Park at my House

BC stalwart JPM has sent us this link to a website called Parkatmyhouse.com which allows people to hire out their own parking bays to people looking for parking space. Sites like these are an efficient way of allocating resources, but only work in areas with resident parking.


There are spaces on the market in Brockley, Ladywell, Honor Oak, New Cross and Deptford.

66 comments:

Anonymous said...

The one in Foxwell st £50 a week,4 car spaces £200 a week,nice little earner.

max said...

Wealth creation.

Danja said...

Almost as good as a money tree.

Anonymous said...

Or a mung-y tree

Mugs game said...

As Brockley doesn't have controlled parking it's hard to see who would pay.

Headhunter said...

I was thinking that. The reason commuters come to Brockley to dump their cars is because it's completely free and uncontrolled

Anonymous said...

Because it gets them a guaranteed space, you cretins.

Tamsin said...

What a perfectly horrible way of encouraging the conversion of more front gardens into unsightly and eco-unfriendly hard-standing. Which, in the process, loses one, if not two, on-street spaces open to all and for free on a relaxed as-and-when basis.

Hope the planning authorities and the much-maligned Brock Soc. are alert to this possibility.

Headhunter said...

Converting front gardens into parking in T Hill and Brockley cons areas is not allowed is it? You're also supposed to get planing permission to do it elsewhere because there is an increasing problem with run off water from people paved front gardens overwhelming the drainage system, whereas previously it would soak into the exposed earth.

Anonymous said...

Hear Hear HH.

Charlie said...

This is fabulous news!!!

Ed said...

HH, try telling that to those bog-brained morons.

Do I detect yet more support for CPZ? Time for a new poll?

Anonymous said...

No you do NOT detect more support for a CPZ.

Let's keep roads for road users - and that includes drivers. To be able to drive to and park anywhere.

Brockley Nick said...

Yes, let's let people park wherever they like, whether or not it obstructs business, endangers schoolkids or prevents people who actually live there park outside their own home.

Moira said...

Since the CPZ was introduced in Ladywell, the commuter cars have moved to surrounding roads. I spoke to one resident of Embleton Road who said it's impossible for residents to park there now. Cars are also parking on the area of the junction of Fossil Road and Ellerdale Road where it used to be empty during the day.

Headhunter said...

Car parking is like drug dealing in that sense. You address it in 1 spot and it just moves on and makes a pain in the *rse of itself somewhere else...

Anonymous said...

That's why it's perfectly reasonable for residents who already have driveways (lucky they), to lease parts of their lawfully owned driveways to others.
How Tamsin can be at odds with something that alleviates on street parking is beyond me.
Imagine seeing empty driveways all over Brockley but with every 'on street' parking space occupied?

Brockley Nick said...

There are a number of reasons why further creation of driveways should be opposed:

1. They make it harder for rain water to drain away, causing more flash flooding, which already occurs across London and many other parts of the country, since we have Victorian drainage systems which weren't built with modern cities and heavier rainfalls in mind.

2. They damage the character of the area - basically, most driveways look bloody horrible and have a negative visual impact on those who live next door and across the street.

3. They reduce the amount of green space in our cities, reducing biodiversity and worsening air pollution.

I can't remember which road it is in the conservation area, but one of the local nurseries perennially has huge four wheel drive vehicles parked on a driveway blocking its own front windows.

Why anyone would want to look out of their front window and look out on to the boot of their car is beyond me, personally. But then, I don't know why some people buy driving gloves and beaded seat covers either.

Brockley Nick said...

Having said all that, I quite agree that those people who have legal driveways or parking bays should be free to do this. As I said in the article, I think it's a great idea and a good way for the market to reallocate space.

Anonymous said...

am wonder if sum bodie dere who myte add vice give for the free, of which we pay may be late r. culd be dun cash . you no wot meen. if we own garij on es tate an we ony pais small rent to couns 30 pee by munth this due to havin writ to the counsel of leek wot need fix but no fix cose is no leek reely in garij. We ony sai for cheepr rent.. now lyke charge for the rent for office rich person drive the carr. if we mayt please culd user rent for diposit on granny her flat cos shes bin offer it cheep for live long there by council lewisham. add vice now pleasz…

Reg said...

My 'advise' is that you give the council a ring - and let them know of your plans.

Nux said...

Are you allowed to rent out spaces if you are a lolcat?

Tamsin said...

Yes, so be nice and friendly - if you have a drive space and no car, tell your neighbour they're welcome to use it in return for occasional baby-sitting or a case of wine at Christmas. In the flats next door the guy on the lower ground floor with the parking doesn't have a car so it is used by the lady upstairs.

What I dislike is the ruthlessly commercial cashing in, the website taking a commission (presumably - as I saw no advertising on it whereby it could otherwise be remunerated) and the temptation it presents to those who might convert first and seek planning permission afterwards, if at all.

Of course I am not adovcating a free-for-all and dangerous parking practices. However, front drives being converted hard-standing does not alleviate the pressure on street parking - makes it worse, in fact, because it permanently takes out of commission the space in front of it.

Still hoping for a CPZ said...

I have a feeling the CPZ issue will not go away, even since your own poll a few weeks ago was inconclusive. Yesterday morning when it was bucketing down with rain, the roads around the station were (inevitably) even more rammed than usual and I had to park even further from my house than I normally do after dropping the kids at school (don't normally use the car for this anyway).

As autumn / winter sets in I think we'll see more and more people driving to the station who have been walking there over the summer. Do people generally agree that there are more people using the station since the ELL? If so, that's potentially more cars around here too on cold / wet days.

I appreciate that it's complicated since you can't just shift the problem from Foxberry Road to Howson for instance, but it is becoming increasingly obvious that there's a problem. And I don't even use my car very much.

Brockley Nick said...

@Tamsin

"What I dislike is the ruthlessly commercial cashing in, the website taking a commission"

Oh dear Tamsin, you do sound like a reactionary old luddite.

Someone has created a socially useful business, which allows individuals to generate personal income from a resource which would otherwise be wasted. And yes, they make some money from it. Perhaps they even turn a profit. Nothing wrong with that. Quite the contrary.

Is there any evidence that anyone has ever dug up their front garden as a result? I bet there isn't.

Anonymous said...

Tamsin p-l-e-a-s-e take off those rose-tinted-green-specs.

No one is allowed to convert a front garden into a driveway - especially in the conservation area.

If anyone is foolish enough to, then I'm sure there is someone like you to point out the error of their ways.

In fact, there are many people who have garages that are unused, and driveways that are no doubt older than your old shoulders, so no matter what you think these people may choose to make money out of their property in ways that you clearly cannot.

Remember, no one is calling for gardens to be made into driveways, only for existing - unused by the day (because their owners have taken their cars to work?) - garages and driveways to be made commercially available.

By the way, that could be a right of way space to someone else's property that preceeds the establishment of the precious conservation area itself in many cases. So get over it.

Charlie said...

Have to agree, this is valuable income stream and I for one won't be letting it go to waste.

Danja said...

Oh dear Tamsin, you do sound like a reactionary old luddite.

Such is the power of coincidence.

Tamsin said...

You're right - no-one would convert without Council permission because a part of the process has to be dropping the kerb or else there would have to be considerable discount for damaged tyres.

And - water run-off etc. - it is probably the case that conservation area or not permission for further conversions would be refused. It is just that there have been so many in the less enlightened past.

I knew that hankering after a bit of friendly neighbourliness was rather rose-tinted of me - but where does the green come in?

Headhunter said...

Tamsin? Green? Nah - this is the woman who drives everywhere by her own admission!

Anonymous said...

@Nux no but you can haz cheeseburger

Brockley Nick said...

It could also be argued that this is a green solution - efficient management of resources reducing the need to create more parking spaces.

On the one hand, it might encourage more driving, on the other hand, it might encourage people to park and ride as an alternative to driving all the way in. It might also stop people driving around and around looking for a free spot. Hard to know.

But "green" politics as opposed to Green politics is about resource efficiency. This is efficient.

Tamsin said...

But at least I feel guilty about driving.

And once it stops raining and my time frees up so that I can spend an hour and a half a day on pure pleasure I will start walking over Hilly Fields again - promise...

get under your umbarella ella ella said...

And once it stops raining and my time frees up .....

This is England Tamsin, it will never stop raining.

Headhunter said...

Tut, tut, Tamsin! Guilt doesn't prevent climate change you know!

hilly dogger said...

we're here for you Tamsin

Headhunter said...

Dogging's not good for the environment either. It damages the natural habitat of insects and small mammals... Shame on you.

Ed said...

CPZ CPZ CPZ!

The other night I came home late to see five large white vans in Coulgate Street and whilst there were other spaces available it looked like an industrial car pak not the lovely village centre many of us want. I have nothing against idustrial car parks but I don't want one at the heart of my community; selfish aren't I?

Deptford Pudding said...

In the CA you apply for planning permission, the requirement is (or was) that you had at 3 metres of car-wide space in your garden, and that it was perpendicular to the kerb, no parking sideways across the front of your house. You had to sort out the space in your front garden first before they'd give you permission, prepare it in other words. Then they give you permisssion, it is or was council policy to get as many cars off the road as possible. Then they charged around £500 to drop the kerb. A dropped kerb should only be 1 normal car length wide, it doesn't take up space that could be used by 2 or 3 others if it wasn't there, cars don't park with bumpers touching. Making your own parking space and just driving up the kerb is an offence. Many of the houses, the bigger hoses, had drives from years ago. There are several that have very narrow drives and old garages tiny by todays standards. Only about 4 or 5 years ago a house in Tyrwhitt applied for and got permission to build a new brick garage.

Anonymous said...

Tamsin, the kerb isn't dropped to save the tyres, just to ensure that the driveway slopes gently and that the work is doen properly.

Water run-off can also be designed into a driveway.

But by your standards we should be taking up every public footpath for the rain to run freely, somewhat like the Amazon. (Love to see the subsidence bill on that little scheme.) That's why driveways are designed to 'run off' gently.

Whilst we're at it, Tamsin, why don't wwe just knock all the houses down in order that the rain can get to the roots.

The green come in as in rather green behind the ears.

drakefell debaser said...

Hang on; it is my understanding that concreting over a place reduces the amount of water that can soak down thus reducing the level of the water table. In London where much of the subsoil is clay, this leads to subsidence because the clay dries up and shrinks. Not the other way around.

Headhunter said...

Absolutely. Anon appears to be spouting cr@p. You concrete a front garden and the water runs off onto the road and into street gulleys which already take run off from the road itself and pavements. It may be possible to build in some kind of penetrable membrane (at cost) to allow some of the run off to penetrate the drive somehow, but I doubt it would allow for as much trainwater to be absorbed as a simple, straightforward garden.

The council's policy in the past may have been to encourage people to build driveways for their cars but I'm less sure these days, councils up and down the country are realising that driveways flood and damage public drainage systems which costs councils and taxpayers money to repair...

Anonymous said...

Absolute rubbish, Headhunter, live in a flat without drive do you? The modern driveway can be designed to drain rainwater into the ground in order that it doesn't overwhelm the trees and forna, or the fabric of the building. That's why modern buildings are designed to push rainwater back, or collect some of it for use later. So the toilet paper's over to you! Concreted over every garden and lets get the cars off the streets I say!

Anonymous said...

Heasdhunter, I forgot to add... we should dig up the cycle tracks around brockley and seed them, Failing that, we should never have allowed brockley to be built on in the first place!

Headhunter said...

I did say that it was probably possible to build some kind of penetrable membrane to allow water to filter through (at high cost) but I find it hard to believe that even that would allow as much water to filter into the earth than just.... bare earth/garden!

What cycle tracks around Brockley? Cycle tracks in Brockley and around London and the UK tend to be a strip of green (or now blue) paint on the road which goes for 100 metres before ending, which cars generally park in! You're welcome to dig them up, biggest waste of money ever in my view.

Deptford Pudding said...

I wonder if they had these daft discussions, but about horses and the size of your neighbours' carriages, when the houses were being built back in the 1880s. "Better not cobble the mews young fella. It'll stop the horse pee soakin' inta t'foundations of yon grand house."

drakefell debaser said...

Er no, they didn't. Cobbles drain quite well.

Brockley Dogging Society said...

Doggers are now protected!

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/3170364/Its-a-fair-copse-as-police-protect-doggers.html

Deptford Pudding said...

Not sure how you measure and compare the draining performance of cobbles and other surfacing materials. The large rectangular granite setts you see surviving around Brockley were laid onto a bed of hard core and/or concrete. Earlier large irregular pebbles, also known as cobbles, fell out of favour because they were uncomfortable to travel over in a carriage.

Danja said...

Setts were traditionally grouted with bitumen, so I don't imagine that a combination of granite and bitumen made for a particularly permeable surface.

Headhunter said...

"Better not cobble the mews young fella. It'll stop the horse pee soakin' inta t'foundations of yon grand house"

Why did navvies building the houses in Brockley speak with strange pseudo Yorkshire accents?

There was actually a lot of debate about horse manure and pee and where it soaked into or sat once deposited as highlighted on another thread here. See the great horse manure crisis of 1894.

This must be the equivalent of our debates these days about exhaust emissions and parking/traffic problems...

Anonymous said...

Don't a lot of people have there drive done in block paving rather than concrete.

Headhunter said...

"I wonder if they had these daft discussions, but about horses and the size of your neighbours' carriages, when the houses were being built back in the 1880s."

Of course they bloody did! Human nature has always been to get the best of everything for yourself, hence the large houses in Brockley for the wealthy. Keeping up with the Jones's is hardly a new invention! The whole class system which thrived in Victorian England is based on having more money, a bigger carriage and a better house than someone else.

Deptford Pudding said...

ee'l blow a gask't if 'ee carries on loike thart mi dook begorra

Anonymous said...

Parking is a valuable resource.

In a crowded city with a transport system that forces an unconfortable physical intimacy on strangers simply in order to get to work, personal space is a precious thing.

That is what a car represents: your own choice of music or radio and you are well a away from someone elses poorly permused armpit and inane mutterings. It is also cheaper and more flexible in the poorly connected suburbs. Londoners suffer the most expensive transport system in the world.

Personally, I look forward to the day when one million people are not forced to travel into town each day just to keep the boss satisfied their workers are beavering away and on message.

Brockley will shortly be re-cabled with fibres besides the liberation from broadcast media, we might find video conferencing becomes cheap and easy.

Of course, you wouldn't want the boss or clients to see you anything less than at your best. So I predict a demand for small local offices. Somewhere you can rent on a casual basis with all the basics you need: video quality lighting and sound, a fast broadband link, photocopier, mailbox.

That and a decent grocery home delivery service that does not charge the earth, would reduce the demand for cars considerably. That or a convenient local place to pick up parcels and groceries.

Such things would transform this neighbourhood and many others and make the whole place more of a local community rather than a series of City commuter boltholes that yearn for off street parking because they have little or no interest in the area in which they live.

I think you can measure such progress in Brockley by the ratio of yummie mummies with bugaboos versus blokes with laptops in the local cafes.

Just as electrifcation and the rubber tyre changed the way people lived in Brockley, it did not happen overnight. From the horse manure crisis to the electric trams to the car probably took forty years. So maybe it will take the same sort of time for the Death of Commuting.

Given the propensity of the governments to constantly search for new streams of taxation. I suspect that we will find little radio chips implanted onto valuable parking spaces that talk to similar chips in your car and deduct your bank account automatically.

The more the parking regulation pervade and enforced, then the more those paved over gardens and local shop forecourts will become increasingly valuable assets and blight the area.

Brockley fate may well be lie in what happens in the more distant suburbs where many of the commuters come from. Company policy with respect to homeworking, public transport services, traffic management and parking all influence how and why people travel. They are, however, all run by different organisations in different areas with their own local priorities.

Brockely will attract a lot more parking space hungry commuters because of the new train link. The service to Shoreditch is very convenient for getting to that part of the City.

It is going to get worse.

Anonymous said...

Commuters seem to have taken the habit to park every morning in the same spot. If CPZ will change their habit a pair of punched tires may do it.

Anonymous said...

Brockley Station is not on the list

Future CPZ consultations

1. Hither Green East CPZ Extension
2. Old Road/Bankwell Road CPZ Extension
3. Lewisham CPZ Extension
4. Ladywell Area CPZ
5. Hither Green West CPZ Extension
6. David's Road CPZ Extension
7. Mountsfield Park CPZ
8. Lee Area CPZ

Anonymous said...

'a convenient local place to pick up parcels or groceries...' That'd be a post office and shops wouldn't it?

Anonymous said...

Are there any Post Offices left.

Anonymous said...

yes, a coule on Brockley Road plus the sorting office. Do you live round here?

Anonymous said...

re post office, convenient also relates to opening times. the sorting office is hardly friendly to those in full time work

Anonymous said...

but the sorting office is open on a saturday...

Brockley Nick said...

So if your delivery arrives on a Monday, you can simply pick it up on Saturday! Very convenient. Just don't order ice cream.

Tamsin said...

Or brie or chocolate in the summer.

Some small shops also do a favour to regular customers by agreeing to take in deliveries.

Anonymous said...

well yes... :P but I get everything delivered to work anyway. Mainly because a lot of places now use Home Delivery Network who are awful! (delivery between 7am and 6pm, no saturday delivery and depot is on the Old Kent Road somewhere - now that is what I call convenient!!)

DJ said...

Only open Saturday morning though. They don't want to make it too easy for you.

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