Riverside South boosts Lewisham's future

Riverside South will create demand for homes in Lewisham

One of the world's leading banks, JP Morgan, has submitted a revised planning application for its new Canary Wharf HQ, signalling that the project is almost certain to proceed beyond the foundation construction which has been underway for over a year.

Riverside South is Europe's largest office development, providing 3m square feet to house JP Morgan's London employees. It means thousands more jobs will move to Canary Wharf and should trigger a rash of other developments in the area, including hotel and residential buildings. In short, it means the next wave of the expansion of Canary Wharf will proceed. Although work has been underway for some time, the developer's stated plan was to complete the foundations before confirming that it would proceed with the superstructure.

Many of Lewisham's most important development projects are predicated on the ongoing development of the Wharf, creating growing demand for housing along the route of the DLR. Brockley's organic growth is also being fuelled by the expansion of the Wharf and London Bridge as key employment hubs, dragging the centre of London south and east. The East London Line will dramtically cut commuting times for Canary Wharf workers, from early next year.


At London Bridge, the superstructure for the Shard has recently appeared, meaning that it remains on track to open in 2012, while demolition work to make room for its baby sister "the Gem" [above] has also begun.

62 comments:

Hugh said...

Try as I might I can't persuade myself that what happens at the Wharf has anything to do with Brockley. Young professionals working there have thousands of new-build executive apartments to choose from and all the amenities that the Wharf provides. The idea that significant numbers would buy places in the Brox, even with the ELL finished, seems fanciful.

Brockley Nick said...

Hugh, it's not speculation, it's already happened to a significant extent.

And it depends what you mean by "significant" numbers. A few hundred extra people in the area with high disposable incomes can make a lot of difference for pubs, cafes and shops struggling to find enough customers to turn a profit.

The Wharf already employs a good number of Brockley residents and its continued expansion is redrawing the map of London. eg: I have a friend at JPM now looking at Greenwich, Dulwich and Blackheath, who'd never thought to venture beyond west London before.

Hugh said...

Nick, I suppose time will tell. I don't doubt Wharfers will keep up demand for 6-bed Georgian gaffs with Heath views but the ones at lower rungs of the ladder seem, in my experience, to want to live in high-rise condos 5 minutes from the office.

I hope you're right and I'm wrong, speaking as a fellow local asset holder.

Tamsin said...

While the old ELL was working the link through to Canada Water (once the new stations were in place and you could get somewhere other than Shoreditch and Shadwell) was certainly a factor in property calculations within walking distance of New Cross and New Cross Gate. This was then messed up for years by the closure for the works to the tunnel and then, after a brief re-opening, the two year extension to points further south (my husband's firm found offices in Canary Wharf the month that the ELL closed!) but things should pick up again for everyone.

And those who never had the link to Charing Cross wont miss it...

Tamsin said...

Nick, why isn't your friend also looking at places in Telegraph Hill and Brockley - much more square footage for your money, still in reach of the GPDST and Dulwich schools and you are not knee-deep in tourists.

If he is seriously looking for a family house now a neighbour has one up for sale (a rare opportunity as the estate agents say since much of Telegraph Hill is turned into flats).
http://thehill.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=general&action=display&thread=753

Anonymous said...

You need to be a fair few rungs up from the bottom of the ladder to afford the kind of property you describe, Hugh, even at JP Morgan. There will be plenty of people for whom a flat in Brockley/Lewisham will be a far more realistic proposition than £500k for a 2-bedder in CW.

Tressillian James said...

Hugh - I was a wharf worker and bought in Brockley precisely because of it's proximity to the Wharf and the availability of large (3 bed+) Victorian flats. I know of 2 other posters here who are Wharf workers; my brother lets his flat to a Wharf worker; and ex-colleagues have also moved to the area - I'm not sure why you think that those who have a good income wouldn't consider living here; or wouldn't see Brockley as a good investment opportunity

david said...

Speaking as a Canary Wharfite (albeit plankton in Canary Wharf terms) who has bought in Telegraph Hill and knows other who have bought in Brockley and Crofton Park/Honour Oak over the last few years on the basis of the ELL/potential/community etc I'd say that there are at least a few already who think that the area offers lots of potential and much more for your (or the bank's) cash than West London or, indeed, Blackheath/Greenwich.

Anonymous said...

One the noticeable changes at Lewisham Station in the morning is the very large number of commuters who change from the overground to the DLR.

When I was a commuter to Charing Cross I hated having to switch trains at London Bridge added 10 - 15 mins to the journey.

Would those now switching transport at Lewisham and future commuters prefer to live in Lewisham (Gateway etc) to save that hassle?

-------

I know of someone with a large family house, with drive, 200ft south facing rear garden, easy access to 7 bus routes, 3 overground stations and the DLR, that will be on the market after the Olympics.

Brockley Nick said...

@Tamsin - do you not think I would have bent his ear about Brockley's charms already? He won't look at places like this because he likes postcode cache and he has enough money to buy where he likes.

Anonymous said...

Watching the morning traffic news everyday the A2, Blackheath, Shooters Hill and Woolwich are featured.

The problems seems to be related to traffic trying to find a river crossing point.

This may be worth an article...

Is more pollution caused by vehicles stuck in jams than if the same number of vehicles sped past because there was another bridge across the river?

Brockley Nick said...

"Is more pollution caused by vehicles stuck in jams than if the same number of vehicles sped past because there was another bridge across the river?"

Yes, much more. One of the many reasons why the decisision to scrap the Gateway bridge was so disastrous. But I think I've done that one to death! Google the articles on the site if you want to read more.

Tamsin said...

Of course you have, Nick. But this house is available straight away (before the Olympics!) and if he is in a situation where he is thinking at all about long term senior schools both Brockley and TH are pefectly set for a choice of the Dulwich schools, Blackheath High, Sydenham High, St. Dunstans, Colfes and even Eltham College. Better value than the cachet of a fancy post-code.

Brockley Nick said...

Nice try :)

Tamsin said...

Yes, but it is actually all true! And I didn't bother to mention Haberdashers and Crossways - State sector and far too infra dig. even if they do both have a record of getting people into Oxbridge.

Still, if he don't want us we don't want him...

Anonymous said...

I'm look at that great big hole in the ground as I type - my main complaint is that it will block my view of the Thames and City.

I have been both a City and CW worker whilst living in Brockley and both commutes are about the same in length and need for stamina. I pity my colleagues who trek in from Richmond and Kensington everyday.

But then again - maybe as I am plankton too - I don't feel the overwhelming need for a posh postcode!

Anonymous said...

@ Hugh

Not everyone who works at a bank is a 'banker'. Plenty of support staff on average wages who need a place they can afford to buy - and CW apartments can be way beyond their means.

As more people move to Brockley, more people hear about its existence.

Any development can only be good news for the area.

Anonymous said...

I don't understand what the attraction of these developments is in terms of their 'improvement' to the Brockley area. In essence you will just see a rise in house prices and lots of pretentious shops and bars opening up. If that is desirable to existing residents then why did they move to Brockley in the first place? If you can't afford to live in the alternative places you shouldn't try and change the face of other areas. Brockley is hardly the Bronx so this idea of a need for regeneration is nonsense.

Hugh said...

Am I alone in finding it hard to believe Brockley remains unknown? This may not be the explanation of relatively low property prices in the area. Maybe it's because people prefer to live elsewhere.

M said...

"If you can't afford to live in the alternative places you shouldn't try and change the face of other areas"

Why not?
Brockley is a lovely area but I'd like to see more shops, bars and restaurants here - they don't have to be 'pretentious' you know.

Tamsin said...

I tend to agree with Anon 10.57 about the extent of change that is desirable in any area. You get the same syndrome in villages. Incomers who move the country and then complain about animal noise and demand street-lights.

M said...

This is zone 2 London Tamsin. I don't think a couple of nice restaurants and bars is asking too much or will 'spoil' the area.

Anonymous said...

We've certainly seen (and have had our fill of) what Brockley can offer in terms of pretentious shops - how about a bit of non-pretentious?

Brockley Nick said...

I've no idea what your idea of 'pretentious' is but mine would be a shop that sold 'useless' things at very high prices and placed all their emphasis on presentation, stocking very few things and featuring staff who look down their noses at their customers. What we have is food shops, selling yummy things, run by people with a passion for their work, who are keen to share their passion with their customers. They're also heavily involved with their local community, contributing to xmas markets, flower planting projects, charity efforts, etc. Nowt pretentious about any of that.

We still don't yet have a single big restaurant in Brockley Cross or an alternative drinking establishment to the barge. We don't have a butcher, a garden centre, a clothes shop or any number of other businesses.
I don't know what an unpretentious shop is, but I'd have thought Costcutter or Sids or Sounds Around or any number of local newsagents counts.

It's a pretty peurile approach to try and divide the world in to "pretentious" and "unpretentious". I doubt many people would look at brockley cross and say it was bourgeois!

Tamsin said...

I just think it would be a pity to turn into Blackheath Village, Greenwich or Dulwich - with the prices and snobbery to match. If we fancy a posh evening meal or wildly extravagant shopping trip these places are in easy reach. Let's keep our own doorstep unpretentious with the decent ironmonger (now replaced in Greenwich by yet another fancy restaurant - or is it a hairdresser?) and if possible an ordinary butchers (although there is Mr Wellbeloved and the one in Nunhead not too far away) etc.

Hugh said...

It would also be completely Alice in Wonderland so I wouldn't worry about it.

tyrwhitt ali said...

I think I'm evidence that it happens. I've always been based in the Wharf and used to live in Limehouse for years. When it came to buying my own place, I came to Brockley for some character and some outside space.

Headhunter said...

Plenty of City and Wharf workers live in Brockley, admittedly not the "big swinging dick", multi million Pound front office, market movers, but plenty of people lower down the ladder, including someone like me who works in an associated industry.

Pete said...

Given the number of empty shops in Ladywell I don't think we're in too much danger of losing all of the un-pretentious shops from the area.

I'm with Nick on this; people really don't need to be so chippy.

Brockley Nick said...

Exactly, Pete. Not one of the new breed of shops has been opened at the expense of an "unpretentious" shop. Brockley and Ladywell are still blighted by empty or closed shops. We need more businesses - to say that Brockley has had its fill of shops is laughable.

In most parts of the country, where high streets are dying due to the impact of recession, the internet, supermarkets and out of town shopping centres new shops (other than pawnbrokers and bookies)opening in the local community would be a cause for celebration.

Hugh said...

HH, are things ticking up in legal recruitment? Not looking to move but interested in what the leading indicators are saying.

Tamsin said...

@Hugh - I dunno, it happened to Greenwich and Blackheath in the space of about a dozen years. Admittedly they started from a "higher" if that is the correct term base level but the transition to the pattern of restaurant/coffee shop/tourist trap/service, e.g. hairdresser in the case of the former and restaurant/coffee shop/fancy food shop/expensive specialist shop in the case of the latter is very well advanced.

Brockley Nick said...

The shops in Blackheath haven't really changed, in my view. What has changed is the nightlife. When I was growing up, it had a few, slightly grubby pubs and not much else. Now, it has quite a few bars of varying quality - but that seems to be largely driven by people from Kent coming in on the train for a night in London and alighting in Blackheath.

Anonymous said...

Allow me to clarify on my use of 'pretentious'. Two examples would be the Deptford Project and the Royal Albert in Deptford. The food is average (or in the case of the Royal Albert, just bad) and overpriced. These places act as enclaves for newcomers to the area because they are the 'places to be seen' by 'those in the know'. Do I want nice restaurants, bars and fishmongers that sell line-caught sea bass by Dave from Bognor Regis? I'm sure it would be great but then the area would just be swamped with people who can afford to pay more for property and, ultimately, poorer people end up selling because the offer is often too hard to refuse. I'd love to see some regeneration but name me a place in London that has undergone regeneration without it turning into gentrification. Often in these situations the people that move in were raised in nicer areas but can't afford to stay in those type of areas and want to turn their new found areas into more desirable places. I'd like an area with a mixture of people from different backgrounds but this idea of sustainable communities is, quite frankly, a myth.

Brockley Nick said...

Most areas of London combine rich and poor, pub and wine bar, gallery and betting shop, restaurant and kebab shop,

Notting Hill, Borough, Bloomsbury, Stoke Newington, Islington - they all feature highly mixed, sustainable communities of the sort you say doesn't exist.

Yes, some people may move on - London is a constantly shifting map. But ff poorer people choose to sell up because their house price has rocketed, how have they lost out? I agree that the area would lose out if people from only one socio-economic bracket lived here, but that will never happen, not least because of the proportion of social housing in the area.

Brockley has always featured a diverse mix of people and it always will. Except maybe now, we'll have a few more options and fewer boarded-up shops.

As for the Royal Albert being pretentious... if bad / overpriced food is pretentious then 90% of the pubs in the UK are pretentious.

Brockley Nick said...

Most areas of London combine rich and poor, pub and wine bar, gallery and betting shop, restaurant and kebab shop,

Notting Hill, Borough, Bloomsbury, Stoke Newington, Islington - they all feature highly mixed, sustainable communities of the sort you say doesn't exist.

Yes, some people may move on - London is a constantly shifting map. But ff poorer people choose to sell up because their house price has rocketed, how have they lost out? I agree that the area would lose out if people from only one socio-economic bracket lived here, but that will never happen, not least because of the proportion of social housing in the area.

Brockley has always featured a diverse mix of people and it always will. Except maybe now, we'll have a few more options and fewer boarded-up shops.

As for the Royal Albert being pretentious... if bad / overpriced food is pretentious then 90% of the pubs in the UK are pretentious.

Tamsin said...

They lose out - as they do in pretty rural places - because their children can't afford to live nearby. Communities and family ties are split or have to uproot themselves.

I don't want to get all rose-tinted-spectacles about the past but gentrification, the grand council-house sell off that benefitted a few to the detriment of many, and the uber-house price inflation fuelled by greedy and crass mortgage lending have none of them been particularly beneficial to real community cohesion. Hence it now being the current in-phrase when it comes to local authority funding.

Hugh said...

This is better than the Guardian, although they get paid for flavouring the air.

Brockley Nick said...

"They lose out - as they do in pretty rural places - because their children can't afford to live nearby. Communities and family ties are split or have to uproot themselves."

Sorry Tamsin, the situation in London isn't comparable to a remote rural community. Firstly, no-one has a right to remain in an area generation after generation. I can't afford to buy a house in the area of London in which I grew up - have I "lost out"?

No, I've discovered somewhere else and made a home here. Now, in my new home, I hope for a decent pub to drink in and somewhere to take my friends to eat on a Saturday night. Does any of this displace poorer people? No.

Have I been uprooted from my community? No, I've found a new one. And nearly everyone I grew up with has ended up in places like Brockley, for the same reasons I have. And I'm still within easy reach of friends, family and past haunts.

If you're in social housing, the property market is an irrelevance. What matters is Council provision of places - and having a few more Council Tax payers in the area helps to support better social services.

welcome to 2009 said...

Brockley's gentrification has been going on for roughly five years now.

Please could one of the inverted-snobs worrying about a middle class invasion driving the noble poor from Brockley give one tangible example of how this process has disadvantaged a single person?

All I can see is a few extra places to buy some food, a rescued pub and some new flower beds planted by those dreadful middle class people you affect to despise, despite being middle class yourself.

Tamsin said...

@Hugh. It's fun isn't it? Although my anger at the mortgage lending policies is genuine. It caused real suffering. I had conveyancing clients who I knew were over-extending themselves and heading for disaster and there was nothing one could do but point out the risks. And house price inflation was so rampant that they could not/would not take my advice.

As I see it Brockley is still going through the positive stage of gentrification, re-furbishment and a wider variety of shops opening with nothing being lost. My concerns are if it goes too much further - towards the situation of Greenwich and Blackheath - where you have lost useful shops (ironmongers and in Blackheath a reasonable baker, the tiny shop selling directly sourced African goods and, a while back now, the extraordinary taxidermists) for cloned resturants / delis or coffee bars which, at their silly prices, can presumably afford the sillier rents.

Welcome to 2009 said...

Useful shops like a taxidermists and a place that sold african trinkets? hoho.

I remember that African shop. It sold tosh to posh mugs. Its demise was hardly a sign of "gentrification."

How do you know the ironmongers wouldn't have closed without a few more bankers moving in to the area? I wonder how many ironmongers have closed in Teeside over the last 20 years.

Blackheath and Greenwich centre have ALWAYS been posh and Greenwich town centre has ALWAYS catered primarily for the tourist market, because it caters for millions of tourists. Nothing to do with "gentrification".

You'll have to do better than that!

Tamsin said...

Yes, the "useful" should have stopped short at the hardware shop (sorry, brain not working properly - ironmongers was the wrong term) and bakers. But the African shop had stuff that was cheap and either beautiful or quirky or both. Very sorry to see it go. I was also intrigued by the sign in the taxidermists to the effect that no animals were deliberately harmed in the process - they must have been very good at repairing road-kill or had contacts with numerous zoos and aviaries, but I never got to go in there to enquire before it disappeared.

The problem is not so much gentrification as such but excessive property value inflation. Time and again small independent shop-keepers I have spoken to quote hikes in rent as the reason for closing. To keep up with these you need the combination of high turnover AND high mark-up which many cannot achieve. The specialist antique shops in Greenwhich have gone and I am surprised that Pickwick Papers is still hanging on in there.

Monkeyboy said...

The Royal Albert and an old railway carriage "...act as enclaves for newcomers to the area because they are the 'places to be seen' by 'those in the know'..." that is, I'm afraid, cobblers.

Although I must admit I find it hard to elbow my way past the paparazzi when buying a pint.

Richard Elliot said...

Coming in late on the debate and I can't honestly say I have read all the comments in full, but that won't stop my two pennies worth!

@Hugh - I am (was) a young professional working in the Wharf and living in Brockley it is a perfect commute. By bike or DLR from the eastern side of Brockers.

It seems fashionable to tie large developments into making donations for completely unrelated projects in the same area. Any chance JPMorgan could build us the pedestrian / cycle bridge across the Thames that was being discussed six months ago?

Anonymous said...

Nick, I don't think my point about the Royal Albert was related to overpriced food, it was that people eat/drink in there because that's where they believe they should be. You could feed them slop and they would think it was great. This problem is widespread in modern pubs and gastropubs in London. I'm waiting for The Talbot to settle before visiting and hopefully I won't be disappointed but if it's like their other pub, I will be disappointed. However, I don't begrudge them their opportunity and it's better than it remaining vacant.

My point was more to do with the whole 'Emperor's new clothes' problem that these sheep seem to bring with them which is foolhardy not to recognise.

Welcome to 2009, my issue isn't to do with class. All my life I have mixed with members of different classes (except the Aristocracy; never met a member) and never had any problems. This is why I would like to see a mixed socio-economic area.

Why does Brockley need to change? It seems ok to me. There's plenty of other places that people could choose to live if they want specialist shops, where I hear the housing is cheap, such as Notting Hill, Borough, Stoke Newington and Islington ...aren't there, Nick?

Brockley Nick said...

Brockley's more than OK - it's great. But it could be better - with a few simple changes.

I'm sure if I lived in Notting Hill I'd feel the same.

Why do you want to make do with boarded up shops?

SC said...

I actually think the food in the Royal Albert is great. The skin-on chips are sublime! Plus it's actually a really friendly and welcoming place - a far-cry from the real pretension that lies up the road in the Amersham Arms.

Richard said...

Anon, a quick word in favour of Royal Albert. Pretentious I can understand, a matter of opinion, but I can understand. I have to disagree with bad/overpriced food, though. I covered a shift recently and tried the lamb shank and risotto, both fantastic. To be able to get a lamb shank dinner for £8 (not microwave in bag lamb shank, but top quality lamb cooked slowly on the premises) is amazing - at normal (pretentious?) mark ups it would be more like £12. I've actually advised the chef in RA to put his prices up several times, considering the cost of his dishes & labour involved, but he insists the people of Deptford won't pay it.

As for customers going there because they think they should do, I see your point and I think it's the case with lots of modern pubs, but I'm not sure you can blame the RA. It's a genuinely very good pub, keeps ales very well, has plenty of regular locals who the staff know well, etc. I think the Amersham Arms was always destined to be the place to be post-refurb, but it hasn't happened for them.

Another quick note on over-pricing - Antic have always been keen to keep prices sensible and stress to managers not to put prices up for the sake of it. At the request of the owner, RA, JC and most of the others will soon be doing a £2.50 ale (Brakspear's Bitter). The owner genuinely wants customers who have handed over good money in his pub to have something available at a really good price. Managers who opposed the pricing were quickly shot down as the owner insisted this was something important to him.

Sorry, I've gone way off topic. I'd say the plus-side of Brockley and Ladywell lacking shops, bars, etc is that there is a pleasingly high concentration of independent or small traders with real passion for what they do (Shop on the Hill, Browns, Degusation, Brockley Cycles, Toads Mouth, Brockley Mess/Moonbows, The Talbot, Mr Lawrences etc etc). Certainly not pretentious (well, not all the time). Brockley and Ladywell have changed (frustatingly) slowly, but are probably all the better for it, as a community seems to have built around the changes. Compared to your Balhams and Claphams, Brockley hasn't had a wholesale change of its local population (my family have lived in the area for 80+ years and I have plenty of customers who have been around SE4 for decades rather than years!)

M said...

Anonymous - your argument doesn't seem to amount to much more than "I don't like incomers and anyway I have better taste than they do".
Bit pretentious if you ask me...

greggs said...

"The pavements were cracked when you moved here, why do you want to fix them?"

greggs said...

"The crime level was the same when you moved here, now you want to form a neighbourhood watch scheme? How pretentious."

greggs said...

"The schools were like this when you moved here, now you're hoping that the new headteacher's going to improve things?! You shouldn't hope for better."

greggs said...

I could go on...

Anonymous said...

Richard, I have to disagree with you about looking after the ale but if you like it, fair enough. Landlord is attrociously kept and at over £3/pint. Last time I went in there I was served three times with a Gin & Tonic that was actually Gin & Soda because the pump wasn't working properly which they actually knew about. I pointed this out after my second time of being given the drink and they said, "oh yes, there's a problem with the tonic." Oh, really? Why serve it then? The third attempt was as bad as the first and I was finally offered a refund.

M, I haven't said that I don't like newcomers. I'm a relative newcomer myself but I moved here because of its 'normality' not because it's relatively cheap. I just don't like the people who are accustomed to a certain standard of living from their youth who haven't been financially successful enough to be able to live in those similar desirable areas and feel the need to convert Brockley into something more desirable for their own brand of people; a brand which covers all classes. Yes, I do consider myself to have better taste than the people who eat in the Royal Albert; that's not pretentious, it's patronising but honest.

Greggs, interesting points you make and please do feel free to continue but perhaps try suggesting something that doesn't benefit the whole community. I don't envisage politicians pushing for an increase in gastropubs and retro clothes shops in the near future.

Brockley Nick said...

Actually, anon, there's an All Party Parliamentary Group for Small Shops devoted to the question of how to save the nation's high streets from decline. Something like a retro clothes shop (Brockley actually has a few of those - shops that have been here for years) is important because it helps to sustain local life and empty shops encourage crime.

Meanwhile, the Department for Communities announced earlier this year that community galleries, craft exhibitions and similar businesses should be encouraged to replace empty shops in struggling communities up and down the country. Richard Tyler, The Telegraph's enterprise correspondent reported earlier this year that:

"As James Lowman from the Association of Convenience Stores, puts it: “We welcome creative ideas to sustain vibrant centres, but using empty shops for community projects is a last resort and is no substitute for supporting viable sustainable businesses. Thriving local shops play a vital social role and helping them to flourish is one of the best things the Government could do for communities.”"

As for "gastro pubs", well it's a very unspecific term (most people probably wouldn't use it to describe somewhere like the Royal Albert) but they are undoubtedly one of the most important models for sustaining traditional British pubs and if you type "save our pubs MP" in to Google, you'll see just how many MPs are campaigning to help pubs survive, because they recognise how important pubs are to their local communities.

Welcome to 2009 said...

So anonymous wants to live somewhere that has no decent shops or pubs and has no prospect of ever getting either. I'm sure Fred Vest will put him up in Catford.

My guess is Anonymous only needs a single bed in a windowless basement bedroom anyway.

Anonymous said...

Nick, I don't undertsand what exactly your point is in relation to my comments. I'm all for local businesses. I think you've missed the scope of my concerns. Anyway, I've said enough.

Brockley Nick said...

You said:

"try suggesting something that doesn't benefit the whole community. I don't envisage politicians pushing for an increase in gastropubs and retro clothes shops in the near future."

I was pointing out that in complete contrast to what you said, new shops and pubs do benefit the whole community and that politicians do push for an increase in these things. So yes, perhaps you have said enough.

Headhunter said...

Anon - Are you Fred Vest/Ross/Love Detective now posting as anon?

I agree with Nick. I was "displaced" from Islington, where I lived previously. Couldn't afford anything decent up there so I've moved down here where I now hope for "improvement", regeneration and/or gentrification. Does that make me a bad person?

People are constantly shifting around London and London has far more mixed populations than other cities like Paris, where poor (mostly black) inhabitants live in big clusters out on the edge.

Hugh - Sorry. Missed your question from a coule of days ago. Yes banking and legal recruitment is definitely on the rise again. We're pretty busy.

Richard said...

Anon, I can't comment on their service (what happened to you sounds poor), but I'll continue to disagree with overpriced. Landlord is expensive - at £3.10 they will be making less profit than anything they have on draught, any wines, any spirits and almost every bottle in the fridge. I haven't ever had a bad pint there, but as you say, we disagree, fair enough.

Patronising, yes. You might have better taste and elsewhere spend more on something better. But you would do well to get food of RA standard for RA prices anywhere. The pub, its products and its prices suits the area and its customers; it's very busy as a result. It doesn't suit you, you believe you can get better elsewhere, but you'll surely pay for it.

Anonymous said...

NICK - you may want to report this.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/dec/20/jp-morgan-lehman-brothers-canary-wharf

D

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