How Brockley Central Works


Man in pub at Brockley Central Drinks:

Have you seen tonight's thelondonpaper?

Brockley Nick:

No?

Man:

There's a picture of some graffiti in Brockley in it.

Nick:

That's tomorrow's article of the day sorted then. Thanks.


The featured graffiti is one of a series of biting social commentaries scattered across SE4's walls.

60 comments:

Anonymous said...

Maybe the artist lives outside the conservation area, where no one is required to 'buy' their house, thanks to Gordon Brown's department of Work and Pensions!

Headhunter said...

Can we see some more examples of this "series of biting social commentaries"?

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

So, you're required to buy yor house in the conservation area? what does that mean?

Me said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

It means exactly what it says.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

So you're telling me, people cant rent in the conservation area? thats bull*ocks.

No social housing in the conservation area? Thats bull*ocks too.

Headhunter said...

Oh god, Andy has fallen victim to a conservation area troll...

Brockley Jon said...

They're not all biting social commentaries – the one on Florence Road railway bridge says “Tasmin is having problems with her fringe” or words to that affect. Or is it actually a biting social commentary? Discuss.

Tom said...

'eternal jerk off' has now joined 'toes ask' as deeply meaningful Brockley slogans

Headhunter said...

Personally I find "toes ask" has far more deep meaning than something as superficially vulgar as "eternal jerk off"...

Headhunter said...

Jon - yes I saw that Tamsin/fringe graf last night on the way home quite late. Is that the Tamsin who writes here I wonder?

Tom said...

I do remember my joy when I finally realised what all this 'toes ask' stuff was about!

However, I think 'eternal jerk off' does have a kind of winsome immediacy. A blunt statement of Brockley reality.

Sorry to miss the drinks last night. Had a BBQ at mine (rented, in the conservation area).

Anonymous said...

This genius piece of public art was on mantle road only yards from Eternal Jerk Off - confirming what I already thought - westside is Brockley's political quarter.

Anonymous said...

What does 'toes ask' mean?

Tom said...

@11.05 Indeed!

42?

Headhunter said...

The answer to the ultimate question... Life, the universe and everything....

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

I live westside, I'm not political at all....

*cough*

Anonymous said...

well maybe its all the people who can't afford to live here anymore because lots of people are selling up and having to go back to renting there is a few in our road,

Tressillian James said...

with such a recognisable script (look at the 'd') - the police should have no trouble rounding up the vandal...or is this different to the outrage that was caused when the Jam Factory was graffitied? A political message is art..or railway bridges are an ok target -hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

waltz4aidan said...

glorifying lame graffiti is in no no-one's interest..it's really not clever, just crap, and now other rubbish tags pop up to bring down the street.i'm mixed on the art vs vandalism debate but that is just irritating. it's funny or witty until someone spraypaints your front door.

Brockley Kate said...

There's one on the corner of Harefield Mews and Cranfield Road that says 'Beware The Boris' ...

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

lol thats quite funny. It wasnt me, im far too law abiding, but if I had guts of would of said something like that!

Tamsin (totally fringeless) said...

Unless it is modern slang that I am blissfully unaware of the only trouble I have with a fringe is that I haven't had one since I was about eight.

Talking with a neighbour over our back fence only a few hours ago. It's not Gordon Brown's fault that people can't buy houses but Maggie Thatchers and the free market economy. Once mortgage lenders began to compete seriously with each other and slacken the 3 times salary restrictions on mortgage lending house prices went through the roof.

45000 repossessions expected this year...

Wicked exploitation.

Tamsin said...

On the matter of graffiti/art. Does anyone else recall the "Happiness in Brockley Posters" a few years back.

I've got a set of postcards of them somewhere which I will get over to Nick to publish on this site.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

couldn't agree with you more Tamsin, re. Margaret Thatcher.

Anonymous said...

h1>BBC News Updated every minute of every day

information guru said...

Brockley blogger nominated for prize!

Brockley Jon said...

I'm sorry, but who the hell are these people (robots?) who keep coming onto the blog and posting links to BBC News!? I mean, they could at least post a link to some crap property blog or some dubious anti-spyware software. It's not even worth the moderation effort.

Anonymous said...

News Flash - Robots attack on Brockley's Streets

Anonymous said...

"Take us to your leader!"

Anonymous said...

News flash

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

very very bizarre....!

Anonymous said...

Has anyone noticed the banksy-like key on the side of a house between costcutter and brockley station?

From a certain perspective it looks like the house it's painted onto is run by clockwork.

Brockley Nick said...

There's an article about the key on BC:

http://brockleycentral.blogspot.com/2007/05/key-to-small-part-of-city.html

Anonymous said...

Yeah, just found it, thanks. Had no idea that cafe was the ubiquitous 'Toads Mouth Too' - how do they get away with having such a strange name with no sign actually telling you what they're called, other than 'cafe'?

spincat said...

On the railway bridge - the one near Eternal Jerk - there once was a mural of a man with an outstretched, welcoming arm, and an afghan hat, that I was sure was Osama Bin Laden. Some agreed with me that it was he, some didn't. Think it has bin removed.

Anonymous said...

The Toad's Mouth is named after a story by Isabel Allende about a prostitute. It's a euphemism for a certain part of a woman's anatomy. We call it c**t cafe.

Tamsin said...

"toes ask"? Tell me more.

Tamsin said...

The key has been there for ages and is done by Artmongers. Who also did the Fabric of Society around the undercroft area of Cafe Orange - worth a close look to read all the "stories" attached to the fabrics - and various murals in Deptford. Brilliant stuff. It is the same person who "dressed" the trees in the Telegraph Hill festival a few years back and is working on the "grand vision" for the Centre referred to on another blog entry.

The key is absolute tops - with the very realistic shadow it works from almost every angle.

Look up "Artmongers" on a well known search engine and get to their site.

ade said...

@ anon - is that true? which isabel allende book? and why call it TM Too?

Anonymous said...

Its true apparently. Michelle the owner told me - its one of Allende's short stories I believe.

Anonymous said...

Well that's the last time I buy a tuna sandwich from there.

JPM said...

There are masses of properties rented out in the Conservation Area. It was only created (by a neighbour in my road) to preserve the look and feel of the Victorian houses and their leafy surroundings. It did not call for the exclusion of those who rent. Or those who are socially housed for that matter.

In fact, the Conservation Area, rentals, and social housing, go hand in hand. And so too those who are fortunate enough (fortunate?) to have bought.

Neither is Gordon Brown to blame for the housing 'crises'. the property market(s) move's in cycles. (You can work it out to around about eight years, at which point wage inflation begins to catch up with stagnant property prices. (There is an economist here I'm sure, but times wage increases by eight years and watch them buyers return.)

The loose tile on the roof, besides bad investment abroad by the banks (which is also related vis-vis subprime) is the Buy-to-Let market. It's only very recent in the property market(s) cycle that we have seen open speculation, in other words the ordinary man in the street seizing property as an investment. (An open secret previously known only in Masonic circles.)

Where will it end? I haven't a clue.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

I have no idea too, but theres an added dimension to think about (which wasn't there in the 1980's)..

...The EU convergence criteria.

Our economy has a much higher proportion of people who own their own house compared to the mainland EU, I think the development of the buy to let (and more people renting) would be seen as a positive step towards EU inegration by the UK government.

Tom said...

I think trying to understand the housing market through the prism of a supposed UK agenda to merge the country with Europe is a something of an over-reach!

(A better proof would be the UK government pushing for EUR-denominated mortgages. Didn't happen.)

I think the powers that be believe the UK housing market would be improved if it had a better-working private rental market.

Re housing as investment, this really developed on the back of alienation from equities c.2001-2002 and cheap, cheap credit.

But as they say in the markets, once the retail investor comes in, it's time for the professionals to leave.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

Tom, It is just one of many factors to consider, not the over-riding concern.

Tressillian James said...

But is a stronger Buy-to Let market one of the convergence criteria.........and how would it help us to merge the economies closer.

APP&P Troll said...

The response to a change in the interest rates affects consumers in the UK differently as we are generally more exposed due to having a higher proportion of household ownership on variable rate mortgages or short term fixed rate mortgages.

For any of those interested:

"In order to ensure the sustainable convergence required for the achievement of economic and monetary union (EMU), the Treaty sets four convergence criteria which must be met by each Member State before it can take part in the third stage of EMU and hence before it can adopt the euro. Compliance is checked on the basis of reports produced by the Commission and the European Central Bank (ECB). The criteria are:

the ratio of government deficit to gross domestic product must not exceed 3% and the ratio of government debt to gross domestic product must not exceed 60%;
there must be a sustainable degree of price stability and an average inflation rate, observed over a period of one year before the examination, which does not exceed by more than one and a half percentage points that of the three best performing Member States in terms of price stability;
there must be a long-term nominal interest rate which does not exceed by more than two percentage points that of the three best performing Member States in terms of price stability;
the normal fluctuation margins provided for by the exchange-rate mechanism must be respected without severe tensions for at least the last two years before the examination.
The convergence criteria are meant to ensure that economic development within EMU is balanced and does not give rise to any tensions between the Member States. The criteria relating to government deficit and government debt must continue to be met after the start of the third stage of EMU (1 January 1999). To this end, a stability pact was adopted at the Amsterdam European Council in June 1997 and enables the members of the Euro-zone to coordinate national government budget policies and avoid excessive government budget deficits."

Now, i'm a troll....

Anonymous said...

On the continent I understand they have fixed rate mortgages that cover the entire term.

If we had that, maybe it would add some stability and reduce the repossesion rate.

Danja said...

You can get them here - but they are not very popular because they are relatively expensive (because you are passing so much risk to the lender). And the break fees are off-putting.

Tom said...

Continental Europe has a much larger private rental market as well.

But as far as I could see the driver behind the development of a UK private rental market was to support liquidity in the housing market as a whole rather than some nebulous European project.

Some people see the nefarious hand of the dastardly foreigner wherever they look!

Moving on, I have been told by a number of Brockley people and estate agents that the Conservation Area is a much better value place to rent than to buy, because so much of the Conservation Area is rental property.

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

That is interesting, maybe I should rent out my darkside house and start renting myself in the lightside!

andy pandy pudding & pie said...

This really hit the headlines - per the Spectator:

"The writing's on the wall

There is a housing development in Brockley, south east London, with an extraordinary piece of graffiti. “Thanks to Gordon Brown, I will never buy a house,” it says, and in super-large lettering no less"

Anonymous said...

That graffiti is wrong.
Surely thanks to Gordon Brown, people WILL now be able to buy.

Arguably his management of the economy and failure to regulate banks who would happily lend six times an individual's salary without proper checks ramped up prices to unsustainable levels and is paving the way to a housing collapse.

Anonymous said...

There is far less liquidity in continental rental markets. Lots of tenant protection laws in France, for example, that discourages landlords from letting properties. Often they would rather leave them empty.

If there was any sort of EU influence over here we would see more of that.

As usual AP&P is mostly just plain wrong.

APP&P Troll said...

@anon, I have no idea what point you're trying to make, in the above example your arguement and my arguement is two sides of the same coin!

Better leave it there though, as I'm a troll you see.....

APP&P Troll said...

@anon, I have no idea what point you're trying to make, in the above example your arguement and my arguement is two sides of the same coin!

Better leave it there though, as I'm a troll you see.....

fabhat said...

More graffiti from the same hand as the gordon brown missive...This time on the train bridge on vesta road
"lie back and think of england"
whoever it is has very distinctive handwriting.

Anonymous said...

Ah, how romantic. Much as I want it to be some Johnny Rotten-esque punk, bringing the system down from the inside, it's instead probably some Jeremy in a scarf, bringing his tea back from a deli. :-|

fabhat said...

But there are no deli's down vesta rd! I did have a good look round, to see if there was anything in particular being referred to, but couldn't see anything obvious. Has anyone else seen any more graffiti anywhere?

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