The Dead Shall Inherit the Earth


A campaign has been launched to save Honor Oak recreation ground from a fate worse than death.

Southwark Council wants to turn it in to the land of the dead, taking the place over for some lucky stiffs, since they're running out of burial locations.

If you think the dead have had their fun and they need to make way for the living, please sign the petition here.

31 comments:

Danja said...

It's much better to heat a swimming pool.

Brockley Jon said...

What's that other massive development going on next to Honor Oak Station? I took a photo the other day, will post it up when I get a chance.

Brockley Dogging Society said...

Hmmm.... interesting. I know some of our members have a view on this, just because you're dead doesn't mean you can't join in.

I shall canvas opinion and get back to you.

mb said...

new pubs all over...

http://transpont.blogspot.com/2011/02/new-south-london-pubs.html

mb said...

Srry, wrong thread....but whateva...

Brockley Jon said...

Ah yes, here it is - what's this then? (assuming it's not also been earmarked for deceased locals?

Tressilliana said...

http://www.se23.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=3341

Are they talking about the same space?

Ed said...

How is it still even legal to bury bodies? We need the land. You can take your superstitions elsewhere frankly. Beggars belief!

SE23.com also have a thread.

Tressilliana said...

What's it got to do with superstition, Ed? Cremation is far from an environmentally friendly option. Perhaps we could pile up the dead on landfill sites, or send them off on the bin lorry to SELCHP.

Anonymous said...

There was a piece on the television about the cost of burial plots and how much Councils are increasing these to- £600 + fee for allowing a memorial of £200 was cited- obviously lot more lucrative use of the land!

Ed said...

Burying the dead for later revival is one of the oldest superstitions there is and the followers of each religion will tell you of a different ritual that must be followed.

Anything other than a logical approach to disposing of unwanted and potentially hazardous organic waste is down to superstition. I know this will not be popular.

I suggest the net benefit of burning those stinky bodies outweighs those of burying them; after all if you take the burial approach to its natural conclusion we will eventually run out of land.

I'm wondering if a human compost might work...

drakefell debaser said...

I'm wondering if a human compost might work...

It would be a bit much mulching the roses with your Grandad, don't you think?

Ed said...

Good use of the Nitrogen...

Ladywell Cemetary Dogging Society said...

We would be interested in combining this new need with our passion for the love that dare not (and for 50% of its practitioners, can not) speak its name.

Ladywell Spelling Society said...

It's clear that doggers have been spending too much time dogging and not enough studying!

Ladywell Cemetary Dogging Society said...

What part of our post was wrong? Feel free to punish us for our mistakes...

Tressilliana said...

I'm hoping to be buried (not for some time yet, though) and it's not because I expect to be resurrected - quite the contrary! It's because I expect to decompose and return to the earth. Green burials are the way to go here. Look at how lovely it is walking through Brockley Cemetery now as it slowly returns to nature. We're not that desperate for land that we have to fill the air with even more emissions from the crem.

Reg said...

Why does anyone bother entering into discussion with that annoying child?

Danja said...

We're not that desperate for land that we have to fill the air with even more emissions from the crem.

Oh OK, you've convinced me - have the rec then, we can probably have it back when you are done with it in a few hundred years or more.

Anonymous said...

I propose to have Tresilliana stuffed with lentils and placed at the entrance to Brockley as an organic version of the Catford Cat. The innards could be scooped out and sold as fairtrade pate in Degustation.

Ed said...

If we are going down green street then maximum density vertical burials with biodegradable coffins are the way forward. Most civilisations have been obsessed with what we do with the lump of minerals we leave behind and given them far to much reverence (and space)...

Tressilliana said...

Oi! I've just eaten. Still, what an honour!

Ed, vertical would be fine by me. I think I'm right in saying that in Venice you only get your burial plot on Murano or whichever island it is for a few years - then your remains get turfed out to make room for someone else's. Equally fine.

Anonymous said...

How about we flytip people down the mews?

drakefell debaser said...

Anyone watch Human Planet last week with the Nepalese sky burial?

Hilly Fields, that falconer chap from the summer fayre. Sorted.

Monkeyboy said...

What about a mews fox burial?

drakefell debaser said...

I doubt foxes would be able to polish off a human like a couple of vultures. The daily mail will probably disagree though.

max said...

Tressiliana, as far as I know even in the rest of Italy you don't get buried in earth anymore, and it's been like that for quite some time.
The coffins are lowered in what I can only describe as underground shelving units where they stay for 10 years, at that point coffins are opened and the bones given a wash and put them in a smaller box and up on another shelf in bigger (overground) shelving units.
I always found this process rather awful, my preference would be for burial without a coffin so you can compost quickly instead of rotting in there.

Tamsin said...

The Small Gods Cemetery in Ankh-Morpork where you stay buried until Leggy First's "little wriggly helpers" have done their job and then get moved into the ossory where the remaining bits are sorted by type - skulls, leg-bones etc.

I've a friend who wants a cardboard coffin - which seems a good compromise - and those attending her funeral are to write farwell messages on it like an old fashioned plaster-cast.

Monkeyboy said...

I'm seriously thinking of donating my body to some research group. A bit grisly but having seen how much private cemeteries charge to be planted (my parent would choose one of THE MOST expensive ones in London) I'm loath to line someone’s pockets for the privilege. Mind you, there is the chance that some pissed medical student will steal one of my fingers and place it in a bap in an “hilarious” canteen gag.

Anonymous said...

so with all the cuts going on, our priority is to spend money on corpses? what's that about?

Monkeyboy said...

It's Keynesian economics, pay people to dig holes.

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