El's Kitchen comes to Ladywell

El's Kitchen is coming to Ladywell town centre. It will be a high-quality food retailer and caterer, operating from premises currently occupied by the Yes or Yes Cafe, a somewhat curious pancake place which unfortunately never really took off in Ladywell.


El's Kitchen has been operating as a virtual deli for some time, providing catering services and doing mountains of market research to understand what local people want. It should prove to be a massive asset to the area and we're looking forward to bringing you more news soon.

Founder Eleanor is also looking to find someone to help with the opening of the business. She says:

Fantastic opportunity to play a central role in the launch of El’s Kitchen! We're offering a great opportunity for a creative and dynamic individual to help launch this exciting new business.

This work experience position will give you a chance to get hands-on experience with marketing and website activities at a forward-thinking, young company. From writing advertising copy to direct mail pieces, organising photo shoots to uploading web content, they'll gain valuable skills and a portfolio of work to give their career a boost up the ladder.

This role would suit a switched-on, enthusiastic college or university-leaver with good grades and willingness to learn. If you, or someone you know, wants to find out more about the role, please email us at els_kitchen@yahoo.co.uk

36 comments:

Osh said...

Woop!

Marc said...

Really good news for Ladywell High Street. Wish Eleanor all the best and look forward to shopping round the corner !

Bill said...

Great news for Ladywell. However, Eleanor's call for a 'work experience' graduate or college leaver seems a strange choice over offering the opportunity to an experienced marketeer albeit one who may want to be paid something.

Of course, small business start-ups have limited funds but investing some in a professional service may be more beneficial than not spending anything and relying on someone's ambition to add something to their CV.

A small business with limited funds needs to be making the right decisions and making an impact from day 1. Experience counts.

If money is that tight then maybe offer an experienced professional some sort of fee or maybe some freebies at the Kitchen as payment in kind? Or a combination of both.

Anonymous said...

As someone who goes out of their way to buy fairtrade I am going to support blatant exploitation.

Anonymous said...

Sorry that is NOT.

Out of work marketing executive said...

...will work for salami

poelle said...

Working in deli and getting no chedd-ah,
packing up the foccacia but earning no bread-ah

oryx said...

I'm with Anon @ 19.42 (and 19.45!).

I will not be shopping anywhere that uses 'interns' and expects people to work for free.

Brockley Nick said...

Virtually every company uses interns at some point and governments of both hues have been trying to encourage companies to create more internships. It doesn't say whether the position is paid or unpaid. Of course internships can be exploitative, but a start up business that is offering someone real creative input and frontline work experience, rather than just employing them as a dogsbody is to be welcomed.

Please get off your high horses.

greed is good said...

Nick is right, and without where would this country, it's capitalism man!

Welcome to 2010 said...

Go to many London University websites, they are crying out for businesses offering internships.

Anonymous said...

If being on one's 'high horse' means exercising my right to not to shop somewhere that doesn't pay people to work, I'll stay on it, thank you.

NB I'm not saying this shop won't pay this person they're advertising for, but it sounds dangerously like it.

Brockley Nick said...

My agency employs interns occasionally. We pay minimum wage and we often do so in response to requests from people desperate to get some useful work experience.

Frankly, it's often more hassle than it's worth because internships are usually short and by the time they have understood the job it's time for them to go, but hopefully they will have learned something as a result and contributed something to our business. We do it in part because we think it's important to give people opportunities, particularly in times where jobs for young people are in such short supply.

It's not exploitative, other than in an "all property is theft" kind of way.

For any new business, money is inevitably going to be extremely tight. If an internship makes the difference between survival and failure for the business and gives the individual valuable experience, then it seems like a very good idea to me. Although Bill's point earlier on in well made and one I'm sure has been considered.

Having met El on more than one occasion, I consider to be a hard working and considerate person who has been trying for months to get her business off the ground. For someone to judge her on the basis of incomplete information is wrong, in my view.

Posters spend half their time on here telling me how precarious the local economy is for our poor beleaguered independent retailers and now all of a sudden, they are being characterised as fat cats.

Gore- don said...

yeah! the economy is built on 'exploitation' from women in the home and their free labour; cooking, cleaning, sex- when it should be paid for or is it? to indian and chinese workers, where would I be without that Chinese produced computer...several thousand pounds poorer that's work.

So viva the exploitation, in fact those kids should be paying for experience they'll be getting and this will be a good income stream for the new business.

Brockley Nick said...

Didn't really follow that.

Anonymous said...

I would suggest the only handicap to Els Kitchen is appearing on this blog - but perhaps best to get the negative thing over sooner than later - and we await a honeyed comment from Lou

Anonymous said...

I find the use of interns very suspect. It's usually the young people from well off families that take up internships as their families can afford to support them. I'm an employer and I belive that if you put in a days work you should e paid for it.

Fair is fair. said...

Let's be clear here, no one has slagged off or cast any nasty remarks towards the individual or the business. What some people have pointed out and object to, quite rightly given that we are in commercial world- is the pontential expectation of someone putting in a days work but not getting paid. It's a matter of principle brought about by the particular circumstances of this thread.

I wish the business owners all the best.

oryx said...

Nick, if your agency pays 'interns' minimum wage I can see no issue with that, if they are extremely inexperienced and keen to get that experience.

Working for free, on the other hand, is exploitative and as Anon @8.29 says, tends to only be available to those with a 'family' (sic) income.

There is a lot of debate at the moment around unpaid work experience (commonly known as what I believe was originally a north American term, interning) and it is an ethical minefield. If the shop owner comes back and confirms it is a paid post I'm sure all of us who have sounded off about this will be very happy to stand corrected......

drakefell debaser said...

Oh, is that how it works, you cast aspersions and then the business owner has to come back to correct you?

Would it not be better, more polite even, to have some facts before sounding off?

Trixie said...

I agree that full time unpaid internships are elitist and exploitative. But to say you won't utilise a service because of the fact they're offering work experience is ridiculous. Do you not watch/listen to anything the bbc produces? because they use unpaid staff all the time https://jobs.bbc.co.uk/fe/tpl_bbc03.asp?newms=info06
would you reccomend that someone interested in getting into media turn down a placement with the bbc because it's unpaid? Competition for graduate jobs is ridiculous at the moment and if you can do a placement to gain experience that's a great opportunity. Yes, it will be hard work, yes, you may have to work a second job in a bar but at least you're doing something and not signing on! This job seems to me to be something that a young person could fit in around another casual job and would give them something to put on their CV that demonstrates their skills better than 'I worked in a shop'
As Nick said, get off your high horses!

Anonymous said...

REPEAT- NO ONE SAID ANYTHING NASTY ABOUT THE BUSINESS

Simon@Geddes said...

I find this all very depressing.
El's Kitchen is offering someone invaluable experience in working in a start-up business.
Being the owner of a hair & beauty salon myself, I would have loved to have gained such experience in my early years-it would probably have saved me a lot of money in the future when I started up on my own.
There is a fair amount of risk attached to opening a Deli and it makes good commercial sense to keep wage costs to a minimum in the early stages. Remember, projections on a business plan are just 'guess-timates' and one cannot be sure of income streams and rate of growth until a trading pattern has been established.
There is a chicken and egg factor here-you need the people to grow the business but you may not have the cash flow in order to keep afloat in the early stages.
El's Kitchen sells us the benefits above of working in their new venture. There is an element of risk attached to working without a guarantee of monetary reward but hey-we are all grown ups and are fully aware of the risks attached.
If a hairdresser wants get involved in photo/editorial work and catwalk shows they usually have to work for free on low budget shoots/shows in order to gain experience. Sometimes-not always-they get a credit or a few photos for their portfolio but very little else. Those who are willing to go the extra mile-take a chance and think of the big picture tend to get on. Those who are unwilling to make the sacrifices and who can't see the positives bemoan their lack of opportunity.
El's Kitchen isn't some big West End publishing company exploiting the excess of people wanting to get into so-called glamourous industries-it's a small independant local Deli offering an opportunity which could be mutually benefical to both parties.
Let's look at the positives-this could be just the opportunity someone else is looking for.
Please give El's Kitchen your support!

add said...

Creatives are used to being exploited, i think it's called the 'tournament model'.

oryx said...

I find the casual acceptance on here of people working unpaid to be utterly depressing.

None of you challenging those of us who put forward this view seem to be looking at it from either the wider viewpoint (the ripple effect of expectations that young people will work unpaid) or from the point of view of people who are so desperate to get the work they want that they will work unpaid.

If that isn't what the shop owner essentially posting a job ad on here meant, then I'm sure we will all stand corrected.

Simon@Geddes said...

@oryx-I take your point but when people immediately jump to the conclusion that El's Kitchen is about to exploit a young person then I do find that depressing.
Eleanor clearly lists the benefits of working in a start-up business and it is up to the individual to decide whether they want to get involved in this exciting journey.
If a young person doesn't fancy hands on experience and is too worried to take a chance at the risk of being exploited that's fine-their decision.
I can assure you of one thing though-should they take a chance and embrace this unique opportunity, they will probably gain more insight into the workings and challenges of a start-up small business than they will on any business studies course.
To say from the off that the new deli owner is going to exploit young people is presumtious, negative and depressing. It is a 'glass is half empty' mindset and it could disuade an enthusiastic, dynamic, creative young person with a passion for food and an interest in business from grasping a great opportunity.

Mondee said...

Well said Simon.

RosieH said...

Very excited to learn of Ladywell's new deli venture. When is it opening?

generation Y said...

I think if you are in your thirties, with your mortgage in a career or good paying job, then apprenticeships and internships make great sense. But if you have just come out of college, laden with debt you've worked hard to attain those desirable 'good grades' to be asked to work hard for FREE is a tough ask.

For someone to do a days work and get no pay is wrong.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

They are getting paid with marketable experience for the next job - better than moping at home wishing someone was going to pay them for having no experience.

peasoup said...

I went to El's kitchen today for the first time and ended up ordering a big cheese platter and two kinds of amazing bread for Christmas. El was lovely, really welcoming and helpful, as was the lady working with her - if she's an intern, she's very content in her job.

Hurrah for El's!

drakefell debaser said...

What, the intern is content?!

Glad to hear she is not being blatantly exploited and forced to sleep in a cupboard under the stairs, as some feared.

Anonymous said...

Is this the modern equivalent of what used to be known as 'working in Woolworths?'

TRM said...

Sorry, am I missing something here? El's Kitchen has advertised for an intern - paid or unpaid it doesn't really matter - it is the market that will decide. I'm sure there will be plenty of people interested. She is not forcing anything on anyone, people have a choice, and as such, I think it ridiculous to call it exploitation.

Orlly said...

It's been a few months now, how is the intern getting on. Is he or she now a paid member of staff? I've just come across this article TheInternship Myth and it would be good if the intern this business broke the apparent mould and received paid work.

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