Images of Greenwich - Excel cable car released




A proposal to connect the O2 and the Excel Centre with a cable car has taken a step forward with the release of the design by architects Wilkinson Eyre. The project needs to raise private finance in order to happen, but it has the support of the Mayor and could win planning approval as early as January 2011.


When complete, the cars would carry as many as 2,500 passengers per hour to a height of more than 50 metres on the 1.1km route, taking approximately five minutes.

No substitute for the major river crossing this end of town needs, it's nonetheless a fun and potentially useful crossing, connecting two of London's most important visitor attractions, each at the heart of major regeneration projects.

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

How can this possibly be justified at a time of cutbacks? I despair.

Brockley Nick said...

Because it's privately funded!

Anonymous said...

Monorail!

darryl said...

MONORAIL!

The private funds still aren't in place, although I'm sure the owners of the O2 and ExCel will be keen on the idea - the O2's owners had wanted to build one to Canary Wharf at one point.

tracy said...

Oh yes monorail

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF_yLodI1CQ

Lyle Lanley said...

MONO...DOH!

Onanist said...

Like the ELL, Boris Bikes and the DLR it will be out of the reach of the retarded strikers from the London Underground who as long as they have a hole in their backsides will go on strike for whatever reason they can cobble together in their backward minds.

Well done Boris.

fabhat said...

The contract notice for the cable car has been published:
6. UK-London: cable cars
Entry Date: 11/11/2010
Reference: Not provided
Type of document: Contract Notice
Country: UNITED KINGDOM
Nature of contract: Works contract

A cable car for London. Transport for London (TfL) with the support of the London Development Agency (LDA) have been developing a proposal to run a cable car across the Thames between North Greenwich and Royal Victoria in east London. The vision is for the cable car to be a new iconic structure for London which provides both a viable public transport option for users and suppor...

Anonymous said...

... wouldn't the cable car proposal put more pressure on the usage of North Greenwich Tube station, which is somewhat over capacity already.

Frankly it is more of a gimmick rather than a real mode of transportation!

Tamsin said...

The Millenium Wheel was a gimmick but is absolutly wonderful. This is a great idea and I'm glad it's a long step nearer reality.

And on spending money on such bold ideas when times are difficult - one of key figures in NASA (I will check the reference later) was once asked in a press conference how it could be justified, spending so much money "on the moon", and responded that all the £xmillion were spent on Earth and 90% of it in America.

Tamsin said...

Sorry - that's $xmillion (before someone else points it out to me!). Blue Streak was more of a blue stumble for lack of funds.

Anonymous said...

But I didn't have to pay for NASA.

I'll have to pay for this crap. (Or more likely we'll borrow the money and my kids will pay for it). Still nice to know public money is being wisely husbanded, when we can't even afford a handful of small libraries any more.

Monkeyboy said...

The cable car could pay to keep police on the beat. The police on the beat could pay for new schools. The schools could pay for a more trees. Te trees could pay for better provision for war widows, the war pensions could pay for more nurses. What about the art galleries, science funding, the monarchy.....ok scrap the last one...

The comparisons make good soundbites but rarely give you any answers.

welcome to 2011 said...

what is it you expect to have to pay for? (heaven forbid)

they're both privately funded.

Tamsin said...

But as Nick said at the outset - this will be private money being SPENT - has to be good. The main problem with 2008 debacle is that having scared themselves sh**less by criminally stupid lending the bankers are now sitting tight on their profits and blaming the new regulatory provisions.

Let's have a cable car - even though it's a gimmick. And let's have those physically building it earning money and spending it locally, and papying taxes to put police on the streets and books in the schools etc.

Anonymous said...

More fantasy economics. Lets take blood from the patient and then transfuse the same patient with it. The limits of Keynesianism have been reached. The junkie logic of just one more fix is beginning to sound hollow.

Anyone who believes this gimmick will not impact the public purse has greater faith in our super quangoised rulers than I have. Remember the initial budget for the olympics was 2.5billion, and what is it today?

The point of the comparison with the closure of libraries, is that we are now in a world of hard choices. People don't want to face this, but if we don't then harder choices lie down the road. Woolly psuedo socialist soundbites are all well and good, but don't play that well on the bond markets.

The point about the banks is that when they were the geese that were laying golden eggs, governments were happy to take the revenues and spend, spend, spend, (and more worryingly, borrow, borrow, borrow). Structural deficits are the problem, not an expensive, but ultimately zero sum rescue for the banks. Still its comforting to have someone to blame for our own gullibility and greed.

Brockley Nick said...

Goodness, what a breathless string of economic non-sequiturs, plucked straight from a Simon Heffer column.

The cruise liner terminal is no more a public sector project than a new office block at Canary Wharf would be. Presumably you're not opposed to private sector investment, otherwise the economy really is screwed.

The cable car is supposed to be private sector funded, with only £1.2m of public money committed. That's a tiny amount, given the private investment and transport capacity it could unlock. Perhaps Boris might be called upon to inject a few more millions at some point - let's save the hysterics for then when a cost-benefit analysis might be required, shall we.

Until then, we are discussing planning approval given to two private sector projects. So your points about the Olympics, libraries, banks and Keynes are entirely irrelevant.

Brockley Nick said...

PS - it's telling that in their haste to tell everyone what morons they are, the anons are posting on the wrong thread.

Russell said...

MONORAIL! The private funds still aren't in place, although I'm sure the owners of the O2 and ExCel will be keen on the idea - the O2's owners had wanted to build one to Canary Wharf at one point.

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