (on the whole) come from a more privileged background in the first place, so they have a certain sense of entitlement. This is developed at private school as they are constantly told they're great, privileged, in the top xx% of the country etc etc. They generally have more opportunities to try their hand at more activities and the resources available to them are often second to none, so they are more likely to find something they excel at. They are surrounded by people with successful (or at least rich - I suppose it depends how you would define successful) parents. They meet lots of people 'like them' and very few from other backgrounds. They are given a lot more attention because class sizes are much smaller, enhancing their feelings of self importance. Basically, they're made to feel important, I think that's it in a nutshell!

But don't get me wrong - I wouldn't send my children!

Anonymous said...

I went to a state school which had both fencing and horse riding.

Bea said...

I don't think the sole reason that private sector kids come across as confident is because they have a sense of entitlement (although I'm sure that plays a part for some kids) or because they come from a "privileged" background but because the attitude in many schools is more go-getting. They encourage you to succeed and do not necessarily put you down for being intelligent or trying to do well.

And in boarding schools the kids have to grow up fast - either sink or swim. You are left on your own with your peers and cannot go running to mummy when a kid is being mean to you. You learn to deal with petty arguments on your own and when you feel homesick it's just tough you have to get on with it.

In addition, there's the whole dealing with the mundane routine of life i.e. getting up in time in the morning to get down for breakfast (can't remember how many times I got detention for getting there late!), dealing with stuff like personal hygiene without your parents nagging you, making sure your clothes are washed, your bedding laundered, your section of the dormitory tidy etc etc. If you're doing all this at the age of 11 already it's a tough challenge. There is, of course, a matron but she doesn't check or nag at the minutia of your daily life in the same way, say, your mother would.

Also many boarding school kids are farmed out to relatives and family friends at half term (especially if their parents are abroad). This means traveling alone by train half way across the country to get there and once there having to be on best behavior all the time!

All the above means getting over your nerves and dealing with strange and sometime intimidating situations thereby building confidence. It also helps in the confidence stakes to know that despite being at boarding school you have a loving and supportive family behind you who are sending you there because they think it's in your best interest or because circumstances mean there's no alternative.

So by the time many boarding school kids are 14 they're brimming with confidence. However, despite the fun had at boarding school (good friends on tap day and night), activities such as horse riding and playing rounders until dusk in summer - deep down there is also a sadness that your parents aren't nearby.- especially in the pre-teen years.

state Schooler And Proud said...

That's interesting Bea, I hadn't looked at it from that angle. I must say, some of the boarding schoolers I met at university were the just the opposite of the people you describe - yes, they were accustomed to being away from home but when they weren't being explicitly told when, where and how to do something they were left floundering.

The freedom of university seemed to be very different from the restrictions of boarding school. They couldn't manage their time efficiently because they'd always been told when to do their homework and watched while they did it. At school they got up because everyone around them was getting up; at uni they had their own rooms and were always late and dishevelled!

Also, the most noticeable thing was that they sought out people like them and really struggled to communicate with state school people (or didn't want to). In particular, some of the boys who had gone to single-sex schools had a very weird relationship with women at uni - they treated them like aliens!

Obviously for every one person who was as I describe, there were 10 who coped admirably; however, you could say the same for people from state school backgrounds.

why so negative? said...

SSP

Im afraid you come across as chippy; I'm sure you don't mean to.

Do your comments apply equally to all private schools or is it just b/s of which you have apparently no personal experience at all that are singled out for your attention?

Why on earth would someone with the money NOT send their children to the best school available? It beggars belief that parents wouldn't if they could!

As for your biassed and ill informed comments on Etonians, you give no indication that you understand the tremendous benefits of being at such a school, simply that they spoke "utter nonsense with confidence".

I can see benefits of being at home with parents certainly and being at certain State schools probably gives you more of a mix of backgrounds than prvate schools and, I would have expected, a commensurate ability to adapt to other people.

However, you fail to demonstate the latter quality. The basis of intelligence - and indeed success in working life - is being able to understand other people's view points but you appear to have no inclination to start that process.

Headhunter said...

"I went to a state school which had both fencing and horse riding."

Yeah my school had sailing and golf lesson among other things but that alone doesn't give you the sense of confidence that private/public school pupils have

Brockley Nick said...

@why so negative

Your post assumes that we all have the same definition of what constitutes the "best" school.

As has already been made clear in the discussion, there are many reasons for choosing a school and people attach different weightings to different qualities.

Some people are focused on academic performance, others on extra-curricular activities, others on proximity to home and family, etc.

This being the case, there is no single "best" school.

State Schooler And Proud said...

Why so negative?, I take on board some of your comments. Obviously I can only comment on my own experiences, and as I have tried to say throughout, for the purpose of this debate I have generalised and at the same time pointed out where I have done so and said that there are also just as many - if not many many more - people who do not conform to the 'private school person' I am portraying. Just as not all people from state schools live on sink estates and join gangs, not all private school people are Tim Nice But Dims. For the sake of a vivid debate, I always think it best to be slightly provocative!

I do recognise that there are some tremendous benefits from being at Eton and other boarding schools, one of which - the innate sense of confidence - several people have commented upon here. I have also talked about the fantastic resources and opportunities available to them. However, I also believe there are some downsides, and that is what I have been discussing. I take issue with your comment:
'Why on earth would someone with the money NOT send their children to the best school available? It beggars belief that parents wouldn't if they could!'
The point is that what constitutes the 'best school' is largely subjective depending on what's important to you, and it also depends on the kind of child you have. Some children would thrive in the boarding school system and some wouldn't; also, as you say, there are benefits to being at home with your family and learning to mix with people from all backgrounds. There's no clear-cut answer to what makes a brilliant school. Certainly, the mere fact that it is fee-paying doesn't make it brilliant.

Anonymous said...

HH Maybe your right but my mate sent his son to a private school,and he failed all his exams,So his dad has paid thousands for him to be confident

4x4 said...

Anon-If his Dad paid thousands to give his son confidence then it was money well spent. There are lots of people who fail exams and are left with no self-confidence.
@SSaP-"they meet many people like them and very few from different backgrounds"-really?
My peers and myself have always mixed with people from different backgrounds, at Uni in sports teams, at work and people who do work for us such as cleaning, driving, gardening etc. I often find that some people from different backgrounds to myself can be more hostile to my friends and I than the other way round. Anyone who works for me is treated with respect.

Brockley Nick said...

"Some of my best friends are servants."

Priceless.

Anonymous said...

I would like to employ a servant if possible - that's a minimum wage surely?

Richard said...

Confidence is such a valuable thing to take from school. I went from being top of my class at a decent local primary (Stillness) to sitting amongst boys at my state selective school in Orpington who had been to primaries with higher aspirations for their pupils. They had all been prepped for entrance exams and grammar school standards. I was suddenly behind everybody else (what was a square root?!) and my confidence sapped.

Hard work brought me level and the confidence returned. But yes, schools like that begin telling you you're in the top x%, to wear your school tie to interviews, that we don't play football because it's common (honestly, bastards), that university is a certainty and Oxbridge a likelihood. Good for confidence, but too many, myself included, get complacent, think university will be a doddle, etc etc.

That's the measure of a good teacher at any school - to develop confidence without naivety, laziness and a chip on the shoulder. I know plenty of boys from my school year who achieved well below their potential at A-level and university because they had been told they were great & believed everything would come easy. My favourite is the guy who flunked his A-levels and went into Ultimate Fighting!

4x4 said...

I like to call them 'Help' rather than servants Nick and certainly not best friends. Being too familiar with the 'Help' can lead to disaster-ask Phil collins or Chris De Burgh.

State Schooler And Proud said...

4x4, 'If his Dad paid thousands to give his son confidence then it was money well spent.'

There are many other - FREE - ways of giving your children confidence, it's just that some people think that throwing money at something or someone is the only solution. It's certainly an easy, lazy solution because it means you can pass all responsibility to someone else.

'I often find that some people from different backgrounds to myself can be more hostile to my friends and I than the other way round.'

It's a shame that expensive education didn't teach you the correct way to use 'me' and 'I'.

Anonymous said...

SS and P, It has been pretty obvious for a while that 4 by 4 is joking. But don't you stop to think that it's pretty insecure to comment on another's grammar? Just how it comes across.

Richard, that's appalling. When I was at school - private as it happens - every single one of us in a class of ca. 25 girls could do all tables, multiply by 50, 25 and 20 in our heads and of course do all long divisions etc on paper. (aged 7)

I cannot remember specifically when we did sq root - do you mean remembering exact ones or questions like " "find the sq root of 700", which is harder of course.

We all learned, with varying degrees of success, alg, geometry and trig around age 10. I think calculus came later. I still find some of the things we did then - eg simultaneous equations - useful
in normal life, which frequently surprises me.

PS this was in the late 70s early 80s by the way

grammarian said...

SS and P,

By the way you have made several mistakes in your own postings. Others have been good enough not to draw these to your attention.

State Schooler And Proud said...

Grammarian, actually I am not so arrogant as to think that I never make errors and would be happy for somebody (you, perhaps, as your name implies that you are well qualified for the job) to point them out to me. How can one improve one's grammar if one isn't prepared to have one's mistakes corrected?

Anonymous said...

"not AS arrogant" for starters.

State Schooler And Proud said...

I didn't say 'as arrogant'. Bad luck, try again.

State Schooler And Proud said...

Oh, I see, that was the correction? I think you'll find that my sentence was perfectly correct.

psssst... said...

Perhaps a private education would have helped your command of the English language SS&P.

State Schooler And Proud said...

Perhaps you're right - if only somebody could point out where my command of said language has let me down.
Maybe I'll revert to the argument often used by people with dodgy grammar and/or spelling - 'you all knew what I meant and that's the most important thing'.

Anonymous said...

Does grammar matter these days,I always read the words not full stops a comers.

an observation said...

Along with Hugh and Danja, SS and P is one of the more literate posters on here. It's interesting that after lambasting her(?) for correcting others' grammar, Grammarian et al go on to do exactly the same thing to her - that's a bit hypocritical, no?

The Cat Man said...

Theirs nuffin rong wiff mi gramma eitha fank yoo verry mach

another observation said...

You have drawn that conclusion from 11 posts.

A little impetuous, no?

the original observer said...

No more impetuous than awarding exam results based on manuscripts with a similar word count to those 11 posts.

the other observer said...

?

fred vest said...

seems to be a fairly high number of people here went to boarding/private school (compared to the national average), also noted on the love thread a fairly high amount of people who have made use of dating services - are the two things related perchance?

State Schooler And Proud said...

I think it is a fair reference to the fact that more important judgements are made on the basis of a lot less information (or, in this case, about the same amount).

Perhaps Original Observer has also picked up on my distinctive writing style and has spotted other postings of mine under other names ;-)

(I don't usually resort to redundant page furniture but am increasingly finding - not necessarily on this blog, before anyone bites my head off - that people can't recognise humour unless it is followed by 9 exclamation marks or a smiley face).

secondary observer failing to multi task. Again. said...

Or perhaps you are the same person posting under different names.

Anyway, I smell burning so must dash.

Tired & Going To Bed said...

Can't help noticing that nobody has yet risen to the challenge of pointing out SS&P's grammatical errors.

Anonymous said...

I was certainly appalled by the length of his/her dashes

4x4 said...

Having a go at peoples grammar is such a cheap shot. SS&P does sound chippy but I will have the good grace to forgive him. Manners you see.

Pete said...

Did anyone watch last night? I think they went for a drink in the Brockley Jack.

fabhat said...

I'll admit it - I watched again. We thought that was the Brockley Jack too. must have been bussed over, as I can't imagine they'd walk...after the fuss made when walking 100yards from tesco metro. I don't know how many more episodes I can bear to watch though.

Tyrwhitt Michael said...

If you are a real masochist its repeated at 8pm on Tuesday nights.

And thereafter on a daily basis in the early hours!

Can't say I saw them in the Wickham whilst they were filming. I assume they are now long gone.

Anyone know why Dogan is prnounced Dohan?

Anonymous said...

because the 'g' is silent?

Anonymous said...

Because if it was pronounced as written, he would have to be up in Hilly Fields enjoying some eponymous action?

Crofton Parker said...

The shame of it all - watched it again last night. Featured one of the girls, standing in front of post office at Brockley Cross, refusing to ask in local shops for a job because "the shops here are all crap". The sad thing is I have accidentally become caught up enough in it to FUME over the parents' choice of who got kicked out. They were so unfair...

lee scott said...

HOW FIT IS DINA she better win!!!!

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